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Don’t sweat the small stuff – lessons from European courts

Georgia Harley's picture

Last year, we posted a blog – Resolving Minor Disputes Matters Big Time for the Poor – which highlighted how courts can fast-track minor disputes to deliver faster, cheaper and more appropriate justice and how – for the poor and for micro and small businesses – this may be their only path to justice. 

Increasingly, citizens and businesses demand fast-tracking services for small cases and, according to Doing Business data, 138 economies have a small claims procedure of some kind. So courts across the world are eager to learn how to roll out such reforms – either to introduce a fast track procedure or to improve on an existing one.

Modernizing property registration: Four lessons we can learn from Russia

Wael Zakout's picture
Also available in: Русский
 Wael Zakout

I just came back from a trip to Russia. Back in 2006 and 2007, I had traveled to Russia frequently as the lead for the Cadastre Development Project. This time - as a Global Lead for Land and Geospatial at the World Bank - I saw something I did not expect to see.

Privatization of real-estate properties and protecting property rights became two important pillars of transformation following the end of the Soviet era. But, while they were important policy goals in the 1990s, the system did not really function properly: rights were not fully protected and people waited for many months to register property transactions.

Who's heard of "Garbology"?

Meriem Gray's picture
Also available in: Русский

It's as tall as some of Baku’s fanciest buildings, but the only residents here are crows and seagulls. Welcome to the Central Balakhani Sanitary Landfill, the largest rubbish dump in the Greater Baku area. But this is a dump with a difference: it is meticulously organized, as far as garbage disposal sites go.

Recently, the site was nothing but a big, open pile of burning garbage that has been rising from the ground since it was a designated dumping site in 1963. Now, six days a week, an army of trucks delivers 350 tons of municipal solid waste from the homes and offices of Baku’s millions of inhabitants.

Inspecting Poland's inspections

Maciej Drozd's picture


According to the World Bank’s Doing Business report, Poland ranked 74th globally in the ease of doing business in 2006. It took 10 procedures to incorporate a business in Warsaw, more than 40 steps to pay taxes, close to 200 days to register property, and almost 1,000 days to enforce a contract. A decade later, Poland ranked 24th, higher than the EU average – progress unmatched by any high-income country in terms of ease of doing business.

Poland has been one of the most active and steady reformers of its business environment in the world, but firms are yet to benefit from reforming the country’s burdensome business inspections.

Assessing disaster risk in Europe and Central Asia – what did we learn?

Alanna Simpson's picture
Heavy rains on June 13-14, 2015 caused a 1 million cubic-meter landslide to flow down the Vere River valley and damage the capital city of Tbilisi, Georgia. (Photo via Wikimedia Commons)
Across the Europe and Central Asia region today, policymakers are confronted daily with a wide range of development challenges and decisions, but the potential impacts of adverse natural events and climate change – such as earthquakes or flooding – may not always be first and foremost in their thoughts.

Admittedly, the region does not face the same daunting disaster risks as some other parts of the world – especially in South Asia, East Asia and Latin America – but nevertheless, it is far from immune to the effects of natural hazards – as the past clearly reminds us.

Let’s turn the lights on! The PISA test and FYR Macedonia

Bojana Naceva's picture
 

In 2015, over half a million students—representing 28 million 15-year-olds in 72 countries and economies—took the OECD’s Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) test. The Former Yugoslav Republic (FYR) of Macedonia has participated in international large scale assessments since 1999.

Debates about the country’s performance have always focused on a comparison with other counties’ mean scores; and, after a few days, everyone - including the education authorities – have continued with business as usual.  The available data was rarely used to underpin policy decisions or shape reforms.

The system has operated in the dark for decades.Addressing these challenges requires the mobilization of all available expertise in the country, regardless of political or ethnic affiliation. The time is now, tomorrow may be too late.

Taking stock of progress and prospects in Moldova

Maria Davalos's picture
Also available in: Română | Русский
As the end of a year approaches, we instinctively take stock of what we accomplished and what will make it to our list of resolutions for next year. But, once in a while, it’s good to take a broader view than just year-to-year.

And a recent report does just that! Poverty Reduction and Shared Prosperity in Moldova: Progress and Prospects looks at what Moldova has achieved over the past decade in terms of poverty reduction and inclusive growth, and what the challenges are for the coming years.


 

Bilanțul progreselor și perspectivelor pentru Moldova

Maria Davalos's picture
Also available in: English | Русский

Odată cu apropierea sfârșitului de an, ținem instinctiv să facem bilanțul a tot ce am realizat și tot ce va fi inclus pe lista noastră de rezoluții pentru anul viitor. Însă, uneori, este bine de făcut un bilanț mai amplu, decât doar de la an la an.

Un raport recent face exact acest lucru! Reducerea sărăciei și prosperitatea împărtășită în Moldova: Progrese și perspective examinează ce a obținut Moldova în ultimul deceniu în materie de reducere a sărăciei și creștere incluzivă și care sunt provocările pentru anii următori.

Do the right thing: Tax tobacco!

Alex Kremer's picture
Also available in: Română | Русский
Both my grandfathers smoked when they were young. My father’s father was a shopkeeper who smoked a pipe and my mother’s father was a smallholder who smoked cigarettes. Both died of heart failure and left my grandmothers as widows. My father grew up as a little boy in an atmosphere of pipe smoke and sometimes I wonder whether this contributed to his asthma and his own heart problems. My mother became a doctor, a cancer specialist, and she always used to tell my brother and me that we should never smoke, because she saw every day what smoking had done to her patients.

It’s not just women that need to support gender equality in the workplace

Ismail Radwan's picture
Also available in: Română | Русский
I was recently awarded the honorary title of “Manbassador” by the Professional Women’s Network (PWN).  PWN is the leading Romanian organization promoting gender equality in the workplace.

In Romania, as in many high-income countries, women have for many years eclipsed men both in terms of numbers of graduates and educational attainment, and yet these advances in education are not matched in the workplace. I hope that all who read this blog will take a moment to think about how they can play a role in supporting women’s empowerment and ending discrimination in the workplace.

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