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What does it take to modernize government administration? Lessons from Romania

Irina Schuman's picture
Also available in: Română | Русский


Romania has transformed tremendously in the past decades.  Like its neighbors, the former transition economy has decisively committed to European Union (EU) integration. This has opened up great opportunities for both its citizens and its economy.  

This transformation has had a positive impact on agriculture and rural areas. The European Common Agricultural Policy provided a sound policy framework, emphasizing investment in agriculture and rewarding environmentally friendly farming. It also drove institutional change by introducing modern IT systems and practices for the management of EU funds, as well as by committing €24 billion for the Romanian farmers and rural dwellers through 2020.

Yet, the transformation has proven unequal in the agriculture and rural sector, as well as in the sector administration.

Why was this the case?

Good governance and improved institutions can drive Europe’s growth

Elisabetta Capannelli's picture
Also available in: Română


I was in London last week for a conference hosted by the European Commission and the London School of Economics and Political Science. Its purpose was to take stock of what has worked in regional development in the European Union (EU), look at existing institutional ingredients, and explore the policy mix that could help bring Europe’s lagging regions closer to the center of economic development.

What are lagging regions?

On digital revolution, skills and the future of communications

Tako Kobakhidze's picture
Also available in: Georgian

WDR2016

We find ourselves in the midst of the greatest information and communications revolution in human history. I’m not the author of this phrase, but I fully agree with it. This particular sentence made me read the entire overview of the World Development Report 2016: Digital Dividends.

I have always been wondering what does the Digital Revolution actually mean. Who, but the Co-Director of the report could have answered my question best?! Yes, I had the opportunity to interview Uwe Deichmann last week in Tbilisi. He visited Georgia as part of the ‘road-show’ to present this work of the World Bank Group team to the government, business, academia, students, and other interested audience attending the Business Forum: Innovation and Digital Economy.

Improving opportunities for Europe’s Roma children will pay off

Mariam Sherman's picture
Also available in: Română | Русский
Roma child, Romania. Photo by Jutta Benzenberg

Eight years on from the start of the global economic crisis, close to one quarter of the European Union’s population remains at risk of poverty or social exclusion. But one group in particular stands out: Europe’s growing and marginalized Roma population.

The equivalent figure for Roma children stands at 85 percent in Central and Southeastern Europe. Living conditions of marginalized Roma in this region are often more akin to those in least developed countries than what we expect in Europe.

A Remarkable Man

Meriem Gray's picture
Also available in: Română | Русский
Igor Tkach

Igor Tkach is a remarkable man.

As he stands tall and proud in the middle of one of the fields, his voice is loud and clear. And even the bitterly cold wind couldn’t stop him from telling his story. “We had absolutely nothing. Even the window frames were looted,” he said. He was talking about those turbulent times following the collapse of the Soviet Union. As he talked, I recalled my own Soviet-era childhood. What he was saying hit close to home.

Deconstructing Construction Permits in Poland

Isfandyar Zaman Khan's picture


To build we need a regulatory framework which, for the construction sector, was embodied in the construction law enacted in 1994. Just as our family grows and our housing needs change, it appears that the same holds true for some laws. This particular law has been amended 19 times in the last 19 years, resulting in a very fragmented and inconsistent legislation - think your mother in law living with her boyfriend in your spare bedroom.
 

How - and on what money - could we live to the age of 150 years?

Johannes Koettl's picture
Also available in: Русский
Retired man with his surfboard
Nature has given every species an intrinsic life span. Life span is a bit like an upper bound to life expectancy: if you got every member of a species healthier and healthier, life expectancy of that species would constantly increase, but eventually be bound by life span.

Every species has a different life span: for flies, it’s just a couple of days, for bowhead whales it’s 200 years. For humans, biologists have found that up until the 1960s, life span was around 89 years. This means that if we kept improving our health systems, the world population’s life expectancy would converge to our species’ life span of 89.

So how did we break the limits of life expectancy?

Challenges and solutions to boosting Moldova’s trade competitiveness

Gonzalo Varela's picture
Also available in: Русский | Română
Moldova Trade Study

How can Moldova shift from a growth model based on remittances and consumption to one driven by investment, productivity growth, and innovation?
 
For this small and landlocked country, integration into global markets is crucial. As such, Moldova’s National Development Strategy, “Moldova 2020”, calls for prioritizing the expansion of exports of goods and services. To boost exports, the country needs to join regional and global value chains, to become more efficient in what it already produces, and to innovate. Attracting investment, both foreign and domestic, is also key.
 
So, how is Moldova doing in this regard?

Economic diversification - the trillion dollar question: when and how?

Donato De Rosa's picture


This blog is part of an ongoing conversation on diversification

Countries with good institutions make good use of natural resource wealth, while the obverse is equally true.

However, our take diverges a little from the conventional wisdom: while it is certainly true that Norway was a strong parliamentary democracy when oil was discovered, did not have the legal and regulatory institutions to manage the oil boom. It developed them over time, as needs arose and circumstances changed. 

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