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Why Skills Matter in the Kyrgyz Republic

Mohamed Ihsan Ajwad's picture
During my visits to the Kyrgyz Republic I am always surprised to talk with people who fondly reminisce about the economy during Soviet times.  Taxi drivers nostalgically describe traffic coming to a stop as factories changed shifts.  I guess I should be less surprised, given that, prior to 1991, the Kyrgyz Republic produced almost exclusively for the Soviet Union.

With the fall of the Soviet Union, much of Russia’s demand disappeared and many firms in the country closed during the 1990s. Although the industrial sector has begun a revival over the last few years - with garment shops and private enterprises expanding - the service sector now dominates in the country - accounting for approximately 54% of GDP and 64% of jobs.

Following two rounds of low PISA test results, the government became concerned about skills more broadly and how those skills might affect employment outcomes.

But, little was known about skills in the country!

On the Road from Yerevan to Tbilisi

David M. Gould's picture
 
On the road from Yerevan to Tbilisi
On the road from Yerevan to Tbilisi
I recently spent three days in Yerevan on a mission to learn a bit more about Armenia’s overall development challenges for a World Bank study on “Connectivity”, before heading off to Tbilisi, Georgia and Baku, Azerbaijan to do the same.

It was my first time visiting Armenia, so it was a fascinating trip and I learned a tremendous amount about the country and its people.

Of course, in three days one can only get a small sample of the major issues that challenge development, rather than a rich flavor for the deep subtleties that represent the people or factors that drive the economy. But, given my basic knowledge of the country, the new information I gained was a tremendous leap forward.

My Share of the Pie … or How to Maintain a Decent Standard of Living in Poland’s Aging Society

Paulina Ewa Holda's picture
Elderly couple in Poland
Photo: Jutta Benzenberg/World Bank
I came to a stark realization recently while working on a report called Poland: Saving for Growth and Prosperous Aging. 20 or 30 years from now, the life I will lead will be vastly different to the lives my parents lead. And, I will have aged alongside many more people: between now and 2050, the percentage of Poland’s population aged 65 and older will almost triple from 21% to 58%.

Moving 4 Degrees South

Victor Neagu's picture
We talk so frequently about how we shape our work and yet rarely about how our work shapes us. Let me explain. I recently moved 4 degrees in latitude – from Chisinau, Moldova to Almaty, Kazakhstan, on a six-month development assignment – and it has been fascinating to discover in just one week how similar our collective mentalities are!

100 Days Old in Moldova

Alex Kremer's picture

100 days ago today, I relocated to Moldova from Kyrgyzstan. I’m still getting to know my new host country and still figuring my way around the office (so please don’t ask me just yet where to find the office paper-puncher).
Also, if you ask me “How’s Moldova?” you will probably get the standard response, “Ask me again in six months”.
However, I can give any newcomer to Moldova one solid piece of advice: do not do what I did! Do not, on any account, read “The Good Life Elsewhere” by Vladimir Lorchenkov.

Technology and Jobs - Is Poland Ready?

Roberta V. Gatti's picture

The IT revolution has transformed labor markets globally in an unprecedented way. New jobs as well as new ways of working have appeared, and traditional skills and jobs have lost their dominance. World Bank Lead Economist Roberta Gatti looks at Poland's ability to address the challenges posed by these new realities.

Shedding Some Light on Worker Skills in Uzbekistan

Mohamed Ihsan Ajwad's picture
When we first set out to answer some basic questions facing policymakers in Uzbekistan, we were unsure what exactly to expect. Little was known about worker skills in Uzbekistan until last year, when two surveys were carried out by international partners. One survey (a joint effort between GIZ and the World Bank) assessed cognitive, non-cognitive, and technical skills of the working age population by interviewing 1,500 households. A second survey (commissioned by the World Bank) interviewed 232 enterprises employing higher education graduates and used a mix of qualitative and quantitative methods to assess employer satisfaction with workers’ skills.

When we analyzed the data for our recent report, “The Skills Road: Skills for Employability in Uzbekistan” what we found was eye-opening.

In Photos: Building Climate Resilience in Bosnia and Herzegovina

Artem Kolesnikov's picture

Bosnia and Herzegovina is vulnerable to natural shocks that could derail the country’s development agenda. The devastating floods of 2014 highlighted the need for increased investment in infrastructure and policies that will help the country mitigate expected impacts from a shifting climate and shield the most vulnerable from natural disasters.

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