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How can Romania’s cities strengthen implementation capacity for greater development impact?

Marcel Ionescu-Heroiu's picture
Also available in: Română


The performance by new members of the European Union (EU) in achieving greater development impact and faster convergence is a key concern at the EU level. EU funds can contribute to the modernization of public infrastructure and public administration, and they are also estimated to have a net positive impact on the economy. A World Bank report, prepared for the Ministry of Regional Development and Public Administration, highlights that for every €1 invested in public infrastructure projects in Romania, an additional €2.04 are generated by the economy – a relatively high impact.
 
Romania’s absorption performance leaves much to be desired; with the exception of Croatia, Romania has registered the worst level of absorption in the Union when compared to other new member states.
 

End Poverty Day: Spreading the word through sport

Boris Ciobanu's picture
Also available in: Русский
The first day of October turned out to be quite nice in Chisinau, despite the dismal weather forecast that had threatened low temperatures and rain showers.

On this bright, sunny Saturday, a Moldovan charity held its traditional fall soccer tournament for local and international organizations, businesses, and diplomatic missions. The purpose of the tournament is a noble one – to collect funds for palliative care services to children and adults suffering from incurable and life-limiting illnesses.

And so the World Bank Moldova soccer team turned up, eager to display our dazzling foot work and dribbling skills (OK, a slight exaggeration, I admit!) A handful of injuries and business trips meant a reduced overall capacity, but that did not deter the rest of us from being determined to win.


 

To reinvigorate Europe, we need more integration… of services

Doerte Doemeland's picture
Also available in: Русский | Română


To reinvigorate growth in Europe, European Central Bank President Mario Draghi called for more common projects in the European Union (EU). And he emphasized that these efforts need to meet a set of minimum bars: they should “…focus on those actions that deliver tangible and immediately recognisable results… [they] should complement the actions of governments; they should be clearly linked to people’s immediate concerns; they should unequivocally concern matters of European or global significance.”

We couldn’t agree more.

Court budgeting – ways to improve performance and do more with less

Georgia Harley's picture
Also available in: Русский


The European Summer is over. We’ve traded our sunscreen for spreadsheets and it’s budget time. Across Europe, Ministries of Justice, Courts, and Judicial Councils are preparing their budget plans for the upcoming year. With fiscal constraint still the order of the day, staff in these offices are sharpening their scalpels, trying to figure out how to do more with less.

So in the spirit of sharing, here is a Top 10 list of how to improve court performance without spending more money.

In Armenia, is the ‘economic pie’ smaller than it should be?

Laura Bailey's picture
Also available in: Русский
Last week, I posed a provocative question – and today I would like to share some recent research by our analytical team here in Yerevan that looks at this issue in detail: what is the economic cost of Armenian women not participating in the labor market?

Is it possible that the constraints women face result in misallocated talent which constrains the overall economy and makes the economic pie artificially smaller?

In Armenia, is the ‘economic pie’ smaller than it should be?





















 

Growing the ‘economic pie’ in Armenia

Laura Bailey's picture
Also available in: Русский
In earlier posts, I highlighted the importance of creating equal opportunities for all of Armenia’s girls and boys – to learn, to grow, and to choose the ways in which they can contribute to their economy, their society, and their country. I believe that a more diversified and resilient economy, with a fuller range of options for both men and women, can help slow outmigration and ‘brain drain’, and help Armenia grow in a sustainable way.

In addition to our discussions here in Armenia about encouraging women’s participation in the labor market, we’ve also been talking about the ways in which men’s lives and livelihoods are disadvantaged, such as the persistent higher mortality rate for men throughout their adult years. And, we’ve been wondering: how do dynamics like these affect the economy and society as a whole?

Victims of crime: Service delivery and support for the most vulnerable

Georgia Harley's picture
Also available in: Русский

The news is filled with stories of crime & violence, law & order. We hear from victims and eyewitnesses. We send thoughts and prayers. But when the spotlight moves on to the next crime or the next city, the victims of crime and their families remain, trying to get back on their feet after an ordeal.  

Often, these are among the most vulnerable members of our communities.

Voices of youth: Give me hope and I’ll succeed

Gilles Cols's picture
Also available in: Русский | Français
Tajikistan is the youngest and fastest growing country in the Europe and Central Asia region, with those under 25 years old making up around 55 percent of the population. So, young people filled with enthusiasm and ambition - just like anywhere in the world - really are Tajikistan’s greatest asset.

Young women, Tajikistan

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