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Sustainable Communities

Jeta në margjina: përvoja e personave LGBTI në Evropën Juglindore

Linda Van Gelder's picture
Also available in: English | Bosanski | Русский


Në Bankën Botërore, e dimë se përfshirja sociale nuk është vetëm gjëja e duhur, por edhe ekonomikisht gjëja më e mençur për ta bërë. Shoqëritë më përfshirëse kanë më shumë gjasa që ta shfrytëzojnë më së miri kapitalin njerëzor. Qytetet më të hapura dhe më përfshirëse kanë më shumë gjasa për ta tërhequr kapitalin dhe talentin ndërkombëtar. Shtetet më të hapura dhe më përfshirëse janë destinacione më tërheqëse për turistët ndërkombëtarë.

2,300 persona LGBTI nga Shqipëria, Bosnja dhe Hercegovina, Kroacia, Kosova, Ish Republika Jugosllave e Maqedonisë, Mali i Zi dhe Sllovenia i ndanë përvojat e tyre në anketën më të madh ndonjëherë të pakicave seksuale dhe gjinore në rajon. Raporti i hulumtimit “Jeta në margjina: Rezultatet e anketës lidhur me përvojat e personave LGBTI në Evropën Juglindore” ofron një përshkrim të hollësishëm të përgjigjeve dhe tregon një histori të diskriminimit, të përjashtimit dhe të dhunës.

România: politicile publice eficiente și instituțiile pot să limiteze impactul dezastrelor naturale

Donato De Rosa's picture
Also available in: English


Banca Mondială a finalizat de curând Diagnosticul sistematic de țară care evidențiază vulnerabilitatea României față de dezastrele naturale. De-a lungul anilor, inundațiile, seceta și cutremurele au rezultat în mii de victime și miliarde de euro daune aduse infrastructurii fizice. Acestea au afectat capacitatea de producție a economie și i-au afectat în mod disproporționat pe cei săraci.

O țară vulnerabilă

În țările din întreaga lume apar deja dovezile impactului negativ al schimbărilor climatice care au făcut ca modelele de creștere din trecut să nu mai fie durabile și care au dus la regresul reducerii sărăciei și al prosperității comune.

România nu face excepție. Riscurile legate de climă și dezastrele naturale, incluzând creșterea incidenței inundațiilor grave pe continente și a secetelor tot mai intense și mai frecvente, devin „noua normalitate”, ceea ce are întotdeauna un preț ridicat.

Romania: good policies and institutions can limit the impact of natural disasters

Donato De Rosa's picture
Also available in: Română


The World Bank’s recently completed Systematic Country Diagnostic highlights Romania’s vulnerability to natural disasters. Over the years, floods, droughts and earthquakes have cost the country thousands of casualties and billions of euros in damages to physical infrastructure. They have hurt the economy’s productive capacity and disproportionately affected the poor.

A vulnerable country

Countries around the world are already seeing evidence of the damaging impact of climate change, which is making past growth patterns unsustainable and reversing progress made on poverty reduction and shared prosperity.

“Step by Step”: Enhancing the tourism potential of southern Albania

Anita Ellmauer-Klambauer's picture
Also available in: Shqip
Saranda stairs. Source: Piotrus  

One of my favorite memories from the past summer was discovering Saranda, located in the southern part of the ‘Albanian Riviera.’ I was fascinated by the city’s beautiful location - right on the Ionian Sea coast, with its deep blue waters and with the island of Corfu (Greece) visible on the horizon. I was far from being the only visitor as Saranda is full of people during the summer. In fact, while the usual population is around 35,000, in July and August, this figure can swell with an influx of tourists. During 2016, Saranda registered over 700,000 visitors.
 
Saranda is not alone in this regard. Over the past years in Albania, tourism has significantly increased, especially in places like Ksamil, Saranda, and Durres. From August 2017 to August 2018, according to the national statistical office, Albania hosted 2.1 million visitors - a 16.8% increase compared to the previous year. And most of these tourists came for the sun and beaches in the summer. These figures are expected to continue to grow in the coming years. On World Tourism Day, the Ministry of Tourism and Environment even indicated that Albania aims to attract 10 million tourists by 2025!
 

Life on the Margins: experiences of LGBTI people in southeastern Europe

Linda Van Gelder's picture
Also available in: Bosanski | Shqip | Русский


At the World Bank, we know that social inclusion is not only the right thing but also the economically smart thing to do. More inclusive societies are more likely to make the most of their entire stock of human capital. More open and inclusive cities are better placed to attract international capital and talent. More open and inclusive countries make more attractive international tourist destinations.

2,300 LGBTI people from Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Kosovo, FYR Macedonia, Montenegro, and Slovenia shared their experiences in the largest-ever survey of sexual and gender minorities in the region. The research report “Life on the Margins: Survey Results of the Experiences of LGBTI People in Southeastern Europe” provides a detailed account of the responses and tells a story of discrimination, exclusion, and violence.

Working Across Borders to Improve Early Warnings in South Eastern Europe

Daniel Werner Kull's picture

A massive storm system brought historic flooding across South Eastern Europe in 2014, causing more than $2 billion in damages in Bosnia and Herzegovina and shrinking Serbia’s economy by nearly a full percent. Two years later, in August 2016, thunderstorms in the Former Yugoslav Republic (FYR) of Macedonia dropped 93 liters of precipitation per square meter in just a few hours, sparking flash floods in the capital, Skopje, that killed at least 21 people.
 
In both cases, some of these impacts could have been reduced by improving cross-border monitoring and forecasting while strengthening early warning services at a national level. Fortunately, governments are now working together to improve information exchanges across boundaries and strengthening regional early warning systems through the South-East European Multi-Hazard Early Warning Advisory System.

On shaky ground: Housing in Europe and Central Asia

Ashna Mathema's picture
Also available in: Русский
Housing in ECA


















The social, political, and economic transition of countries across Eastern Europe, the Caucasus, and Central Asia over the last three decades has been a long and arduous process, and many challenges remain. Among them, an imminent concern is the seismic threat faced by certain housing typologies that are believed to have outlived their design lifespan, and suffer from serious deterioration and disinvestment.

Has Belarus really succeeded in pursuing gender equality?

Alex Kremer's picture
Also available in: Русский
I sometimes wonder — do women in Belarus live a good life? Well, they are better educated than men, live about a decade longer than men, and enjoy generous social guarantees (3 years of child care leave, for example). And they have a high-level of labor force participation and representation in politics.

Even by international standards, Belarusian women seem to live well. In the latest Global Gender Gap Index, Belarus was ranked 26th out of 144 countries — higher than Australia or the Netherlands. The statistics certainly indicate a high-level of gender equality in Belarus.

But what do the numbers really mean in reality?

As Kazakhstan’s economy develops, ensuring no family is left behind

Ato Brown's picture
Also available in: Русский
During a recent trip to a popular tourist enclave in Kazakhstan called Borovoye, I decided to make a stopover in the village of Makinsk, about 150 km north of the capital city Astana. I was keen to learn more about the communities and people living outside the capital and other major cities. Living in a modern, dynamic city like Astana, one does not get a true sense of people’s lives in rural Kazakhstan.
 
In Makinsk, I met with Kabenke Dosenkhan and Onerkhan Nurbek, the proud parents of eight children; their youngest was born in February this year. They told me about the village and their daily lives, and they introduced their wonderful children. I also heard about how they had struggled in the recent past to make ends meet, surviving on the equivalent of US$50 per month in child benefits, supplemented occasionally with pay for manual labor by the head of the household, Onerkhan.

Romanian migrants can make a difference back home

Donato De Rosa's picture
Also available in: Română | Русский


Beautiful, newly-erected houses in an otherwise deserted place. There couldn’t be a better image for the effects of Romanian emigration, which the World Bank has analyzed in a recently published report.

If you are wondering who owns the ghost houses, you only have to look at the sheer number of Romanians living and working abroad - between 3 and 5 million according to some estimates or 3.6 million, according to the UN (2017). Of these, 2.7 million are of working age, equivalent to a staggering 20.6 percent of Romania’s working age population!

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