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Georgia

A dream come true! Georgian nationals can now travel visa-free to most EU countries

Ana Chechelashvili's picture
 
Nadikvari Park, Georgia
Nadikvari Park autumn festivities, Kakheti region of Georgia
Photo: Leonid Mujiri / World Bank



























A huge wave of celebration engulfed Georgia recently because, on March 28th, 2017, Georgians gained visa-free travel to most EU countries. This is a significant achievement for the country, 26 years after independence was restored.

Visa-free travel is one of the most tangible benefits for every citizen of Georgia, obtained from the Association Agreement signed with the European Union in June 2014. This agreement will contribute to Georgia’s gradual economic integration into the EU Internal Market, notably through establishing a Deep and Comprehensive Free Trade Area.
 

On the road in Georgia – through past, present and future

Mercy Tembon's picture
A handmade map of Georgia




















What an experience! It started bright and early on a Thursday morning as we boarded the car in the basement of the Word Bank office in Tbilisi and set off for a two-day visit to the Imereti region in the west of Georgia.

The first stop along our route was the Gelati Monastic Complex – a UNESCO World Heritage Site – which is an impressive conservation and restoration project supported through the World Bank’s Second Regional Development Project (RDP), the US Ambassador’s Fund for Cultural Preservation and the State Municipal Development Fund of Georgia. Our contribution is to help build infrastructure around the monastic complex that will facilitate tourist access to this historical site, and by consequence help further develop the local economy.

Beyond celebrating – Removing barriers for women in the South Caucasus

Mercy Tembon's picture
Georgia kindergarten
























After seventeen months in the South Caucasus, I have learnt a lot from colleagues in the countries of Armenia, Azerbaijan and Georgia about this day, March 8th. It is considered one of the most grandiose days of the calendar – when women and girls of all ages are acknowledged and showered with flowers and gifts of various kinds. Gifts range from a handmade card or a trinket to a bunch of violets or mimosa flowers. Older women might receive a bottle of French perfume, cosmetics, cutlery, crockery or other household items.

On March 8th, it is a common occurrence to see street vendors selling flowers in abundance, and shops are mainly full of male customers. The most important gift is that, on this day, men are also supposed to do all the house chores, so that on this day at least, women can forget about dishes, cooking and childcare, and enjoy some well-deserved time off! In a nutshell, it is a day of paying tribute to women everywhere – in homes, classrooms, and workplaces.

Getting further down the road – Improving the quality of education in Georgia

Nino Kutateladze's picture
Young student in Georgia

Educational change is a complex endeavor for any country – especially in the context of social, economic and political transition, not to mention globalization. And Georgia is no exception.
 
The country’s path toward systematic education reform began in the 1990s and has been long and significant – indeed, it has undergone a paradigm shift since the days of the Soviet system. Today, Georgia’s education curriculum and standards are far more advanced, the allocation of educational resources is more efficient and transparent, and major improvements have been implemented with regard to regulation and management of the education sector overall.
 
Education reforms have had an especially noticeable impact on the financing and governance of Georgia’s educational institutions. The words “corruption” and “nepotism” are no longer used when describing the education sector – a far cry from the early 1990s when they were considered the most pressing issues facing the sector.
 
Today, Georgia’s education sector faces different challenges, however – which have largely to do with the quality of education. Important questions revolve around the relevance of the skills, knowledge and attitudes learned at school: are they fully compatible with the needs of the country’s growing economy and with the competitive global economy of the 21st century? And if not, why not?

Assessing disaster risk in Europe and Central Asia – what did we learn?

Alanna Simpson's picture
Heavy rains on June 13-14, 2015 caused a 1 million cubic-meter landslide to flow down the Vere River valley and damage the capital city of Tbilisi, Georgia. (Photo via Wikimedia Commons)
Across the Europe and Central Asia region today, policymakers are confronted daily with a wide range of development challenges and decisions, but the potential impacts of adverse natural events and climate change – such as earthquakes or flooding – may not always be first and foremost in their thoughts.

Admittedly, the region does not face the same daunting disaster risks as some other parts of the world – especially in South Asia, East Asia and Latin America – but nevertheless, it is far from immune to the effects of natural hazards – as the past clearly reminds us.

Improving fairness, opportunity and empowerment: A view from the South Caucasus

Genevieve Boyreau's picture
Also available in: Русский
I was quite intrigued by the findings of the latest Europe and Central Asia Economic Update, with its special focus on "Polarization and Populism". As Program Leader for the South Caucasus region, covering Azerbaijan, Armenia and Georgia, I was particularly interested in the fact that these three countries report the highest levels of life and job dissatisfaction, despite declining disparities and overall income improvement in the region (in Georgia, for instance). Indeed, using the World Bank’s "twin goal” metrics, the South Caucasus region has been performing reasonably well.

People’s living standards – do numbers tell the whole story?

Giorgia DeMarchi's picture
Also available in: Русский
Numbers don’t lie. That’s why, in our day-to-day lives, we rely heavily on numbers from household surveys, from national accounts, and from other traditional sources to describe the world around us: to calculate, to compare, to measure, to understand economic and social trends in the countries where we work.

But do we perhaps rely too much on numbers to gain an understanding of people’s lives and the societies in which they live? Do numbers really tell us the whole story, or give us the full picture?


 

საქართველოში ინოვაციების დანერგვის პარალელურად დღემდე გაუხმაურებელი ნიჭი ვლინდება

Tako Kobakhidze's picture
Also available in: English | Русский
Tech Park Georgia

მთაწმინდის წვერზე, რომელიც საქართველოს დედაქალაქს გადმოჰყურებს, ქვეყნის ინოვაციური მომავალი იქმნება. აქ აწმყო ხვდება მომავალს.

დღეს სურვილი მაქვს საქართველოს ტექნოპარკის შესახებ მოგითხროთ.

ახლახანს ტექნოპარკს მსოფლიო ბანკის წარმომადგენელ ჩემს კოლეგებთან ერთად ვეწვიე. მას ზედამხედველობას საქართველოს ინოვაციისა და ტექნოლოგიების სააგენტო (GITA) უწევს. ჩვენ იქ ყოფილმა კოლეგამ, ამჟამად კი სააგენტოს საერთაშორისო ურთიერთობების განყოფილების ხელმძღვანელმა, მარიამ ლაშხმა გვიმასპინძლა.

მარიამმა, რომელიც ჯერ კიდევ მსოფლიო ბანკში საქმიანობისას საქართველოს კონკურენტუნარიანობის და ინოვაციის პროექტის შემუშავებაში იყო ჩართული, მოკლედ გაგვაცნო სააგენტოს ისტორია. ის 2013 წელს იწყება.

 

As Georgia innovates, hidden talents are revealed

Tako Kobakhidze's picture
Also available in: Русский | Georgian
Tech Park Georgia

​On top of Mount Mtatsminda, overlooking Georgia’s capital city of Tbilisi, the country’s future innovation is being prepared as today meets tomorrow.

Let me tell you about Tech Park of Georgia!

I recently visited there with some World Bank colleagues. We were hosted by Mariam Lashkhi, a former colleague who now leads the Department of International Relations at Georgia’s Innovation and Technology Agency (GITA) overseeing the Tech Park. Mariam, who was involved in the development of Georgia’s Competitiveness and Innovation Project while at the Bank, gave us a brief history of GITA, created in 2013.

It all began with an idea to support Georgia’s government and the private sector in advancing innovation-led growth of key sectors of economy. Ultimately, the goal was to drive competitiveness and ensure longer-term sustainable growth, with a focus on job creation.

ციფრული რევოლუციის, უნარებისა და კომუნიკაციების მომავლის შესახებ

Tako Kobakhidze's picture
Also available in: English

 

WDR2016
ინფორმაციისა და კომუნიკაციების სფეროში კაცობრიობის ისტორიაში ჯერ არნახული უდიდესი რევოლუცია ხდება. მართალია, ამ ფრაზის ავტორი მე არ ვარ, მაგრამ სრულიად ვეთანხმები მას. სწორედ ამ წინადადებამ მიბიძგა წამეკითხა დოკუმენტის „მსოფლიოს განვითარების ანგარიში -2016: ციფრული დივიდენდები“ სრული მიმოხილვა.
 
ყოველთვის მაინტერესებდა, რას ნიშნავს სინამდვილეში ციფრული რევოლუცია. ვის, თუ არა ნახსენები ანგარიშის თანაავტორს შეეძლო ამ კითხვაზე პასუხის გაცემა! დიახ, გასულ კვირას შესაძლებლობა მომეცა, ინტერვიუ ჩამეწერა თბილისში მყოფ უვე დაიხმანთან. ის საქართველოს  8 აპრილს ეწვია „როუდშოუს“ ფარგლებში მსოფლიო ბანკის ჯგუფის მიერ განხორციელებული სამუშაოს წარსადგენად მთავრობის, ბიზნესის, აკადემიური წრეების, სტუდენტების და სხვა დაინტერესებული აუდიტორიის წინაშე ბიზნეს ფორუმზე: ინოვაცია და ციფრული ეკონომიკა.

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