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Health

The high toll of traffic injuries in Central Asia: unacceptable and preventable

Aliya Karakulova's picture
Also available in: Русский

Did you know that in Kazakhstan we live in the country with the deadliest roads? Every year, 3,000 people die on roads in Kazakhstan, and over 30,000 are injured. Imagine if an airplane crashed every month! Would you fly?

We are 11 times more likely to die in a traffic accident in Kazakhstan than in Norway. Indeed, the numbers for road deaths are high in all Central Asian countries.

The High Toll of Traffic Injuries in Central Asia
Source: WHO, 2013


Globally, road traffic injuries are the leading cause of death among people aged between 15 and 29 years. Not cancer, not heart diseases, and not wars.

Life changing injuries and deaths affect countries in terms of health care and economic costs – the annual economic loss of road deaths in Central Asian countries is estimated at around 3-4% of GDP.

But beyond this monetary value, lies a person’s life. 

Confessions of an Armenian (aspirational former) smoker

Vigen Sargsyan's picture
no smoking Armenia
First confession: I am a seasoned smoker.

Next confession: I have long dreamed of adding “former” to that status. From time to time, my inner struggle reaches a crescendo, but then the momentum vanishes until the next wave of self-examination.
 
Smoking is the worst, if not the most stupid habit I have. I definitely understand that the damage caused to my health from smoking cannot be undone. I suspect my habit is a bit generational: my father was a smoker – until the doctors came up with a verdict – and the smell of smoke has been at home since my childhood. My son picked it up too, unfortunately. The only change between the generations is that my dad smoked at the table; these days we lean on the balcony.

Do the right thing: Tax tobacco!

Alex Kremer's picture
Also available in: Română | Русский
Both my grandfathers smoked when they were young. My father’s father was a shopkeeper who smoked a pipe and my mother’s father was a smallholder who smoked cigarettes. Both died of heart failure and left my grandmothers as widows. My father grew up as a little boy in an atmosphere of pipe smoke and sometimes I wonder whether this contributed to his asthma and his own heart problems. My mother became a doctor, a cancer specialist, and she always used to tell my brother and me that we should never smoke, because she saw every day what smoking had done to her patients.

Să facem ce e corect – să taxăm tutunul

Alex Kremer's picture
Also available in: English | Русский
Ambii mei bunici fumau în tinerețe. Bunelul din partea tatălui fuma pipa, iar cel din partea mamei era fermier și fuma țigări. Ambii au lăsat bunicile văduve fiind răpiți de atac de cord. Tatăl meu a crescut într-o atmosferă unde permanent inhala fumul de pipă, și uneori mă întreb dacă aceasta a contribuit la problemele lui astmatice și de inima. Mama a devenit medic, specialist în domeniul cancerului și permanent ne spunea, mie și fratelui, să nu fumăm niciodată, deoarece ea zilnic vedea cum suferă pacienții săi din cauza fumatului.

Proud to celebrate 25 years of partnership for a more prosperous and equal Romania

Elisabetta Capannelli's picture
Also available in: Română | Русский


In 1991, the World Bank Group opened its resident office in Bucharest and this November we will celebrate 25 years of continued presence in Romania. Romania joined the World Bank in 1972, yet it is really 1991 that marks the opening of the institution’s presence in Romania and our new role in a free and democratic nation. 

A quarter century is the measure of a generation and it is as an important milestone for an institution, as it is for a human being. Our presence in Romania has matured together with the country’s first generation of people born in a free economy and society. The challenges they faced, where the face of our support for change. 

Onoraţi să sărbătorim 25 de ani de parteneriat pentru o Românie mai prosperă și mai echitabilă

Elisabetta Capannelli's picture
Also available in: English | Русский


Grupul Banca Mondială a deschis biroul din București în anul 1991, iar în luna noiembrie a acestui an vom aniversa 25 de ani de activitate continuă în România. România a început colaborarea cu Banca Mondială în anul 1972, însă anul 1991 marchează deschiderea oficială a biroului din România și noul nostru rol în susținerea unei națiuni libere și democrate. 

Un sfert de secol reprezintă măsura unei generații și este un eveniment important atât pentru o instituție, cât și pentru o ființă umană. Prezența noastră în România s-a maturizat împreună cu prima generație de persoane născute într-o societate și o economie liberă. Provocările cu care s-a confruntat această generaţie, au fost reflecția susținerii noastre pentru schimbare.  

How - and on what money - could we live to the age of 150 years?

Johannes Koettl's picture
Also available in: Русский
Retired man with his surfboard
Nature has given every species an intrinsic life span. Life span is a bit like an upper bound to life expectancy: if you got every member of a species healthier and healthier, life expectancy of that species would constantly increase, but eventually be bound by life span.

Every species has a different life span: for flies, it’s just a couple of days, for bowhead whales it’s 200 years. For humans, biologists have found that up until the 1960s, life span was around 89 years. This means that if we kept improving our health systems, the world population’s life expectancy would converge to our species’ life span of 89.

So how did we break the limits of life expectancy?

Are we Armenians insecure about food safety?

Vigen Sargsyan's picture
Also available in: Русский
I was quite surprised recently to find out that a poll of 1,066 people across Yerevan and all ten regions of Armenia revealed substantial gaps in public awareness of food safety and people's behavior. The Social Survey on Food Safety Public Awareness (June 2015) may have produced some provoking outcomes, but it could certainly become a roadmap for the State Service for Food Safety (SSFS) in its efforts to further enhance food safety in Armenia.

Transforming Primary Health Care in Tajikistan through Performance-Based Financing

Sarvinoz Barfieva's picture
Also available in: Русский

In Tajikistan, primary health care (PHC) accounts for just 27 percent of public health spending and yet PHC accounts for over 70 percent of all referrals and health visits across the country.

Given this imbalance, in April 2014 the country launched the pre-pilot of a new PHC financing mechanism, using a Performance-Based Financing (PBF) approach, which should significantly improve the quality and coverage of PHC services. The pre-pilot phase focuses primarily on the prevention and early detection of maternal and child health (MCH) related diseases and non-communicable diseases.

Tajik women and a child