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Dispelling myths about surgery’s role in global health

Paul Farmer's picture



The past few decades have seen enormous changes in the global burden of disease. Although many people, especially those living in (or near) poverty and other privations, are familiar with heavy burdens and much disease, the term “global burden of disease” emerged in public health and in health economics only in recent decades. It was coined to describe what ails people, when, and where, and just as reliable quantification is difficult, so too is agreeing on units of analysis. Does this term truly describe the burden of disease of the globe? Of a nation? A city?

Better Health in Mines and Mining Communities: A Shared Responsibility

Patrick Osewe's picture



Mining can be a powerful engine for socio-economic growth. It provides critical revenue for building infrastructure in various sectors critical for prosperity and human development. In Africa, in particular, the mining sector has great potential to lift the continent’s poor out of poverty and distribute wealth from elites to citizens and from the central government to communities affected by mining operations. One area where mining revenues can have particularly transformative developmental impacts is in health.

As Ebola Ebbs, Liberia Focuses on Getting Back to Work

Errol Graham's picture
© UNICEF/NYHQ2014-3122/Nesbitt


In Liberia, the number of weekly new cases of Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) has fallen sharply since November 2014, and domestic “aversion behavior” due to the crisis is abating. There is greater mobility of people, as reflected in the reopening of markets and increasing petrol sales. The government is more bullish about the future course of the epidemic and has lifted curfews, recalled furloughed civil servants, and opened borders, and is reopening schools, shuttered since the onset of the crisis.

A Wake-Up Call: Lessons from Ebola for the world’s health systems

Justin Forsyth's picture
Also available in: Français
© UNICEF/NYHQ2015-0139/Naftalin



We all know the dreadful toll that Ebola has taken in Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia. It is not over. A conference today in Brussels is trying to maintain international support for the job of reaching zero cases and helping these countries to recover. Save the Children has seen this first hand, helping to fight Ebola in all three countries. As these efforts continue, we must also learn some lessons which apply to all countries. The reasons for Ebola spreading are complex but a new report we launch today – A Wake-Up Call - focuses on the way that the inadequate health services in the countries ensured that Ebola could not be quickly contained, reversed or mitigated. Their dangerously under-funded, under-staffed, poorly-equipped and fragmented health services were quickly overwhelmed and needed massive international help to start to fight back. Donors have had to play a vital role, especially the UK in Sierra Leone, the USA in Liberia and France in Guinea.

Helping farmers prevent hunger in Ebola-hit countries

Abdoulaye Toure's picture
Also available in: Français
Photo credit: Guido Fuà


Most people are aware of Ebola's devastating impact on human health. To date, over 22,800 people have been infected and 9,000 have died. Its effects on West Africa's economy have also been well-documented. According to recent World Bank estimates, Ebola will cause at least US$ 1.6 billion in lost economic growth in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone in 2015.

Vaccines Save Lives!

Patricio V. Marquez's picture
photo (c) GAVI: The Vaccine Alliance

Measles cases in U.S. highlight need to eliminate vaccine-preventable diseases everywhere

The news media in the United States and abroad has been abuzz in recent days focusing on the measles outbreak at Disneyland.  The irony of this situation is that measles, after being officially eliminated in the United States in 2000, reappeared in 2014 with 644 cases in 27 states as reported by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (US CDC).  The reason is simple:  while in the 1980s, more than 97% of one-year olds in the United States were routinely vaccinated, the current share has fallen to 91%, facilitated by exemptions in some states that permit parents to “opt out” of vaccinating children on the basis of religious or personal beliefs. In other parts of the world,  continued measles outbreaks in Europe, sub-Saharan Africa and Southern Asia have also occurred due to weak routine immunization systems and delayed implementation of accelerated disease control.

The Obesity Epidemic and the Battle for What Our Kids Eat at School

María Eugenia Bonilla-Chacín's picture


I recently read in a newspaper about a video of an obese 12-year-old who collapsed at school in Mexico and later died from a heart attack.  Although the newspaper could not certify the veracity of the video, it is an awful reminder of the large burden of overweight and obesity, suffered not only by adults but children in Mexico and other developing countries.

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