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Education

Report from Nigeria: Education Needs Intelligent Champions

Elizabeth King's picture


The hall was full all the way to the back and up to the balcony.  The audience was lively, contributing loud asides in their seats, applauding often, cracking inside jokes, and even occasionally arguing directly with those on stage.  You’d think I was at a political rally, but it was the 20th Nigerian Economic Summit in Abuja last month; the theme of the three-day summit was ”transforming education through partnerships for global competitiveness.”

Teaching 21st Century Skills to Ready Students for the World of Work

Mohammed A. Khan's picture


What are the jobs of the future? How can I steer my daughter to a career which offers the best potential for secure employment? If I am honest with her, no one really knows. A decade ago, who had heard of an App Developer or a Chief Listening Officer? These jobs, like so many others, simply didn’t exist.

EdStats: Big Data, Better Policies, Learning for All

Husein Abdul-Hamid's picture

Are we effective in presenting education data to help tackle the real issues that developing countries are facing? The education community continues to be puzzled by two realities: (1) crucial data is often not available and (2) available data is often hard to digest.

Public, Private Secular, and Faith-inspired Schools: How Do They Differ?

Quentin Wodon's picture


In education, perhaps even more than in other social sectors, not every parent is looking for the same standardized service. All parents want their children to learn and benefit from a great education.
 
But for some parents, other dimensions matter as well.  In many developing countries faith and values are important for families and local communities.  It is therefore not surprising that the number of faith-inspired schools appears to be growing, with various types of schools within a tradition providing different services (for example, madrasas usually focus on religious education while Franco-Arab schools also teach secular topics).

The Six A’s of Quality Education

Harry A. Patrinos's picture


Over the past several decades, developing countries have made remarkable progress in achieving quantitative education targets. Since the turn of the millennium, almost 50 million children around the world have gained access to basic education – and most are reaching completion. But as recent PISA data shows, this is not typically the case for qualitative improvements in education. A persistent learning gap remains for an estimated 250 million children who are unable to read and do math, even after spending three or more years in the classroom.

When It Comes To Learning, Education Systems Matter

Elizabeth King's picture


This morning I had the pleasure of delivering the keynote speech at the Education World Forum in London, a large annual gathering of education decision-makers from around the world. More than 80 ministers of education are attending the forum, plus many more high-level participants from donor agencies, private business and academia. I spoke about how much the global education community has to celebrate—the developing world has tripled the average years of schooling of an adult in just two generations, and in the past 15 years the ratio of girls to boys in primary and secondary education rose from 84 to 96 percent—but also about how much there is left to do less than a year to 2015.

Is Finland Still an Education Superstar?

Halsey Rogers's picture

Just hours after the release of PISA test scores last week showed Finland’s students slipping in the international rankings from a ten-year perch at the top, a Finnish headline read “Golden Days Where Finland’s Education A Success Are Over".  The Economist's headline was more concise:  "Finn-ished."  Is it time to relegate Finland to the dustbin of educational history?

PISA Results: Which Countries Improved Most?

Harry A. Patrinos's picture


The headlines started to stream as soon as the PISA results were in: “Asian countries top OECD's latest PISA survey.”  “Poor academic standards.”  “Students score below international averages.”  It depends on the country, of course.  A time to celebrate for some, a time to lament for others.

In Indonesia, Tackling Education Inequality Through Better Governance

Samer Al-Samarrai's picture

Available in Bahasa


Since the UN’s High Level Panel announced  its vision for the post-2015 development agenda in May, much debate has centered on the absence of a goal for inequality among the panel’s list of 15 proposed goals. Indonesian President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono, commenting on the goals in Jakarta last June, stressed that the principle of “no one left behind” was central to the panel’s vision, and that each  of the U.N.’s goals focused on tackling inequality. The proposed education goals, in fact, include a commitment to ‘ensure every child, regardless of circumstance, completes primary education able to read, write and count well enough to meet minimum learning standards’.

Could Do Better! Some Thoughts on a ‘Report Card’ for Global Learning

Marguerite Clarke's picture


I recently came across a report card from my secondary school days in Ireland. It was an interesting read. My progress in areas as diverse as mathematics, singing, Irish language, and physical education was reported on in the form of marks, grades, and narrative feedback. Some teachers provided little information on my learning. Others went into detail. I was impressed by the number of areas in which my progress had been assessed (less so by my lack of singing ability, which, evidently, had been spotted early on!).

Flash forward to 2013, and there is a conversation raging in the development community about how to measure and report on learning globally. A huge concern is the fact that too often children leave school without acquiring the basic knowledge and skills they need to lead productive lives. To make matters worse, there is a global data gap on learning that is impeding efforts to better understand this crisis and how to achieve learning for all.  

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