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Chile

Teach: Enfrentar a crise da aprendizagem, uma sala de aula de cada vez

Ezequiel Molina's picture
Also available in: French | English | Español | Arabic



Apesar do enorme progresso feito para que mais crianças estejam em sala de aula, estamos no meio de uma crise global de aprendizagem, onde um grande número de crianças conclui o ensino primário sem sequer possuir competencias básicas de literacia e numeraciaO que explica este fenómeno?  Para responder a esta pergunta, considere os seguintes exemplos de salas de aula onde as chances de levar os alunos ao sucesso são improváveis.

Teach: Abordando la crisis de aprendizaje, aula por aula

Ezequiel Molina's picture
Also available in: French | English | Portuguese | Arabic



A pesar del enorme progreso realizado en lograr que haya más niños en el aula, nos encontramos en medio de una crisis global de aprendizaje, donde un gran número de niños finalizan la educación primaria sin siquiera poseer las habilidades básicas de lectura, escritura y aritmética. ¿Qué explica este fenómeno?  Para responder esta pregunta, considere los siguientes ejemplos de aulas donde las posibilidades de éxito de los estudiantes son muy bajas.

Teach: Tackling the learning crisis, one classroom at a time

Ezequiel Molina's picture
Also available in: French | Español | Portuguese | Arabic
 



Despite tremendous progress in getting children into the classroom, we are experiencing a global learning crisis, where a large share of children complete primary school lacking even basic reading, writing, and arithmetic skillsWhat explains this phenomenon? To answer this question, consider the following examples of classrooms that are unlikely to put students on a path to success. 

Latin America: Is better technical and technological higher education the answer?

Diego Angel-Urdinola's picture
Also available in: Español
 
A new World Bank study finds that some Chilean technicians with a two-year degree have education returns that are only slightly lower than those of professionals. (Photo: Dominic Chavez/World Bank)



Two years ago, 23-year-old Pedro Flores became a technician specializing in renewable energy—all thanks to a degree from a technical institute in Maule, located in one of Chile’s poorest regions. After completing his degree in just two years, Flores became the only person in his family to obtain an advanced degree. Today, he lives in Santiago and works for a private solar energy multinational corporation, where he earns a competitive salary that is only slightly below the average for entry-level professionals in his field, most of whom spent over five years in university.

Economy mega shifts are here to stay – Tap your talents to thrive

Salah-Eddine Kandri's picture
Editor’s Note: This guest blog is by Salah-Eddine Kandri, the Global Sector Lead for education at the International Finance Corporation (IFC).
 
 Li Wenyong / World Bank
According to a report from McKinsey, about 60 percent of occupations have at least 30 percent of their activities automatable. This means new sets of skills need to be acquired. (Photo: Li Wenyong / World Bank)


When I visited Peru for the first time last month for a business development trip, I met with the heads of some leading private education institutions. At the end of my visit, I decided to book a cultural tour of Lima. During the tour, I asked our guide Marcos where he learned English as I found him very articulate, knowledgeable and with a good sense of humor. To my pleasant surprise and astonishment, he told me that he learned it by himself, mainly online. He then started practicing with visiting tourists until he became more comfortable leading tours himself.      

Bootcamps: Raising expectations for girls in math, science and technology

Juliana Guaqueta Ospina's picture
Also available in: Español
A Laboratoria classroom in Peru
Laboratoria, a nonprofit organization that runs six-month courses, targets girls from low-income families who face major barriers to accessing higher education. (Photo: Laboratoria)


Intensive “bootcamp” training programs that develop coding and other computer science skills and directly connect students with jobs are becoming increasingly popular. In the U.S, there are already over 90 bootcamps—and they are taking root in Latin America too, helping to close the region’s skills and gender gaps.

“Bootcamps”: aumentan las expectativas de las niñas en los campos de matemáticas, ciencia y tecnología

Juliana Guaqueta Ospina's picture
Also available in: English
A Laboratoria classroom in Peru
Laboratoria, organización sin fines de lucro que dirige cursos de seis meses para niñas de familias de bajos ingresos que enfrentan barreras para acceder a la educación superior. Foto: Laboratoria

Six ways to turn education spending into investments with high returns

Harry A. Patrinos's picture
Education is an investment: every year of schooling raises earnings by ten percent. Photo: Maxim Zolotukhin / World Bank

Last month, I joined a group of former education ministers and experts for a consultation on the key challenges facing ministries of education and how to formulate an appropriate curriculum.

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