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urban development

On shaky ground: Housing in Europe and Central Asia

Ashna Mathema's picture
Also available in: Русский
Housing in ECA


















The social, political, and economic transition of countries across Eastern Europe, the Caucasus, and Central Asia over the last three decades has been a long and arduous process, and many challenges remain. Among them, an imminent concern is the seismic threat faced by certain housing typologies that are believed to have outlived their design lifespan, and suffer from serious deterioration and disinvestment.

Roma inclusion: leveraging opportunities for social change

Ede Ijjasz-Vasquez's picture
April 8 was International Romani Day. As we celebrate the Roma people and their culture, we must remember the serious issues they face every day: stigmatization, discrimination, exclusion, and poverty. Join Senior Director for the Social, Urban, Rural and Resilience Global Practice Ede Ijjasz-Vasquez and Senior Social Scientist Nina Bhatt as they discuss these issues.
 


 

Pięć rzeczy, których nie wiedzieliście na temat słabiej rozwiniętych regionów w Unii Europejskiej („Lagging Regions”)

Thomas Farole's picture
Also available in: English | Română
Zatem, co dalej?
 
Mając na uwadze powyższe wnioski, powstaje pytanie jak możemy najlepiej spożytkować 50 mld euro przeznaczane co roku przez UE na cele polityki spójności. Jakie działania powinny wyjść na pierwszy plan? W jakim trybie powinny być realizowane? Czy może lepiej sprawdziłyby się transfery warunkowane efektami końcowymi?
 
Komisja Europejska stawia sobie te i inne trudne pytania. Bank Światowy ma bogate doświadczenie we wdrażaniu polityk rozwoju regionalnego w różnych częściach świata. Jesteśmy gotowi współpracować z Komisją Europejską, która teraz przygotowuje się do kolejnego okresu programowania polityki spójności.
Więcej informacji:
 


Economic growth does not evenly spread within countries: some regions benefit, while other regions lag behind. This is as true in the European Union (EU) as in most other parts of the world, despite  significant convergence efforts in the EU. The leading regions in Europe have, on average, 2.3 times the GDP per capita of their poorest counterparts.

There are 5 things you (probably) didn’t know about the phenomenon of “lagging regions” within the EU.
 

5 things you (probably) didn’t know about the EU’s “Lagging regions”

Thomas Farole's picture
Also available in: Română | Polski

Economic growth does not evenly spread within countries: some regions benefit, while other regions lag behind. This is as true in the European Union (EU) as in most other parts of the world, despite  significant convergence efforts in the EU. The leading regions in Europe have, on average, 2.3 times the GDP per capita of their poorest counterparts.

There are 5 things you (probably) didn’t know about the phenomenon of “lagging regions” within the EU.
 

5 lucruri pe care (probabil) nu le știați despre “regiunile mai puțin dezvoltate” din UE

Thomas Farole's picture
Also available in: English | Polski

Creșterea economică nu este răspândită uniform la nivelul țărilor: anumite regiuni prosperă, în timp ce altele rămân în urmă. Acest fenomen se manifestă în Uniunea Europeană (UE) la fel ca și în majoritatea celorlalte zone ale lumii, în ciuda eforturilor considerabile de susținere a convergenței în UE. Regiunile cele mai dezvoltate din Europa au, în medie, un PIB de 2,3 ori mai mare pe cap de locuitor decât echivalentele lor mai sărace. Această situație este întâlnită și în interiorul aceleiași țări. În România, de exemplu, regiunea București-Ilfov depășește orașe ca Madrid, Berlin sau Budapesta din punct de vedere al PIB-ului pe cap de locuitor, însă în aceeași țară există, de asemenea, 5 regiuni care se clasifică printre cele mai sărace la nivelul întregii Uniuni Europene.

Back to school? Expanding access to disaster-resilient schools in Turkey for Syrian children and host communities

Johannes Zutt's picture
Also available in: Türkçe | Русский


Today, Turkey hosts more refugees than any other single country—almost 3.3 million. The vast majority are fleeing the civil war in Syria, and almost half are under the age of 18. A devastating consequence of the children’s flight is the disruption of their education, with about one in four Syrian refugee children in Turkey—mostly in urban areas in southeastern and southern provinces—not in school.  Even so, due to tremendous efforts by the government of Turkey, about six in ten school-aged Syrian children now have access to either formal education facilities or temporary education centers in Turkey—a remarkable achievement, given the scale of the need and the rapidity with which it developed.

By the end of 2017, the Government aims to achieve full educational enrollment for all Syrian children.

Turning Romania’s secondary cities into engines of growth

Marius Cristea's picture
Also available in: Română


On March 10, a World Bank team of urban specialists will visit Alexandru Ioan Cuza University in Iasi to engage academics, students, local authorities and stakeholders in discussing the role of secondary cities in supporting sustainable growth and improved economic opportunities in Romania.
 
Strengthening Romania’s secondary cities is vital to supporting the country’s efforts in converging faster with the EU and generating sustainable, long-term growth. In turn, rapid growth comes with a set of challenges that cannot be tackled by local authorities alone.

Assessing disaster risk in Europe and Central Asia – what did we learn?

Alanna Simpson's picture
Heavy rains on June 13-14, 2015 caused a 1 million cubic-meter landslide to flow down the Vere River valley and damage the capital city of Tbilisi, Georgia. (Photo via Wikimedia Commons)
Across the Europe and Central Asia region today, policymakers are confronted daily with a wide range of development challenges and decisions, but the potential impacts of adverse natural events and climate change – such as earthquakes or flooding – may not always be first and foremost in their thoughts.

Admittedly, the region does not face the same daunting disaster risks as some other parts of the world – especially in South Asia, East Asia and Latin America – but nevertheless, it is far from immune to the effects of natural hazards – as the past clearly reminds us.

Metropolitan development is central to Romania’s economic development

Marcel Ionescu-Heroiu's picture
Also available in: Română | Русский
Metropolitan development is important for Romania’s growth. An analysis prepared by the World Bank for the Romanian Ministry of Regional Development and Public Administration (MRDPA) indicates that Romania’s eight largest metropolitan areas (Bucharest, Brașov, Cluj-Napoca, Constanța, Craiova, Iași, Ploiești and Timișoara) concentrate 50 percent of Romania’s population and generate 75 percent of firm revenues in the country.

Metropolitan areas are the economic engines of a country, and if these engines do not work well, neither does the economy as a whole. Unfortunately, in Romania, these engines do not function properly, highlights another World Bank analysis prepared for MRDPA. There are only a few cities that have a functional metropolitan public transport system (e.g. Alba Iulia, Cluj-Napoca), few cities that have prepared spatial plans for the metropolitan area (e.g. Brăila, Brașov, Craiova), and even fewer that have managed to implement projects at the metropolitan level (e.g. Constanța).

What are some of the challenges facing metropolitan areas in Romania?

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