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  • Reply to: Lessons from Ghana: A cost-effective way to train teachers   3 weeks 5 days ago

    Dear Hanne,

    Many thanks for your question. In order to be selected for training, the teacher needed to be:

    1. on the government payroll
    2. teaching at a Ghanaian public school
    3. not more than fifty years of age as of September 1, 2012 (we were worried that older teachers would retire at the end of their four-year training and students wouldn’t be able to benefit from the investment)
    4. Possess any of the following academic qualifications -
    • Senior Secondary School Certificate Examination (SSSCE) - at least a pass in 4 subjects including English and Mathematics
    • West African Senior School Certificate Examination (WASSCE) - at least a pass in English and Mathematics and any other 2 subjects
    • GCE ‘O’ Level - at least a pass in English and Mathematics and any other 2 subjects
    • GCE ‘A’ Level
    • City and Guilds

  • Reply to: Lessons from Ghana: A cost-effective way to train teachers   3 weeks 5 days ago

    Dear Merilyn,

    Thank you for your comments. Yes, I agree that student outcomes will depend on the quality of teacher training. The UTDBE program followed the same curriculum as Ghana’s prevailing pre-service teacher training program taught at the colleges of education. More details on the curriculum can be found in the impact evaluation report referred to in the blog. Revision of the curriculum was beyond the scope of the project.

  • Reply to: Lessons from Ghana: A cost-effective way to train teachers   3 weeks 5 days ago

    Dear Nicole,

    It’s nice to hear from you! It’s been a while! Without question, the contribution of DFID and TED have contributed to the overall success of the program.

    In response to your queries, we are currently in discussion with MoE, TED and the colleges of education regarding the future of UTDBE. Also, teachers at the KG level received training under GPEG. The percentage of trained teachers at the KG level rose from 34 percent to 65 percent in the disadvantaged districts from baseline to endline.

  • Reply to: Education and economic development: Five reforms that have worked   3 weeks 5 days ago

    Thank you Gustavo. These are good points, and I agree. I think Escuela Nueva offers a useful framework through which to see 21st century skills. Incidentally, we will soon be published a major evaluation of the Escuela Nueva experience in Vietnam.

  • Reply to: Education and economic development: Five reforms that have worked   3 weeks 5 days ago

    Good point, thanks for sharing. Growth is a necessary condition.