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disaster risk management

Back to school? Expanding access to disaster-resilient schools in Turkey for Syrian children and host communities

Johannes Zutt's picture
Also available in: Türkçe | Русский


Today, Turkey hosts more refugees than any other single country—almost 3.3 million. The vast majority are fleeing the civil war in Syria, and almost half are under the age of 18. A devastating consequence of the children’s flight is the disruption of their education, with about one in four Syrian refugee children in Turkey—mostly in urban areas in southeastern and southern provinces—not in school.  Even so, due to tremendous efforts by the government of Turkey, about six in ten school-aged Syrian children now have access to either formal education facilities or temporary education centers in Turkey—a remarkable achievement, given the scale of the need and the rapidity with which it developed.

By the end of 2017, the Government aims to achieve full educational enrollment for all Syrian children.

Proaktivan pristup u hvatanju ukoštac sa klimatskim ekstremima u Srbiji

Darko Milutin's picture
Also available in: English | Русский


Žestok i dugotrajni talas vrućina je ovog leta pogodio dobar deo centralne Evrope, uzrokujući deformacije šina na prugama u Srbiji i primoravajući najmanje 10 zemalja da proglase crveni meteoalarm zbog opasnosti po zdravlje stanovništva i štednje vode. Nekada retka neprijatnost, ekstremne vremenske pojave kao što je ova postaju sve uobičajenije u čitavom regionu – i sve opasnije.

Ovi izazovi su podstakli Vladu Srbije da tokom poslednjih nekoliko godina usvoji aktivan pristup građenju otpornosti na klimatske rizike i rizike od katastrofa.

Taking a proactive approach to climate extremes in Serbia

Darko Milutin's picture
Also available in: Српски | Русский

A severe and prolonged heat wave stifled much of Central Europe this summer, buckling train tracks in Serbia and forcing at least 10 countries to issue red alerts for health concerns and water conservation. Once a rare nuisance, extreme weather events like this are becoming more commonplace throughout the region – and more dangerous.

These challenges have prompted the government of Serbia to take a proactive approach to building resilience to climate and disaster risks over the last few years.

Assessing disaster risk in Europe and Central Asia – what did we learn?

Alanna Simpson's picture
Heavy rains on June 13-14, 2015 caused a 1 million cubic-meter landslide to flow down the Vere River valley and damage the capital city of Tbilisi, Georgia. (Photo via Wikimedia Commons)
Across the Europe and Central Asia region today, policymakers are confronted daily with a wide range of development challenges and decisions, but the potential impacts of adverse natural events and climate change – such as earthquakes or flooding – may not always be first and foremost in their thoughts.

Admittedly, the region does not face the same daunting disaster risks as some other parts of the world – especially in South Asia, East Asia and Latin America – but nevertheless, it is far from immune to the effects of natural hazards – as the past clearly reminds us.

Risk in Vienna City Hall

Joaquin Toro's picture
 
The Vienna City Hall (Rathaus) is one of the landmarks of the Austrian Capital. Visitors are amazed by its Gothic architecture and magnificent interiors - which are famous for hosting lavish events and balls. However, perhaps in direct contrast to these types of events, the Wappensaal of the Rathaus hosted the first ever Understanding Risk Austria event.

Where in the 18th century these halls hosted the Viennese bourgeoisie, in January these halls now received disaster risk management professionals, decision makers, policy makers, technical institutions, and representatives from the private sector, NGOs and academic institutions from around Austria to discuss disaster risk management issues in the country.

This demonstration of support for GFDRR and the Understanding Risk brand was an important step in further integrating the rich experience of DRM that Austria offers the global UR community.