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#WomensDay2016

The tyranny of the kitchen spoon for Sri Lanka’s women

Dileni Gunewardena's picture
Sri Lankan woman washing lentils ahead of preparing a meal
Sri Lankan woman washing lentils ahead of preparing a meal. Credit: Simone D. McCourtie/World Bank

A common Sri Lankan proverb states that a woman’s wisdom only extends to the length of the kitchen spoon’s handle. With near universal female lower secondary school completion, and more girls than boys receiving tertiary education, the knowledge of Sri Lankan females has clearly moved beyond the length of the kitchen spoon’s handle. However, the evidence suggests that ties to the kitchen spoon may still be keeping Sri Lankan women out of the workforce.

Sri Lanka’s population has more women than men; there are 106 women for every 100 men. But when it comes to the labour force, there are only 54 women per 100 men, and 52 women employed for every 100 employed men. In the last 10 years, the female labour force participation rate has declined slightly from 39.5 percent to 34.7 percent, and the female unemployment rate has been consistently twice that of males during this period or longer[1] So why aren’t Sri Lankan women – who are on average more educated than Sri Lankan men – engaged in the labor force in similar proportions? This question has been raised and discussed in policy circles, gaining momentum in recent times.
 
 

インド:防災面で広がる女性の役割

Malini Nambiar's picture
Also available in: English
Women community leaders
女性コミュニティーのリーダー達。 写真: World Bank


【概要】

3月8日は国際女性の日だ。インドにおいて女性は伝統的に家庭を守る立場であることから、防災面での役割は見過ごされてきた。しかし、インドの沿岸地域を バスで巡り、各地の防災プロジェクトを支援する「強靭性構築への道(Road to Resilience)」プログラムを通じ、防災面でいかに女性がリーダー的役割を果たしているかが見えてきた。

これは、世界銀行と防災グローバル・ファシリティ(GFDRR)が支援する、インド沿岸部地域の脆弱性改善と防災対策を目的とした、国立サイクロンリスク軽減プログラムと沿岸災害リスク軽減プログラムの成果のひとつである。

しかし、女性は家庭内役割を担うべきという見方がまだ根強く、女性の能力を生かすことは難しいのが実情だ。この旅を通じて、女性を意思決定に巻き込むことが、個人の災害対応力育成につながるだけではなく、女性の力を活かした地域全体の防災力向上につながると考えている。

 
Road2Resilienceプログラム: 復興への道 (英語) 

The growing role of women in disaster risk management

Malini Nambiar's picture
Also available in: 日本語
Women Community Leaders
Women community leaders. Photo Credit: World Bank


Women are seen in their traditional role of home-makers, but might their ability to take on managerial roles in disaster risk management be underestimated?
 
As part of the India Disaster Risk Management team, I travelled on the “Road2Resilience” bus journey along the entire coast of India. Along with the team’s mission to provide implementation support to the six coastal disaster management projects, I also focused on women’s participation in the mitigation activities of these projects.
 
Women’s participation in Disaster Risk Management in India has been sporadic. However, my interactions with the community - especially women - highlighted how women in coastal India are seriously taking disaster risk management into their own hands.