Syndicate content

Water

Thay đổi bộ mặt bến nước đô thị

Fen Wei's picture
 ELBE&FLUT / Thomas Hampel at http://www.hafencity.com
HafenCity, Hamburg.
Photo Credit: ELBE&FLUT / Thomas Hampel at http://www.hafencity.com

Bà Jane Jacobs, một chuyên gia đô thị nổi tiếng, từng nói: “Bến nước không phải là một thực thể biệt lập, luôn có sự gắn kết với mọi vật.”
 
Đây là sự gắn kết hai chiều, thể hiện mối quan hệ giữa đô thị và các bến nước trong đô thị, vốn luôn có sự thay đổi cũng như bản thân đô thị vậy.
 
Phát triển từ quan niệm cũ trong thời đại công nghiệp hóa với vai trò là những bến cảng, cầu tàu đô thị, trong mấy chục năm qua, bến nước trong đô thị đã mang những ý nghĩa mới.

Một mặt, bến nước đô thị đóng vai trò đáng kể hơn trong việc thay đổi bộ mặt của đô thị hay thậm chí tái định hình bản sắc của đô thị.
 
Mặt khác, những dự án cải tạo bến nước đô thị thành công cũng cho thấy các nguồn lực của đô thị, như quỹ đất, nguồn nước sạch, di tích lịch sử, sự hồi sinh của đô thị, có thể được khai thác, tận dụng như thế nào, cũng như làm thế nào để lồng ghép những thực thể này vào cuộc sống của đô thị và người dân.

Các dự án đầu tư đột phá giúp kinh tế Việt Nam phát triển

Kristalina Georgieva's picture

Available in english



Tháng trước tôi có dịp sang công tác tại Việt Nam. Những tiến triển mạnh mẽ tại đây so với 17 năm trước đã gây cho tôi một ấn tượng mạnh.

Năm 2000, kênh Nhiêu Lộc – Thị Nghè chảy qua khu trung tâm Thành Phố Hồ Chí Minh còn ô nhiễm và gây ảnh hưởng xấu lên sức khỏe người dân sống và làm việc trong khu vực. Nhưng hôm nay, dòng kênh đã được cải tạo với dòng nước trong và sạch, mang thêm màu xanh và sức khỏe cho 1,2 triệu người sống tại khu vực này – một khu đô thị đang phát triển nhanh chóng.

Water Access in the Philippines: Fixing the Institutions that Fix the Pipes

Aileen Castro's picture
Photo: NorthEyes Production/World Bank

As we celebrate World Water Day, I find myself thinking about my work and one central question: how do you reach 8 million Filipinos with no access to clean water? I remember growing up in Pampanga, a province north of Manila, and visiting my aunt’s house every weekend where I had to pump water from a deep well and carry buckets so we could water plants, wash clothes, and clean the backyard pig pen. Fortunately, these days there’s always water from the faucet so we don’t work as hard to do chores.

But the story isn’t the same for everyone. While our local water utility largely improved its services over the years, I can’t say the same for the rest of the country, especially in rural areas. While there are already over 4,700 water utilities in the Philippines, about half are very small and unregulated.

Papua New Guinea: Improving Water and Sanitation in the land of the unexpected

Karl Galing's picture
Coming together to improve water and sanitation: Villagers in the remote Torricelli Mountains in West Sepik, Papua New Guinea transporting water tanks to their community (Photo: Tenkile Conservation Foundation, Lumi)

I have been traveling in and out of Papua New Guinea for almost over two years to help tackle the country’s water and sanitation challenges.
 
I’m constantly surprised by the complexity and cultural diversity of this country. It’s like trying to solve a deep mystery, with a surprise always ahead of you. No wonder they call this ‘the land of the unexpected’.

Papua New Guinea missed its Millennium Development Goal target for water and sanitation. More than 60% of the country’s population (4.6 million people) have no access to safe drinking water and improved sanitation. In over two decades since 1990, the increase in access to safe drinking water has been miniscule (6%) while improved sanitation coverage even dropped by 1% in 2015. Sadly, PNG has the lowest water and sanitation access indicators among the 15 developing Pacific Island nations.

Ending a 20-year water crisis in a remote village in Solomon Islands

Evan Wasuka's picture
Surrounded by water, Nanngu’s taps have been without drinking water for the past 20 years.

With the throttle at full tilt, the boat cut through the surf, spraying salt water into the air. 
Around me, the unfolding scenery is breathtaking. White sandy beaches, turquoise blue seas, swaying coconut palms – the textbook image of paradise in the South Pacific.
 
What more could one ask for in paradise?  

Water, is what they will tell you. “They” are the people of Nanngu Village on the island of Santa Cruz in the far east of Solomon Islands. 
 
Out here, water to drink, cook food with, wash and keep clean is hard to come by.
 
The last time they had proper running water was 20 years ago. That came to an end at the hands of a Category Three cyclone, Nina, which hit the islands in 1993.
 
As I write this, we’re on our way to Nanngu to see a new World Bank-supported project bringing water to the village.

Việt Nam có thể học hỏi được gì từ Singapore về quản lý rủi ro ngập lụt

Linh X. Le's picture
 Toàn cảnh công viên Bishan-Ang Mo Kio, Singapore. Ảnh: Stefan/Flickr

Đối với người dân Việt Nam, đất nước Singapore không chỉ là một "con rồng Châu Á" mà còn rất gần gũi nhờ mối quan hệ thân mật giữa lãnh đạo nước nhà với Cựu Thủ tướng Lý Quang Diệu, người đứng đằng sau tất cả những thành công của Singapore ngày nay. Là biểu tượng của sự hiện đại và văn minh, đặc biệt với điều kiện tài nguyên thiên nhiên hạn chế, Singapore là mô hình đáng để Việt Nam học tập trên con đường phát triển theo hướng cạnh tranh, bền vững và văn minh.
 

中国城市可以从新加坡借鉴哪些经验?

Wanli Fang's picture
Also available in: English
新加坡Marina海湾的再开发项目将河道的一部分改造成水库。摄影: 10 FACE/Shutterstock

上周,我有幸参加了新加坡城市周活动。一同参加本次活动的还有世行驻华代表处的其他同事以及来自中国政府和参与世行项目的城市代表。对我们参会者而言,此行可以说是开阔眼界,使我们更清晰地了解到综合性的城市规划方法对构建可持续城市所起的重要作用,并为我们提供了诸多可推广的经验。这些经验稍加调整后即可为实现不同城市自身发展的目标提供实用的解决方案。以下几点经验供大家参考:
 
发展战略以人为本
 
要做到这一点,需要城市规划人员时刻关注市民对城市空间的日常体验,并通过公众参与请市民在决策过程发挥作用。譬如,在许多城市,公共交通被视为一种低端且不具备吸引力的出行方式,即便在交通拥堵严重情况下,公交载客量增长也停滞不前。但在新加坡,2014年公共交通在各种出行方式中的占比高达三分之二。在该市,乘坐地铁出行不仅舒适而且高效,因为各种公交工具和线路之间的换乘很方便,有明确的标识指引系统,换乘站点之间建有配备空调的连接走廊,并且为老年乘客和行动不便的乘客配置了考虑周到的空间设计和服务设施。此外,地铁站与主要零售和商业设施以及其它公共服务设施融合在一起,从而大大减少了最后一公里的连接问题。
 

What can Chinese cities learn from Singapore?

Wanli Fang's picture
Also available in: 中文
One of Singapore’s latest redevelopment projects included the construction of a freshwater reservoir. Photo: 10 FACE/Shutterstock

Last week, I had the opportunity to attend the Singapore Urban Week along with other colleagues from the World Bank Beijing office, as well as delegates from China’s national government and participating cities. For all of us, this trip to Singapore was an eye-opening experience that highlighted the essential role of integrated urban planning in building sustainable cities, and provided practical solutions that can be readily adapted to help achieve each city’s own development vision. A couple of key lessons learned:

Putting people at the center of development strategies

This is only possible when planners always keep in mind people’s daily experience of urban space and invite them as part of decision-making process through citizen engagement.

For instance, in many cities, public transit has been perceived as a low-end, unattractive option of travel, causing ridership to stagnate despite severe traffic congestion. But in Singapore, public transit accounts for 2/3 of the total travel modal share in 2014. Moving around the city by metro is comfortable and efficient because transfers between different modes and lines are easy, with clear signage of directions, air-conditioned connecting corridors, and considerate spatial designs and facilities for the elderly and physically-challenged users. In addition, metro stations are co-located with major retail and commercial activities and other urban amenities, significantly reducing last-mile connectivity issues.

Pages