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Quality education for all: measuring progress in Francophone Africa

Raja Bentaouet Kattan's picture
Also available in: Français
 
Despite notable gains in expanding access, countries in West Africa still face a great challenge in providing a quality education for all. Photo: Ami Vitale / The World Bank


Quality education is one of the most powerful instruments for reducing poverty and inequality; yet it remains elusive in many parts of the world. The Programme for the Analysis of Education Systems (PASEC), which is designed to assess student abilities in mathematics and reading in French, has for the first time delivered an internationally comparable measure around which policy dialogue and international cooperation can aspire to improve. The PASEC 2014 international student assessment was administered in 10 countries in Francophone West Africa (Cameroon, Burundi, Republic of Congo, Côte d’Ivoire, Senegal, Chad, Togo, Benin, Burkina Faso, and Niger).

Une éducation de qualité pour tous : mieux évaluer les progrès en Afrique francophone

Raja Bentaouet Kattan's picture
Also available in: English
 
Si des progrès remarquables ont été accomplis sur le plan de la scolarisation, l’accès de tous les élèves à une éducation de qualité constitue encore un défi de grande ampleur pour les pays d’Afrique de l’Ouest. Photo : Ami Vitale / Banque mondiale


L’accès à une éducation de qualité est l’un des instruments les plus efficaces pour réduire la pauvreté et les inégalités. Il est pourtant loin d’être acquis dans de nombreuses régions du monde. Le Programme d’analyse des systèmes éducatifs (PASEC) a été conçu pour évaluer les acquis scolaires des élèves en mathématiques et en français, et fournir ainsi des données comparatives internationales qui puissent servir de base au dialogue sur l’action à mener et à la coopération internationale. En 2014, dix pays d’Afrique de l’Ouest francophone se sont soumis à ces tests : le Bénin, le Burkina Faso, le Burundi, le Cameroun, la Côte d’Ivoire, le Niger, la République du Congo, le Sénégal, le Tchad et le Togo.

A Global Conversation: What Will It Take to Achieve Learning for All?

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Tomorrow, a Learning for All Ministerial Meeting will bring together development partners and ministers of finance and education from Bangladesh, the DRC, Ethiopia, Haiti, India, Nigeria, Yemen, and South Sudan – home to nearly half of the world’s out-of-school-children – to address challenges and steps to ensure that all children go to school and learn.

Indigenous Peoples, Poverty and Development

Harry A. Patrinos's picture

Blogging from the World Bank's Indigenous Peoples Research Dissemination Workshop in Washington DC.

As is well known, there are more 300 million indigenous peoples in the world.  While they make up fewer than 5 percent of the global population they account for about 10 percent of the world’s poor.  Next year, Cambridge University Press will publish my book with Gillette Hall on the state of the world’s indigenous peoples

As part of the dissemination process, we have brought together most of the contributors to our volume for a workshop in Washington D.C. today, to share their research with each other and with an audience of World Bank staff, researchers and others from the development community. We expect a lively discussion on our forthcoming publication, which covers countries in Latin America, Africa and Asia.