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Private Sector Development

Doing Business and Central Asia – After 15 years, how much reform?

Stefka Slavova's picture
Also available in: Русский


This year, the annual Doing Business Report – by far the most anticipated and cited World Bank publication – celebrates its 15th year. Starting in 2003, the fledgling report, which covers about 130 countries, has grown into its teens garnering admiration and criticism in equal measure. Some absolutely love it, while others argue that its flaws outweigh its strong points.

Regardless, nobody can deny that the Doing Business report has been a major catalyst for reforms across the world – 3,200 reforms of business regulation have been counted to date, spurred by the Report and carried out in line with the methodology of its indicators.

Што се случува ако не ја платите својата сметка? Извлечени поуки од централна и источна Европа

Georgia Harley's picture
Also available in: English


Сите ние имаме редовни сметки за плаќање за сеприсутните услуги кои ги трошиме – било да се работи за комунални услуги (вода, затоплување, електрична енергија итн.), кредитни картички, членства или отплати за автомобили.  Но, не сите ги плаќаат своите сметки.

Во целата економија овие неплатени сметки се претвораат во милиони предмети за извршување од мала вредност, кои честопати се неспорни. На економијата ѝ е потребен систем кој брзо, евтино и првично може да се справи со ваквиот долг.  Доколку системот за наплата на долгови потфрли тоа доведува до низа системски проблеми кои постепено ги задушуваат како судовите така и целата економија. 

Во неколку земји каде што работиме во Европа – главно во средна, јужна и источна Европа – судовите се заглавени со огромен број на заостанати предмети од ваков вид. Сепак, некои од нивните соседи успеале да го решат проблемот. 

Зошто луѓето не плаќаат? Зошто некои земји се подобри во оваа работа од другите?  И што може да се направи за да се подобрат системите за наплата на долговите?

What happens if you don’t pay your bill? Lessons from Central and Eastern Europe

Georgia Harley's picture
Also available in: Македонски


We all have regular bills to pay for the ubiquitous services we consume – whether they be for utilities (water, heating, electricity etc.), credit cards, memberships, or car payments.  But, not everyone pays.  

So why don’t people pay?  Why are some countries better at this than others?  And what can be done to improve systems for debt collection?

Moldova – Ce urmează?

Alex Kremer's picture
Also available in: English | Русский
Road menders in MoldovaDupă o pauză de doi ani, Banca Mondială a oferit Republicii Moldova suportul bugetar atât de necesar în noiembrie 2016. Această plată de 45 milioane de dolari SUA a reflectat încrederea noastră, că Guvernul și Banca Națională gestionau, într-un final, circumstanțele care au determinat, prin intermediul unei fraude scandaloase, pierderea a unei optimi din venitul anual al Republicii Moldova.

Totuși, asistența oferită Republicii Moldova pentru stabilizarea crizei economice reprezintă doar debutul creșterii economiei și al îmbunătățirii vieții oamenilor. Deci, unde ar trebui să fie concentrate acum eforturile?

Moldova – What’s next?

Alex Kremer's picture
Also available in: Русский | Română
Road menders in MoldovaAfter a two-year hiatus, the World Bank provided much-needed budget support to Moldova in November 2016. That disbursement of $45 million reflected our confidence that the Government and the National Bank were at last dealing with the conditions that had previously lost – in a scandalous fraud – one eight of Moldova’s yearly income.

Helping Moldova to stabilize an economic crisis, however, is only the beginning of growing the economy and improving people’s lives. So, where should we focus our efforts now?

From forgotten Yugos to new engines of growth: Reviving the car industry in South East Europe

John Mackedon's picture
The former Yugoslavia was mainly known for its not-so-successful and cheap cars, primarily the Yugo. In its review of the 50 worst cars of all time, Time magazine referred to the Yugo GV as the “Mona Lisa of bad cars.”

Nevertheless, the car industry played an important role in the economic development of the socialist Yugoslavia, representing a big employer across all former Yugoslav republics. The onset of war in the early 1990s dealt a significant blow to the car industry there, with most the production facilities closing down by the end of that decade.

And then, in the early 2000s, car companies began opening new facilities in the immediate neighborhood (Hungary, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia) and the region began producing world renowned brands such as Audi, Mercedes Benz, Renault, and Suzuki. This represented a new opportunity for manufacturers from the region to enter new supply chains - relying on skilled and experienced labor. On top of this, FIAT also opened a new factory in Serbia, further spurring demand for locally produced automotive parts.
 

ციფრული რევოლუციის, უნარებისა და კომუნიკაციების მომავლის შესახებ

Tako Kobakhidze's picture
Also available in: English

 

WDR2016
ინფორმაციისა და კომუნიკაციების სფეროში კაცობრიობის ისტორიაში ჯერ არნახული უდიდესი რევოლუცია ხდება. მართალია, ამ ფრაზის ავტორი მე არ ვარ, მაგრამ სრულიად ვეთანხმები მას. სწორედ ამ წინადადებამ მიბიძგა წამეკითხა დოკუმენტის „მსოფლიოს განვითარების ანგარიში -2016: ციფრული დივიდენდები“ სრული მიმოხილვა.
 
ყოველთვის მაინტერესებდა, რას ნიშნავს სინამდვილეში ციფრული რევოლუცია. ვის, თუ არა ნახსენები ანგარიშის თანაავტორს შეეძლო ამ კითხვაზე პასუხის გაცემა! დიახ, გასულ კვირას შესაძლებლობა მომეცა, ინტერვიუ ჩამეწერა თბილისში მყოფ უვე დაიხმანთან. ის საქართველოს  8 აპრილს ეწვია „როუდშოუს“ ფარგლებში მსოფლიო ბანკის ჯგუფის მიერ განხორციელებული სამუშაოს წარსადგენად მთავრობის, ბიზნესის, აკადემიური წრეების, სტუდენტების და სხვა დაინტერესებული აუდიტორიის წინაშე ბიზნეს ფორუმზე: ინოვაცია და ციფრული ეკონომიკა.

On digital revolution, skills and the future of communications

Tako Kobakhidze's picture
Also available in: Georgian

WDR2016

We find ourselves in the midst of the greatest information and communications revolution in human history. I’m not the author of this phrase, but I fully agree with it. This particular sentence made me read the entire overview of the World Development Report 2016: Digital Dividends.

I have always been wondering what does the Digital Revolution actually mean. Who, but the Co-Director of the report could have answered my question best?! Yes, I had the opportunity to interview Uwe Deichmann last week in Tbilisi. He visited Georgia as part of the ‘road-show’ to present this work of the World Bank Group team to the government, business, academia, students, and other interested audience attending the Business Forum: Innovation and Digital Economy.

How can Russia grow out of recession?

Birgit Hansl's picture
Also available in: Русский

Russia’s economic woes continue: the recession deepened in the first half of 2015, severely impacting households, while the economy continued to adjust to the 2014 terms-of-trade shock, which saw oil prices being halved within a few months. In addition, investment demand has contracted for a third consecutive year.

Economic policy uncertainty, arising from an unpredictable geopolitical situation and the ongoing sanctions, caused private investment to decline rapidly as capital costs rose and consumer demand evaporated.

The record drop in consumer demand was driven by a sharp contraction in real wages, which fell by an average of 8.5% in the first six months of 2015 - illustrating the severity of the recession. The erosion of real incomes significantly increased the poverty rate and exacerbated the vulnerability of households in the lower 40% of the income distribution.

So, if oil prices remain low, how can Russia grow out of its recession?

Shedding Some Light on Worker Skills in Uzbekistan

Mohamed Ihsan Ajwad's picture
When we first set out to answer some basic questions facing policymakers in Uzbekistan, we were unsure what exactly to expect. Little was known about worker skills in Uzbekistan until last year, when two surveys were carried out by international partners. One survey (a joint effort between GIZ and the World Bank) assessed cognitive, non-cognitive, and technical skills of the working age population by interviewing 1,500 households. A second survey (commissioned by the World Bank) interviewed 232 enterprises employing higher education graduates and used a mix of qualitative and quantitative methods to assess employer satisfaction with workers’ skills.

When we analyzed the data for our recent report, “The Skills Road: Skills for Employability in Uzbekistan” what we found was eye-opening.