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Social Development

I believe Belarus will benefit greatly from the Human Capital Index – Here’s why

Alex Kremer's picture
Also available in: Русский


On 11 October 2018, the World Bank launched its Human Capital Index, which quantifies the contribution of health and education to the productivity of the next generation of workers. The Index is part of the Human Capital Project, a global effort to accelerate more and better investments in people. Belarus didn’t participate in the Index this year.

Back in 1440, King Henry VI of England founded a college for poor scholars, providing a free education for boys whose families couldn’t afford to pay. At that time, the young students learned to read and write so that they could later work as administrators in the royal court.

A few centuries later, in 1977, I became one of “King Henry’s scholars”. I’m not working for a king, of course, but I recognize how lucky I am to have benefited from Henry’s medieval investment in human capital. One could perhaps call him a “very early adopter”.

These days, investing in people makes more economic sense than ever. Human capital – the knowledge, skills, and health that people accumulate throughout their lives – accounts for up to 68% of a country’s overall wealth, on average. In the case of Belarus, where I now live, the share of human capital in the country’s total wealth is somewhat lower, at 49.2%.

Jeta në margjina: përvoja e personave LGBTI në Evropën Juglindore

Linda Van Gelder's picture
Also available in: English | Bosanski | Русский


Në Bankën Botërore, e dimë se përfshirja sociale nuk është vetëm gjëja e duhur, por edhe ekonomikisht gjëja më e mençur për ta bërë. Shoqëritë më përfshirëse kanë më shumë gjasa që ta shfrytëzojnë më së miri kapitalin njerëzor. Qytetet më të hapura dhe më përfshirëse kanë më shumë gjasa për ta tërhequr kapitalin dhe talentin ndërkombëtar. Shtetet më të hapura dhe më përfshirëse janë destinacione më tërheqëse për turistët ndërkombëtarë.

2,300 persona LGBTI nga Shqipëria, Bosnja dhe Hercegovina, Kroacia, Kosova, Ish Republika Jugosllave e Maqedonisë, Mali i Zi dhe Sllovenia i ndanë përvojat e tyre në anketën më të madh ndonjëherë të pakicave seksuale dhe gjinore në rajon. Raporti i hulumtimit “Jeta në margjina: Rezultatet e anketës lidhur me përvojat e personave LGBTI në Evropën Juglindore” ofron një përshkrim të hollësishëm të përgjigjeve dhe tregon një histori të diskriminimit, të përjashtimit dhe të dhunës.

Život na margini: Iskustva LGBTI osoba u jugoistočnoj Evropi

Linda Van Gelder's picture
Also available in: English | Shqip | Русский


Mi u Svjetskoj banci smo svjesni da je socijalna inkluzija, ne samo ispravan, već i ekonomski mudar, pristup. Što je društvo inkluzivnije, veća je vjerovatnoća da će bolje iskoristiti svoj cjelokupni ljudski kapital. Otvoreniji i inkluzivniji gradovi imaju veće šanse za privlačenje međunarodnog kapitala i talenata. Otvorenije i inkluzivnije države predstavljaju privlačnije međunarodne turističke destinacije.

2.300 LGBTI osoba iz Albanije, Bosne i Hercegovine, Hrvatske, s Kosova, BJR Makedonije, Crne Gore i Slovenije je iznijelo svoja iskustva u, do sada najvećem, istraživanju  seksualnih i rodnih manjina u regiji. Izvještaj ovog istraživanja pod nazivom “Život na margini: Rezultati istraživanja iskustava LGBTI osoba u jugoistočnoj Evropi” daje detaljan prikaz odgovora i ukazuje na diskriminaciju, isključivanje i nasilje.

Life on the Margins: experiences of LGBTI people in southeastern Europe

Linda Van Gelder's picture
Also available in: Bosanski | Shqip | Русский


At the World Bank, we know that social inclusion is not only the right thing but also the economically smart thing to do. More inclusive societies are more likely to make the most of their entire stock of human capital. More open and inclusive cities are better placed to attract international capital and talent. More open and inclusive countries make more attractive international tourist destinations.

2,300 LGBTI people from Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Kosovo, FYR Macedonia, Montenegro, and Slovenia shared their experiences in the largest-ever survey of sexual and gender minorities in the region. The research report “Life on the Margins: Survey Results of the Experiences of LGBTI People in Southeastern Europe” provides a detailed account of the responses and tells a story of discrimination, exclusion, and violence.

Growth in Central Asia hinges on creating more jobs with higher wages

Lilia Burunciuc's picture
Also available in: Русский


Jobs and wage growth have been the most important driver of poverty reduction globally, and Central Asia. In Tajikistan, for example, it has cut poverty by about two-thirds since 2003. In Kazakhstan, it accounted for more than three-quarters of income growth over the past decade — even among the poorest 20 percent. The other Central Asian nations have also achieved significant economic growth and poverty reduction in the past two decades due to income growth.

But poverty-reduction rates have slowed. In Kyrgyzstan, they began slowing during the global recession of 2008, as income growth faltered. Poverty reduction in Tajikistan leveled off in 2015, when wage growth slackened and remittances from Tajiks working overseas fell.

In Uzbekistan, more than 90 percent of the poorest households have identified lack of jobs as their most urgent priority. For these families, the prospect of increasing their income is slim, while the likelihood of transmitting poverty to their children is high.

So what should countries in Central Asian do to build on their past achievements and prepare their citizens for the jobs of the future?

As Kazakhstan’s economy develops, ensuring no family is left behind

Ato Brown's picture
Also available in: Русский
During a recent trip to a popular tourist enclave in Kazakhstan called Borovoye, I decided to make a stopover in the village of Makinsk, about 150 km north of the capital city Astana. I was keen to learn more about the communities and people living outside the capital and other major cities. Living in a modern, dynamic city like Astana, one does not get a true sense of people’s lives in rural Kazakhstan.
 
In Makinsk, I met with Kabenke Dosenkhan and Onerkhan Nurbek, the proud parents of eight children; their youngest was born in February this year. They told me about the village and their daily lives, and they introduced their wonderful children. I also heard about how they had struggled in the recent past to make ends meet, surviving on the equivalent of US$50 per month in child benefits, supplemented occasionally with pay for manual labor by the head of the household, Onerkhan.

Roma inclusion: leveraging opportunities for social change

Ede Ijjasz-Vasquez's picture
April 8 was International Romani Day. As we celebrate the Roma people and their culture, we must remember the serious issues they face every day: stigmatization, discrimination, exclusion, and poverty. Join Senior Director for the Social, Urban, Rural and Resilience Global Practice Ede Ijjasz-Vasquez and Senior Social Scientist Nina Bhatt as they discuss these issues.
 


 

Adolescenții, rolurile de gen și relațiile de cuplu în Moldova

Daniela Misail-Nichitin's picture
Also available in: English
The Harmonious Family Relationships course is Moldova’s first, voluntary school-based intervention focused on the prevention of domestic violence

Un studiu recent pe un eșantion de 220 de elevi din clasele X-XII din Republica Moldova a relatat că opt din zece (atât de gen masculin, cât și feminin) erau de părerea că o femeie trebuie să știe cum să gătească și să-i placă menajul. Fiind întrebați ce și-ar dori cel mai mult de la un partener intim, au vorbit despre aspectele fizice, înfățișare. De asemenea, adolescenții au relatat că, în opinia lor, o fată care locuiește cu un partener de sex masculin înainte de căsătorie este ușuratică.

Adolescents, gender roles and intimate partner relationships in Moldova

Daniela Misail-Nichitin's picture
Also available in: Română
The Harmonious Family Relationships course is Moldova’s first, voluntary school-based intervention focused on the prevention of domestic violence

A recent study of 220 10th -12th grade students from the Republic of Moldova revealed that eight in 10 (both male and female) believed that a woman needed to know how to cook and enjoy cooking. When asked what they wanted most from an intimate partner, they spoke of physical aspects, how they looked. The teens also revealed that they believe that a girl who lives with a male partner before marriage is of easy virtue.

What do we know about the development outcomes of LGBTI people?

Dominik Koehler's picture
We all know, sadly, that lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and intersex (LGBTI) people suffer discrimination and stigma. This happens around the world, particularly in developing countries.  But how does this discrimination affect their lives, their development outcomes? 

Let’s find out.
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