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Teach: Enfrentar a crise da aprendizagem, uma sala de aula de cada vez

Ezequiel Molina's picture
Also available in: French | English | Español | Arabic



Apesar do enorme progresso feito para que mais crianças estejam em sala de aula, estamos no meio de uma crise global de aprendizagem, onde um grande número de crianças conclui o ensino primário sem sequer possuir competencias básicas de literacia e numeraciaO que explica este fenómeno?  Para responder a esta pergunta, considere os seguintes exemplos de salas de aula onde as chances de levar os alunos ao sucesso são improváveis.

Teach: Abordando la crisis de aprendizaje, aula por aula

Ezequiel Molina's picture
Also available in: French | English | Portuguese | Arabic



A pesar del enorme progreso realizado en lograr que haya más niños en el aula, nos encontramos en medio de una crisis global de aprendizaje, donde un gran número de niños finalizan la educación primaria sin siquiera poseer las habilidades básicas de lectura, escritura y aritmética. ¿Qué explica este fenómeno?  Para responder esta pregunta, considere los siguientes ejemplos de aulas donde las posibilidades de éxito de los estudiantes son muy bajas.

Teach: Tackling the learning crisis, one classroom at a time

Ezequiel Molina's picture
Also available in: French | Español | Portuguese | Arabic
 



Despite tremendous progress in getting children into the classroom, we are experiencing a global learning crisis, where a large share of children complete primary school lacking even basic reading, writing, and arithmetic skillsWhat explains this phenomenon? To answer this question, consider the following examples of classrooms that are unlikely to put students on a path to success. 

Student assessment: Supporting the development of human capital

Julia Liberman's picture



At the Annual Meetings of the World Bank Group and International Monetary Fund in Bali, Indonesia, the World Bank highlighted the importance of human capital for economic development.
 
Central to the World Bank’s motivation for the Human Capital Project is evidence that investments in education and health produce better-educated and healthier individuals, as well as faster economic growth and a range of benefits to society more broadly. As part of this effort to accelerate more and better investments in people, the new Human Capital Index provides information on productivity-related human capital outcomes, seeking to answer how much human capital a child born today will acquire by the end of secondary school, given the risks to poor health and education that prevail in the country where she or he was born.

Investing in Early Childhood - What can be done?

Emiliana Vegas's picture

So much has been written recently about the individual, economic and social benefits of investing in early childhood development (ECD), that it is becoming a challenge to summarize these studies. However, ECD is an area that I’m increasingly involved in with my work at The World Bank. Among others, Nobel Laureate Economist, James Heckman and his colleagues have provided very convincing evidence of the benefits of early childhood interventions, including preschool education, on later individual and social outcomes (my colleague and fellow blogger, Jishnu Das looked at Heckman's work in his last blog post "Are Non-Cognitive Gains in Education More Important than Test-Scores?"). These benefits are substantial and varied, ranging from improved education outcomes for the individual, access to better jobs, higher wages, and even lower risks of engaging in criminal activities – which, of course benefits society as a whole.  Moreover, investing early is a better investment than waiting until the child is older, because the costs of achieving comparable benefits through interventions later in life – remedial education in basic education, programs to target at-risk youth, and the like – are so much more costly and also less likely to have an impact.