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Што се случува ако не ја платите својата сметка? Извлечени поуки од централна и источна Европа

Georgia Harley's picture
Also available in: English


Сите ние имаме редовни сметки за плаќање за сеприсутните услуги кои ги трошиме – било да се работи за комунални услуги (вода, затоплување, електрична енергија итн.), кредитни картички, членства или отплати за автомобили.  Но, не сите ги плаќаат своите сметки.

Во целата економија овие неплатени сметки се претвораат во милиони предмети за извршување од мала вредност, кои честопати се неспорни. На економијата ѝ е потребен систем кој брзо, евтино и првично може да се справи со ваквиот долг.  Доколку системот за наплата на долгови потфрли тоа доведува до низа системски проблеми кои постепено ги задушуваат како судовите така и целата економија. 

Во неколку земји каде што работиме во Европа – главно во средна, јужна и источна Европа – судовите се заглавени со огромен број на заостанати предмети од ваков вид. Сепак, некои од нивните соседи успеале да го решат проблемот. 

Зошто луѓето не плаќаат? Зошто некои земји се подобри во оваа работа од другите?  И што може да се направи за да се подобрат системите за наплата на долговите?

What happens if you don’t pay your bill? Lessons from Central and Eastern Europe

Georgia Harley's picture
Also available in: Македонски


We all have regular bills to pay for the ubiquitous services we consume – whether they be for utilities (water, heating, electricity etc.), credit cards, memberships, or car payments.  But, not everyone pays.  

So why don’t people pay?  Why are some countries better at this than others?  And what can be done to improve systems for debt collection?

The economic benefits of LGBTI inclusion

Georgia Harley's picture
Civil Rights Defenders/Photo: Vesna Lalic
Civil Rights Defenders/Photo: Vesna Lalic
Discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) people is an all too familiar story. Members of this community are frequent targets of violence and other human rights abuses, and often face prejudice and hardship at work, in their communities, and at home.

Action is needed to address these problems and ensure that everyone – regardless of race, gender, age, sexual orientation, or gender identity - has an equal chance to live a healthy and prosperous life
This is not only the right thing to do, it also makes economic sense: a growing body of evidence indicates that discrimination against LGBTI people has a negative economic impact on society.

Don’t sweat the small stuff – lessons from European courts

Georgia Harley's picture

Last year, we posted a blog – Resolving Minor Disputes Matters Big Time for the Poor – which highlighted how courts can fast-track minor disputes to deliver faster, cheaper and more appropriate justice and how – for the poor and for micro and small businesses – this may be their only path to justice. 

Increasingly, citizens and businesses demand fast-tracking services for small cases and, according to Doing Business data, 138 economies have a small claims procedure of some kind. So courts across the world are eager to learn how to roll out such reforms – either to introduce a fast track procedure or to improve on an existing one.

Inspecting Poland's inspections

Maciej Drozd's picture


According to the World Bank’s Doing Business report, Poland ranked 74th globally in the ease of doing business in 2006. It took 10 procedures to incorporate a business in Warsaw, more than 40 steps to pay taxes, close to 200 days to register property, and almost 1,000 days to enforce a contract. A decade later, Poland ranked 24th, higher than the EU average – progress unmatched by any high-income country in terms of ease of doing business.

Poland has been one of the most active and steady reformers of its business environment in the world, but firms are yet to benefit from reforming the country’s burdensome business inspections.

Assessing disaster risk in Europe and Central Asia – what did we learn?

Alanna Simpson's picture
Heavy rains on June 13-14, 2015 caused a 1 million cubic-meter landslide to flow down the Vere River valley and damage the capital city of Tbilisi, Georgia. (Photo via Wikimedia Commons)
Across the Europe and Central Asia region today, policymakers are confronted daily with a wide range of development challenges and decisions, but the potential impacts of adverse natural events and climate change – such as earthquakes or flooding – may not always be first and foremost in their thoughts.

Admittedly, the region does not face the same daunting disaster risks as some other parts of the world – especially in South Asia, East Asia and Latin America – but nevertheless, it is far from immune to the effects of natural hazards – as the past clearly reminds us.

To reinvigorate Europe, we need more integration… of services

Doerte Doemeland's picture
Also available in: Русский | Română


To reinvigorate growth in Europe, European Central Bank President Mario Draghi called for more common projects in the European Union (EU). And he emphasized that these efforts need to meet a set of minimum bars: they should “…focus on those actions that deliver tangible and immediately recognisable results… [they] should complement the actions of governments; they should be clearly linked to people’s immediate concerns; they should unequivocally concern matters of European or global significance.”

We couldn’t agree more.

Securing Serbia’s farming future

Bekzod Shamsiev's picture
A farmer in pepper greenhouse, Central Serbia.
Photo: Jutta Benzenberg/World Bank
As Serbia moves to join the European Union, smallholder farmers like Goran Matic are concerned about the challenges of integrating with a highly competitive market of half-a-billion consumers. He is not alone. Many farmers throughout southeastern Europe are asking whether family farms can compete with commercial farms and agribusiness conglomerates and whether “farming heritage" as we know it can survive.
 
There are no simple answers.
 
The opportunities and challenges of EU accession
When economies integrate with foreign markets, trading opportunities, consumer choices and knowledge and technology exchanges increase. However, openness also exerts pressures on industries – including farming – to improve productivity in order to remain in business. Serbia finds itself at this very juncture. The decision to join the European Union (EU) and integrate with the EU’s highly competitive single market of 500 million consumers has raised the stakes for its economy overall, but especially agriculture.

Îmbunătățirea oportunităților pentru copii romi va aduce beneficii

Mariam Sherman's picture
Also available in: English | Русский
Roma child, Romania. Photo by Jutta Benzenberg

La opt ani de la debutul crizei economice globale, aproape un sfert din populația Uniunii Europene este în continuare expusă la riscul de sărăcie sau excluziune socială. Însă un anumit grup iese în evidență: Populația romă din Europa care este marginalizată și al cărui număr este în creștere.

Cifra echivalentă pentru copii romi are un nivel de 85% în Europa Centrală și de Sud-Est. Condițiile de trai ale populației rome marginalizate din această regiune seamănă adesea cu cele din țările mai puțin dezvoltate, decât cu cele la care ne-am aștepta în Europa.

Improving opportunities for Europe’s Roma children will pay off

Mariam Sherman's picture
Also available in: Română | Русский
Roma child, Romania. Photo by Jutta Benzenberg

Eight years on from the start of the global economic crisis, close to one quarter of the European Union’s population remains at risk of poverty or social exclusion. But one group in particular stands out: Europe’s growing and marginalized Roma population.

The equivalent figure for Roma children stands at 85 percent in Central and Southeastern Europe. Living conditions of marginalized Roma in this region are often more akin to those in least developed countries than what we expect in Europe.

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