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Education

Four Education Trends that Countries Everywhere Should Know About

Harry A. Patrinos's picture

Recently, we reached out to education experts around the world to hear what they considered the most pressing issues facing our sector today. Surprisingly, they all said that little has changed in terms of our most common challenges. What was changing, they agreed, were the innovative ways that the global community has begun tackling them.

Cette femme qui cherche des réponses aux problèmes de l’Afrique dans les sciences et les technologies

Ekua Nuama Bentil's picture
Sylvia utilise un séquenceur MinION nanopore, une technologie de séquençage de nouvelle
génération, dans le laboratoire de virologie de l'Université d'Agriculture de Sokoine.

Also available in Francais | English

L’avenir de l’Afrique dépendra de deux dynamiques. Premièrement, de la capacité des pays de cette région à se préparer à la croissance démographique la plus rapide du monde et, deuxièmement, de leur capacité à créer des débouchés pour les jeunes. Selon les estimations, l’Afrique abritera près de 1,7 milliard de personnes d’ici 2030, et plus de la moitié de cette population aura moins de 15 ans. Même si le défi est gigantesque, il représente une opportunité immense pour la région.

The Missing Piece: Disability-Inclusive Education

Charlotte McClain-Nhlapo's picture

In 2015, the world committed to Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 4 to “ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all.” More than an inspirational target, SDG4 is integral to the well-being of our societies and economies – to the quality of life of all individuals.

How Donkey 'School Buses' Benefit Early Grade Children in The Gambia

Alison Marie Grimsland's picture

Rising at 7:00 am to take children to school may seem like a regular activity for many. But what about bringing ALL your community’s youngest children to school, on a donkey cart no less?
 
Every morning, children from the Sinchou Demben village in central Gambia meet Malang Demto. Stick in hand and a smile on his face, he leads them to the closest elementary school, located approximately three kilometers away. Mr. Demto is a farmer who for a little over a year has also overseen the village’s ‘school bus,’ the donkey-pulled cart he drives to Sare Babou.

Teacher Collaboration and Training: Critical Ingredients for Teachers to Grow and Students to Learn

Ellen Whitesides Kalisz's picture

In many ways, Ethiopia’s teacher Continuous Professional Development program is an education specialist’s dream: teachers regularly collaborate with peers, they are mandated to complete 60 hours of professional learning every year, and in some regions, they receive promotions based on performance in the classroom. The structure mirrors many aspects of international best practice and yet the system falters, primarily because it is missing a key ingredient: content.

An Accidental Health Economist Talks Education, Bill Gates, and why Impact Evaluation isn’t Enough

Daphna Berman's picture

Dean Jamison is one of the world’s leading global health economists, but the way he tells it, it was something of an accident. He started as an education economist at the World Bank in 1976, and he was a pioneer in using impact evaluations to study the effectiveness of distributing textbooks in Nicaragua and the Philippines.  Later on, Jamison received an invitation to join the World Bank’s first economic mission to China, where he was tasked with analyzing health issues. “I was eager to see the country and didn’t want to tell anyone how little I knew about health,” he admitted recently.  “But from that point on, I was a health economist.”

The School Leadership Crisis Part 1: Making Principals Work for Schools

Ezequiel Molina's picture
Worldwide, hundreds of millions of children reach young adulthood without acquiring even the most basic skills – a phenomenon dubbed "the global learning crisis." Concurrently, few of the principals who oversee these schools exercise strong management practices, which include setting learning targets, using data to guide instruction, observing classrooms, and providing feedback to teachers.

Facing Forward: Schooling for Learning in Africa

Elizabeth Ninan Dulvy's picture
Also available in: Français
The facts relating to learning outcomes in many countries in the Africa region are depressing and the challenges are immense. But there is a growing body of new evidence from countries across Africa that points to lessons that can be learned about what has worked to improve learning. Together with my co-authors, Sajitha Bashir, Marlaine Lockheed, Jee-Peng Tan and many other contributors, the World Bank has just released a book entitled “Facing Forward: Schooling for Learning in Africa” that focuses on how to improve learning outcomes in basic education —i.e six years of primary and three years of lower secondary education. 
 

Schools are teaching 10 million girls to code; gender equality is a real possibility

Hadi Partovi's picture
Also available in: Français 
Editor's note: This is a guest blog by Hadi Partovi, tech entrepreneur and investor, and CEO of the education non-profit Code.org.
In the last few years, schools globally have made real strides towards gender equality in computer science.
In the last few years, schools globally have made real strides towards gender equality in computer science.  (Photo: Code.org)


Today, for the International Day of Women and Girls in Science, we celebrate the progress made towards reducing the gender gap in computer science, and we urge schools worldwide to help balance the scales in this critical 21st century subject.
 

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