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Private Sector Development

The Legacy of Saman Kelegama

Sanjay Kathuria's picture
Saman Kelegama, a Sri Lankan economist and the Executive Director of the Institute of Policy Studies (IPS Sri Lanka) died prematurely in June 2017. He was a champion of deeper South Asian cooperation.
Saman Kelegama, a Sri Lankan economist and the Executive Director of the Institute of Policy Studies (IPS Sri Lanka) died prematurely in June 2017. He was a champion of deeper South Asian cooperation. Credit:  Institute of Policy Studies

I first met Saman in the early 1990s in Delhi.  Over the years, our paths diverged.  When I re-engaged on South Asia, I ran into Saman again. We re-connected instantly, despite the long intervening period.  This was easy to do with Saman—soft-spoken, affable, a gentleman to the core.  He bore his considerable knowledge lightly.  

Despite his premature passing away in June 2017, he left a rich and varied legacy behind him. I will confine myself to discussing his insights on regional cooperation in South Asia, based on his public writings and my interactions with him.

Saman was a champion of deeper economic linkages within South Asia. He was also pragmatic. 

Along with a few other regional champions, Saman, as the head of the Institute of Policy Studies in Colombo, helped to kick-start the “South Asian Economic Summit”, or SAES, in Colombo in 2008, to provide a high-profile forum for dialogue on topical issues, especially South Asian regional integration. It is remarkable that the SAES has endured, without any gap. The fact that the policy and academic fraternity meet with unfailing regularity, despite on-and-off political tensions in the region, is testimony to its value.

Saman repeatedly stressed that Sri Lanka has been able to reap benefits from the India-Sri Lanka FTA (ISFTA), contrary to the general belief. His arguments were powerful: the import-export ratio for Sri Lanka improved from 10.3 in 2000 (the start of the ISFTA) to 6.6 in 2015; about 70 percent of Sri Lanka’s exports to India get duty-free access under the FTA, but less than 10 percent of Sri Lanka’s imports from India come under the FTA (since India provided “special and differential treatment” to Sri Lanka).

Six reasons why Sri Lanka needs to boost its ailing private sector

Tatiana Nenova's picture
 Joe Qian / World Bank
A view of the business district in Colombo. Credit: Joe Qian / World Bank

Sri Lanka experienced strong growth at the end of its 26-year conflict. This was to be expected as post-war reconstruction tends to bring new hope and energy to a country.
 
And Sri Lanka has done well—5 percent growth is nothing to scoff at.  
 
However, Sri Lanka needs to create an environment that fosters private-sector growth and creates more and better jobs. To that end, the country should address these 6 pressing challenges:

1. The easy economic wins are almost exhausted

For a long time, the public-sector has been pouring funds into everything from infrastructure to healthcare. Unfortunately, Sri Lanka’s public sector is facing serious budget constraints. The island’s tax to growth domestic product (GDP) ratio is one of the lowest in the world, falling from 24.2% in 1978 to 10.1% in 2014. Sri Lanka should look for more sustainable sources of growth. As in many other countries, the answer lies with the private sector.
 
2. Sri Lanka has isolated itself from global and regional value chains 

Over the past decades, Sri Lanka has lost its trade competitiveness. As illustrated in the graph below, Sri Lanka outperformed Vietnam in the early 1990s on how much of its trade contributed to its growth domestic product. Vietnam has now overtaken Sri Lanka where trade has been harmed by high tariffs and para-tariffs and trade interventions on agriculture.


Sri Lanka dropped down by 14 notches to the 85th position out of 137 in the recent  Global Competitiveness Index.
           
3. The system inhibits private sector growth

Sri Lanka’s private sector is ailing. Sri Lankan companies are entrepreneurial and the country’s young people are smart, inquisitive, and dynamic. Yet, this does not translate into a vibrant private sector. Instead, public enterprises are the ones carrying the whole weight of development in this country.
 
The question is, why is the private sector not shouldering its burden of growth?


From the chart above, you can see how difficult it is to set up and operate a business in Sri Lanka. From paying taxes to enforcing contracts to registering property, entrepreneurs have the deck stacked against them.
 
Trading across borders is particularly challenging for Sri Lankan businesses. Trade facilitation is inadequate to the point of stunting growth and linkages to regional value chains. The chart explains just why Sri Lanka is considered one of the hardest countries in the world to run a trading business. Compare it to Singapore–you could even import a live tiger there without a problem.

Bangladesh corridor vital to India’s ‘Act East’ policy

Sanjay Kathuria's picture
India-Bangladesh land border crossing, Photo by Sanjay Kathuria
India-Bangladesh land border crossing. Credit: Sanjay Kathuria

Deepening connectivity and economic linkages between India and Bangladesh will be critical for the success of India’s ‘Act East’ policy.

Here are five priority areas that have the potential to change the economy of Northeast India:

1. Transport Connectivity

After 1947, Northeast (NE) India has had to access the rest of India largely via the “Chicken’s Neck” near Siliguri, greatly increasing travel times. Traders travel 1600 km from Agartala (Tripura) to Kolkata (West Bengal) via Siliguri to access Kolkata port. Instead, they can travel less than 600 kms to reach the same destination via Bangladesh, or even better, travel only 200 km to access the nearby port of Chittagong in Bangladesh.

This is set to change as close cooperation between Bangladesh and India (including various ongoing initiatives such as the transshipment of Indian goods through Bangladesh’s Ashuganj port to Northeast India, expanding of rail links within Northeast India and between the two countries, the BBIN Motor Vehicles Agreement) can dramatically reduce the cost of transport between Northeast India and the rest of India.

The resultant decline in prices of goods and services can have a strong impact on consumer welfare and poverty reduction in the Northeast. Such cooperation also opens up several additional possibilities of linking India with ASEAN via Myanmar.

Moving forward, expanding direct connectivity between NE India and the rest of India via Bangladesh, while giving Bangladesh similar access to Nepal and Bhutan via India, is critical.

2. Digital Connectivity

Broadband connectivity of 10 gbps is now being provided from Bangladesh’s Cox’s Bazar to Tripura and beyond, to help improve the speed and reliability of internet access in NE India. Bangladesh has the capacity to provide more.

Reforms Sri Lanka needs to boost its economy

Idah Z. Pswarayi-Riddihough's picture
 Joe Qian/World Bank
The Colombo Stock Exchange. Credit: Joe Qian/World Bank

Many Sri Lankans understand the potential benefits of lowering trade costs and making their country more competitive in the global economy. The majority, however, fear increased competition, the unfair advantage of the private sector from abroad and limited skills and innovation to compete.

Yet, Sri Lanka’s aspirations cannot be realized in the current status quo.  

While changes in trade policies and regulations will undeniably improve the lives of most citizens, I’m mindful that some are likely to lose. However, many potential gainers of the reforms who are currently opposed to them are unaware of their benefits.

Implementing smart reforms means that government funds will be used more effectively for the people, improve access to better healthcare, education, basic infrastructure and provide Sri Lankans with opportunities to get more and better jobs. Let me focus on a few reforms that I believe are critical for the country.  First, Sri Lanka needs to seek growth opportunities and foreign investment beyond its borders.    

First, Sri Lanka needs to seek growth opportunities and foreign investment beyond its borders.

Experience shows that no country in the world today has been able to create opportunities for its population entirely within its own geographic boundaries. To succeed in this open environment, Sri Lanka will need to improve its skills base, better understand supply and demand chains as well as produce higher quality goods and services

Experience shows that no country in the world today has been able to create opportunities for its population entirely within its own geographic boundaries. To succeed in this open environment, Sri Lanka will need to improve its skills base, better understand supply and demand chains as well as produce higher quality goods and services.

Fresh thinking on economic cooperation in South Asia

Nikita Singla's picture
 Aamir Khan/ Pakistan, Sreerupa Sengupta/ India, Sanjay Kathuria/ World Bank, Mahfuz Kabir & Surendar Singh/ Bangladesh) Photo By: Marcio De La Cruz/ World Bank
Young Economists sharing the stage with Sanjay Kathuria, Lead Economist and Coordinator, Regional Integration (Left to Right: Aamir Khan/ Pakistan, Sreerupa Sengupta/ India, Sanjay Kathuria/ World Bank, Mahfuz Kabir/Bangladesh & Surendar Singh/ India). Photo by: Marcio De La Cruz/ World Bank


That regional cooperation in South Asia is lower than optimal levels is well accepted. It is usually ascribed to – the asymmetry in size between India and the rest, conflicts and historical political tensions, a trust deficit, limited transport connectivity, and onerous logistics, among many other factors.

Deepening regional integration requires sufficient policy-relevant analytical work on the costs and benefits of both intra-regional trade and investment. An effective cross-border network of young professionals can contribute to fresh thinking on emerging economic cooperation issues in South Asia.

Against this background, the World Bank Group sponsored a competitive request for proposals.  Awardees from Bangladesh, India, and Pakistan, after being actively mentored by seasoned World Bank staff over a period of two years, convened in Washington DC to present their new and exciting research. Research areas included regional value chains, production sharing and the impact assessment of alternative preferential trade agreements in the region.

Young Economists offer fresh thoughts on economic cooperation in South Asia

Mahfuz Kabir, Acting Research Director, Bangladesh Institute of International and Strategic Studies and Surendar Singh, Policy Analyst, Consumer Unity Trust Society (CUTS International) presented their research: Of Streams and Tides, India-Bangladesh Value Chains in Textiles and Clothing (T&C). They focus on how to tackle three main trade barriers for T&C: a) high tariffs for selected, but important goods for the industries of both countries; b) inefficient customs procedures and c) divergent criteria for rules of origin classification.

Sreerupa Sengupta, Ph.D. Scholar at Centre for Economic Studies and Planning, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi discussed Trade Cooperation and Production Sharing in South Asia – An Indian Perspective. Reviewing the pattern of Indian exports and imports in the last twenty years, her research focuses on comparing the Global Value Chain (GVC) participation rate of India with East Asian and ASEAN economies. Barriers to higher participation include a) lack of openness in the FDI sector; b) lack of adequate port infrastructure, and long port dwell times; and c) lack of Mutual Recognition Agreements (MRAs).

Aamir Khan, Assistant Professor, Department of Management Sciences, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad presented his work on Economy Wide Impact of Regional Integration in South Asia - Options for Pakistan. His research analyzes the reasons for Pakistan not being able to take full advantage of its Free Trade Agreement (FTA) with China, and finds that the granting of ASEAN-type concessions to Pakistan in its FTA with China would be more beneficial than the current FTA arrangement. The work also draws lessons for FTAs that are currently being negotiated by South Asian countries.

Sri Lanka: Building a more resilient economy

Smriti Daniel's picture



At the launch of the Sri Lanka Development Update (SLDU), our Twitter chat #SLDU2017: Environmental Benefits of Economic Management set out to explore how Sri Lanka could meet the twin challenges of increasing its physical and financial resilience.
 
The panel comprised experts from the World Bank - Country Director for Sri Lanka and the Maldives, Idah Pswarayi-Riddihough; Senior Economist Ralph van Doorn and senior environmental specialist Darshani De Silva – and Kanchana Wickramasinghe, a research economist in the Institute of Policy Studies. Together, they unpacked the SLDU, discussed its key findings and fielded questions from across the region around its main themes.
 
The bi-annual report, notes key economic developments over the preceding months, placing them in a longer term and global perspective; in the Special Focus section, it explores topics of particular policy significance to Sri Lanka. 
 
Ralph started with the idea that Sri Lanka faces a window of opportunity during which key reforms could transform the country and its economy. He noted that Sri Lanka’s position in the global economy improved its global growth prospects, as well as that of its key export partners. Low commodity prices and the restoration of the GSP+ preferential trade arrangement with the EU had also combined to improve the outlook for the Sri Lankan economy.

For Idah, the country’s mood and the government’s commitment to change were critical to success:   
 
The panel delved into how natural disasters and extreme weather events posed a threat to Sri Lanka’s growing economy. In the short-term the damage was clear and serious, with losses amounting to several billions a year, as Idah noted in her blog. During the chat, she emphasised how Sri Lanka needed to be prepared for future disasters or it would cost the country enormously.
 
Kanchana pointed out that in the long-term, disasters could set back poverty alleviation efforts, especially in agricultural and rural areas, adding:
 

With the chat underway, questions poured in from an online audience who were interested in diverse issues – from managing Sri Lanka’s ongoing drought and its impact on the Northern Province to what insights the SLDU had to offer other countries in the region such as India.

How can digital technology transform lives and improve opportunities in Bhutan?

Yoichiro Ishihara's picture
Tech Park
The recently opened Thimphu tech park – Bhutan’s first IT park -

The Kingdom of Bhutan is a landlocked country located high in the eastern Himalayan mountain range with its population 760,000. Up until about 20 years ago, the country was isolated from the world; Bhutan’s first ever television broadcast occurred in 1999. Since then, information communications technology (ICT) has made rapid advancement. Mobile subscriptions increased from 0.4 per 100 people in 2003 to 87 in 2015. The proportion of people using the internet have increased from 0.1% in 1999 to 40% in 2015. Today, all 20 districts and 201 (out of 205) sub-districts are connected through fiber optic cables.

The World Bank’s 2016 World Development Report on “
Digital Dividends” argues that digital technologies have boosted growth, expanded opportunities, and improved service delivery. Use of ICT for development is especially applicable to small states with populations of less than 1.5 million. Another report, “World Bank Group Engagement with Small States” finds that ICT investments can help reduce economic isolation, lessen barriers to trade, promote tourism, and improve mobility. These messages are highly relevant to Bhutan today.

The Government has enthusiastically adopted the use ICT to improve its services to its citizens as described in Bhutan ICT Roadmap and Bhutan E-Government Masterplan. The Government to Citizen (G2C) program, launched in 2005, provides a one-stop-shop for more than 100 services such as procuring a passport. The national ePayment Gateway Infrastructure, established by the Royal Monetary Authority (RMA), the central bank, has enabled citizens to pay for some public services online. Recently, the National Land Commission (NLC) launched eCitizen Portal - an online one-stop shop for transferring property titles online. This has reduced the number of days to transfer ownership of a property from 90 days to 62 days in the capital, Thimphu. More importantly, the NLC is reaching out to the private sector to seek feedback on how to improve its usability by piloting a feedback survey using an Interactive Voice Response (IVR) tool for the first time in Bhutan. The government has also introduced an electronic government procurement system (e-GP) to make optimal use of resources. Given the size of the budget (exceeding 30 percent of GDP), the adoption of e-GP will contribute to effective use of public resources. The World Bank Group has been supporting these efforts through various instruments such as the second Development Policy Credit: Fiscal Sustainability and Investment Climate, which helped get the eCitizen Portal off the ground.

Can small grants, training, and mentorship for micro-entrepreneurs create jobs in Afghanistan?

Pratap Sinha's picture
Also available in: دری | پښتو
The NATEJA project supports entrepreneurs like Nooria to start new business. "With support from NATEJA, we were able to purchase the required equipment and
raw material to weave the carpets ourselves," said Nooria. Photo Credit: Rumi Consultancy/ World Bank


As the world marks International Youth Day on August 12, many in Afghanistan, especially the youth, strive to find better ways to make a prosperous future for themselves. According to the United Nations Population Fund, about 63 percent of Afghans are under 25 years of age, reflecting a steep pyramid age structure whereby a large cohort of young people is slowly emerging. Yet, young people in Afghanistan face significant challenges in health, education, employment, and gender inequality.

To tackle these challenges, the Ministry of Labor, Social Affairs, Martyrs and Disabled is targeting youth with low education in rural and semi-urban areas through a pilot micro-grants scheme to support aspiring entrepreneurs in the face of low growth and dim job creation prospects in the private sector. The scheme is implemented under the Non-Formal Approach to Training, Education, and Jobs in Afghanistan (NATEJA) project financed by the Afghanistan Reconstruction Trust Fund (ARTF).

When I saw Fariha, 23, during her selection interview for the micro-grant scheme, she was sceptical of receiving any government support, but confident about her beauty salon idea. It was a dream come true when she got the news of the micro-grant of $500. Fariha had learnt her skills first as a trainee at a beauty salon. After four years working there, she used the grant money to invest in the business and is now a partner and manager in the salon. “I did not earn enough as a trainee, but now I am a partner. It is a good job and it is getting better,” she says.

As a NATEJA grantee, Fariha attended a business training course to learn basic accounting, marketing, and key tips to start a business as a woman. She was also very happy to receive a pictorial, practical, and illustrative business start-up booklet at the training, given her low level of education.

آیا کمک های مالی کوچک، آموزش و ارایه توصیه ها و مشوره ها برای متشبثین کوچک می تواند فرصتهای کاریابی را در افغانستان ایجاد کند؟

Pratap Sinha's picture
Also available in: English | پښتو
نوریه یکی ازمتشبثین که با حمایت برنامه نتیجه دستگاه  قالین بافی  خودش را فعال کرده است میگوید" با حمایت برنامه نتیجه اکنون ما توانستیم وسایل مورد نیاز و مواد خام خریداری نمایم و بعد ازآن برای خود قالین ببافیم. عکاسی: شرکت مشورتی رومی/بانک جهانی

همان طوری که جهانیان ۱۲ ماه اگست را همه ساله به عنوان روز جهانی جوانان تجلیل مینماید، اکثریت اقشار جامعه افغانستان، بالخصوص طبقه جوان، تلاش می نمایند، تا راه های بهتر و مناسب برای یک آینده درخشان  و موفق را برای خودشان جستجو و دریافت نمایند. براساس معلومات صندوق جمعیت سازمان ملل متحد، در حدود ۶۳ فیصد نفوس افغانستان زیر سن ۲۵ سال قرار دارند که این حالت ساختار اهرم شیب دار (steep pyramid) را با در نظرداشت سن نفوس کشور به تصویر کشیده و انعکاس دهنده افزایش سریع رشد قشر جوان در کشور میباشد. این در حالیست که جوانان افغان بطور قابل ملاحظه­ با چالشها و مشکلات جدی در عرصه های  صحت، تعلیم و تربیه، فرصتهای کاریابی و نابرابری های جنسیتی مواجه  میباشند.

جهت رسیده گی به این چالش ها، وزارت کار، امور اجتماعی، شهدا و معلولین، طبقه  جوان مناطق روستایی و نیمه شهری که سطح تعلیم بلند ندارند، را تحت پوشش برنامه آزمایشی فراهم نمودن کمکهای مالی کوچک بلاعوض قرار داده است. قابل یادآوریست که هدف این کمک مالی کوچک و بلاعوض با در نظرداشت رشد ضعیف اقتصادی وچشم انداز نامطلوب، ایجاد فرصت های شغلی در سکتور خصوصی آنعده جوانانی را که علاقمند ایجاد تشبث / اشتغال خودی اند، مورد حمایت قرار میدهد. این برنامه تحت پروژه نتیجه به کمک مالی صندوق بازسازی افغانستان تطبیق میگردد.

زمانی که من، فریحه ۲۳ ساله، را هنگام مصاحبه انتخاب متشبثین به منظور دستیابی به کمکهای مالی کوچک بلاعوض را ملاقات کردم، در مورد دریافت هر گونه حمایت از طرف دولت در حالت شک و تردید قرار داشت، اما در مورد آینده و راه اندازی آرایشگاهء خودش اطمینان خاطر داشت.  این رویای فریحه، بعد از دریافت خبر کمک مالی کوچک بلا عوض (۵۰۰ دالر امریکایی) تحقق یافت. فریحه، در ابتدا به مدت چهار سال به عنوان شاگرد در یک سالون آرایش مهارتهای لازم را آموخت. اکنون با استفاده از  این کمک مالی برای سرمایه گذاری در کسب و کار خود استفاده نمود و در حال حاضر وی یک شریک و مدیر سالون آرایشگری خود میباشد. وی میگوید: "من به عنوان شاگرد درآمد کافی نداشتم، اما در حال حاضر من یک شریک هستم. این کار خوبی است و در حال بهتر شدن میباشد."

فریحه، به عنوان یکی از مستفید شوندگان کمک مالی کوچک بلاعوض پروژه نتیجه، در کورسهای آموزش انکشاف تشبثات بمنظور آموزش  حسابداری مقدماتی، بازاریابی و همچنین نکات کلیدی برای آغاز کسب و کار/ تشبث به عنوان یک زن اشتراک کرد. او همچنان از دریافت کتاب های تصویری مشرح و کارهای عملی  بخاطر آغاز تشبث در جریان کورس و از اینکه معلومات مقدماتی در این زمینه ها برایش ارائه گردیده است،  بسیار خوشحال میباشد.

آیا د متشبثینو لپاره کوچنۍ مالي مرستې، زدکړې، سپارښتنې او هغوی ته سلا مشورې کولای شي، څو په افغانستان کې کاري فرصتونه رامنځته کړي؟

Pratap Sinha's picture
Also available in: English | دری
نوریه یوه له هغو متشبثو مېرمنو څخه چې د نتیجه برنامې په مرستې یې خپله د قالینو د اوبدولو دستګاه فعاله کړې، وايي: " د نتیجه برنامې په مرسته اوسمهال موږ وتوانېدلو، چې خپل د اړتیا وړ وسایل او اومه مواد وپیرو او وروسته له دې ځان ته غالۍ تولید کړو." عکاسي: د رومی مشورتي شرکت/ نړیوال بانک

څرنګه چې نړیوال هر کال د اګسټ میاشتې ۱۲مه نیټه د ځوانانو نړیوالې ورځې په توګه نمانځي، د افغانستان ډیری خلک، په ځانګړې توګه ځوان نسل هڅه کوي، څو د خپل ځان لپاره د ځلانده او بریالي راتلونکي په موخه غوره او مناسبه لارې وپلټي او ومومي. د ملګرو ملتونو د وګړیو صندوق د معلوماتو پر بنسټ، د افغانستان شاوخوا ۶۳ سلنه وګړي د ۲۵ کلنو څخه لږ عمر لري، چې دغه حالت د افغانستان وګړي د سن پر بنسټ د شیب لرونکي هرم (steep pyramid) جوړښت په بڼه انځور شوی او دا په چټکۍ سره په هېواد کې د ځوان نسل د زیاتیدو ښکارندوي کوي. دا په داسې حال کې ده، چې افغان ځوانان د روغتیا، ښوونې او روزنې، کاري فرصتونو او جنسیتي نا انډول په برخو کې له سختو ستونزو او خنډونو سره مخ دي.

د دې ستونزو د حل په موخه د کار، ټولنیزو چارو، شهیدانو او معلولینو وزارت د کلیوالو او دویمه درجه ښارونو هغه ځوان نسل، چې د زدکړو کچه یې ټیټه ده، د خپل وړیا مالي مرستو آزمایښتي پروګرام تر پوښښ لاندې نیولي. د یادولو وړ ده، چې د کمزوري اقتصادي ودې او ناڅرګند لیدلوري ته په کتو د دغه کوچني او بلاعوضه مالي مرستې موخه دا ده، څو هغه ځوانان، چې غواړي پانګونه وکړي یا هم د ځان لپاره کار وکړي، د هغوی لپاره په خصوصي سکتور کې کاري موقع برابره کړي او ملاتړ یې وکړي. دا برنامه د افغانستان د بیارغونې صندوق په مالي مرستې د نتیجه پروژې تر پوښښ لاندې پلي کیږي.

کله چې ما، ۲۳ کلنه فریحه د کوچنیو وړیا مالي مرستو ترلاسه کولو لپاره د مرکې پر مهال ولیدله، د دولت لخوا یې هر ډول مالي ملاتړ ته د شک په سترګه کتل، خو د خپلې سینګارتون د راتلونکي او پرانیستلو په اړه یې ډاډ درلود. د فریحې دا هیله وروسته له هغه بشپړه شوه، چې د کوچنی وړیا مالي مرستې (۵۰۰ امریکایي ډالره) د ترلاسه کولو خبر یې ترلاسه کړ. فریحې، په لومړیو کې په یوه سینګارتون کې زدکوونکې وه او هلته یې اړین مهارتونه زده کړل. اوسمهال نوموړې له دې مالې مرستې څخه په خپل کسب او کار کې ګټه اخلي او اوسمهال هغه د خپل سینګارتون یوه شریکه ده او مشري یې هم کوي. هغه وايي: " ما د زده کوونکي په توګه په کافي اندازه عواید نه لرل، خو اوسمهال زه په دې کار کې شریکه یم. دا ښه کار دی او د پرمختګ په حال کې دی."

فریحه، د نتیجه پروژې د کوچنیو وړیا مالي مرستو د ګټه اخیستونکي په توګه؛ د لومړنیو مالي زدکړو، بازار موندنې او همدارنګه د کسب او کار او پانګونې لپاره د اړینو موضوع ګانو د زده کولو په موخه د تشبثاتو د پراختیا په ښوونیز پروګرام کې د یوې ښځې په توګه ګډون کړی وو. نوموړې همدارنګه له دې امله هم خوشحاله ښکاري، چې د ښوونیز پروګرام پر مهال یې د تشبث پیلولو په موخه انځوریز کتابونه ترلاسه کړي او عملي کارونو کې یې ګډون کړی او همدارنګه په دې برخه کې یې لومړني معلومات ترلاسه کړي دي.

فریحه د سلګونو ښځو په منځ کې هغه څوک ده، چې د نتیجه پروژې له لارې یې د مالي مرستو ترلاسه کولو لپاره غوره شوې او له دې لارې یې زدکړې کړي دي. تر اوسه له ۱۷۰۰۰ زره غوښتونکیو څخه شاوخوا ۲۵۰۰ کوچنیو سوداګرو د نتیجه پروژې له لارې کوچني بلاعوضه مالي مرستې ترلاسه کړي دي. د دې متشبثینو شاوخوا ۳۰ سلنه ښځې دي. د یادولو وړ ده، چې دا پروژه په کابل، ننګرهار او بلخ ولایتونو کې پلي شوې ده.
 

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