Syndicate content

Philippines: Shattering the Myths: It’s Not Tough to Build Green

Maria Teresita Lacerna's picture
Solar panels on the Tiarra houses in an affordable housing community in Batagas, south of Metro Manila, are expected to contribute to 32 percent savings in energy.

Buildings now dot the skyline of Bonifacio Global City in Metro Manila, which hosts, among others, the offices of the World Bank and the International Finance Corporation.  Who would have thought that this former military camp could be transformed into a bustling economic center in less than ten years?  And, with the rise of commercial buildings and residential condominiums following the area’s fast-paced growth, we see a growing demand for electricity that causes stress on the environment and resources. 

跟踪监测城市化:大数据如何推动制定相关政策确,确保城市增长造福贫困人口

Axel van Trotsenburg's picture
Also available in: English
 Measuring a Decade of Spatial Growth

每一分钟,东亚地区都有数十人从农村迁往城市。

随着人口大规模迁移,世界上形成了一些超大城市,如东京、上海、雅加达、首尔、马尼拉等,也形成了若干中小城市。

使用清洁饮水到乘坐每天上下班高峰时段在各城市间运送数以百万计人口的高铁,这一转变对人们生活和生计的方方面面产生了影响。

人们之所以迁往城市,是为了寻找更好的工作,改善生活状况。不过,城市化也伴随着风险,这些风险有可能延长贫困期,导致机会缺乏,不能改善未来发展前景。

城市一旦建成,城市形态和土地利用模式就锁定下来,后代难以更改。现在城市化相关工作,可避免今后花几十年时间和大量资金来修正错误。

Malaysia: From Developing Nation to Development Partner

Axel van Trotsenburg's picture
World Bank Vice President for East Asia & Pacific on opening a new office in Malaysia

In 1954, the World Bank’s first mission report on Malaya – as the soon-to-be-independent country was called then – expressed concern about its development prospects. The mission was “favorably impressed with Malaya’s economic potentialities and prospects for expansion.” But it questioned  whether the “rates of economic progress and additions to employment opportunities can move ahead of or even keep up with the pace at which the population and the labor force are growing.”

Sixty years and 25 million more Malaysians later, hindsight proved such worries overdone as income per capita climbed from USD 250 at the time of the report to over USD$10,000 today.

 

With its successful economic and social development, Malaysia is now actively moving into a new role as a global development partner—supporting other countries in ending poverty and sharing lessons from its journey to become a regional economic powerhouse. This new role is a natural fit for a nation in transition toward a high-income status, and a big gain for the rest of us.

 

Tracking Urbanization: How big data can drive policies to make cities work for the poor

Axel van Trotsenburg's picture
Also available in: 中文
 Measuring a Decade of Spatial Growth

Every minute, dozens of people in East Asia move from the countryside to the city.

The massive population shift is creating some of the world’s biggest mega-cities including Tokyo, Shanghai, Jakarta, Seoul and Manila, as well as hundreds of medium and smaller urban areas.

Philippines: Traffic woes and the road ahead

louielimkin's picture
Traffic congestion results in an estimated productivity loss of around PHP2.4 billion ($54 million) a day or more than PHP800 billion ($18 billion) a year.



From my house in northern Quezon City, I drive more than two hours every day to get to the office in Bonifacio Global City, which is about three cities away where I come from, and two cities away from the capital Manila. It’s a journey that should only take around half an hour under light traffic. That is a total of four hours on the road a day, if there is no road accident or bad weather. It takes me an hour longer whenever I use the public transport system. Along with hundreds of thousands of Metro Rail Transit (MRT) commuters, I have to contend with extremely long lines, slow trains, and frequent delays due to malfunctions. This has been my experience for several years. Many of us might be wondering: why have these problems persisted?

Businesses benefit where governments are unable or unwilling to protect human rights, right? Wrong

Carolyn Blacklock's picture



When one thinks of businesses operating in countries that are still struggling to protect and provide for human rights, a narrative can easily spring to mind involving unscrupulous businesses happily taking advantage of weak labor laws, a lack of minimum wage and poor environmental controls. But, in many places, the reality is very different. Not only is the private sector itself adversely impacted by weak human rights protections but, more than this, businesses are themselves having to take up a leadership role to compensate for weaknesses that exist at a national level.

Tiga pelajaran penting dari Tsunami 2004

Abhas Jha's picture
Also available in: English



Pada dasarnya saya adalah orang yang pragmatis, mengingat awal karir saya sebagai petugas kelurahan, lanjut terus ke kecamatan, di India, ketika saya bertanggungjawab untuk banyak hal yang terjadi di lapangan, mulai dari persediaan air hingga rencana penggunaan lahan pertanian. Namun saya sangat sedih dan terpukul menyaksikan dampak dari bencana tsunami 2004. Di Indonesia saja, sekitar 220.000 orang kehilangan nyawa.

Three key lessons from the 2004 Tsunami

Abhas Jha's picture
Also available in: Bahasa Indonesia



I began my professional career as a sub-district and district level administrator in India-a position that makes one responsible for pretty much everything- from making sure the water comes out of the taps and the garbage is collected in the morning to helping pull accident victims out from horrific accidents and facing down stone-pelting mobs. This early experience of being thrown into the deep end of the pool gives me a somewhat pragmatic sense of perspective and equanimity. But I still recall the horror and overwhelming grief that I felt when the full impact of the 2004 Tsunami started becoming clear. In Indonesia alone approximately 220,000 people lost their lives.

Video Blog: World Bank Vice President for East Asia and Pacific visits Indonesia

Axel van Trotsenburg's picture
Video Blog: World Bank Vice President for East Asia and Pacific visits Indonesia


Axel van Trotsenburg, World Bank Vice President for East Asia and Pacific, travelled to Indonesia, where he visited the capital Jakarta and Makassar in South Sulawesi. He noted that Indonesia faces a large challenge in meeting infrastructure needs, in order to provide basic services and integrate a country with over 17,000 islands.
 

World Bank Vice President for East Asia Invites the Public to Discuss the Future of Vietnam

Axel van Trotsenburg's picture
World Bank Vice President for East Asia Invites the Public to Discuss the Future of Vietnam

World Bank Vice President for East Asia and Pacific Axel van Trotsenburg invites everyone to join a discussion on how Vietnam can achieve the objective of becoming a modern, industrialized nation in the next decades.

Pages