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Ethiopia’s new tobacco control law: a step forward that needs to be complemented by higher taxes!

Patricio V. Marquez's picture



Recently, Ethiopia’s parliament unanimously approved one of Africa’s strongest anti-tobacco laws.  Ethiopia’s new tobacco control law is comprehensive as it requires 100 percent smoke-free public and work places, bans tobacco advertising and promotions, restricts the sale of flavored tobacco products and mandates pictorial warning labels covering 70 percent of the front and back of all tobacco products. The law also bans the sale of heated tobacco products, e-cigarettes and shisha, and prohibits tobacco sales to anyone under the age of 21.

Confronting tobacco illicit trade: a global review of country experiences

Sheila Dutta's picture



Illicit trade in tobacco products undermines global tobacco prevention and control interventions, particularly with respect to tobacco tax policy. From a public health perspective, illicit trade weakens the effect of tobacco excise taxes on tobacco consumption - and consequently on preventable morbidity and mortality - by increasing the affordability, attractiveness, and/or availability of tobacco products. Furthermore, tobacco illicit trade often depends on and can contribute to weakened governance.

Climate change and malnutrition must be tackled together

Meera Shekar's picture

Meera Shekhar served as Commissioner representing the World Bank Group on the Lancet Commission on Obesity



As climate change challenge continues to worsen, its impacts extend far beyond the extensive damage to the environment—it also has a direct effect on global health, including obesity and undernutrition.
 
Obesity, undernutrition and climate change have generally been viewed as separate concerns. But a new report released this week --  The Global Syndemic of Obesity, Undernutrition, and Climate Change: The Lancet Commission Report -- shows that these three interconnected agendas –termed a “syndemic” must be tackled together, with synergistic actions, to really create transformative and lasting change.

A personal perspective from the medical care frontlines

Patricio V. Marquez's picture
Image courtesy Patricio Marquez

Despite health-promotion and disease-prevention efforts, we are all at risk of catastrophic health events, which can strike at any moment, in the form of a traffic injury, a newly discovered tumor, a brain hemorrhage, or another sudden affliction affecting us or someone we love.  When such events occur, we may abruptly face life-and-death situations that teach us first-hand the critical importance of timely access to medical care.

Financing the health systems of the future: A proposed framework for including non-communicable diseases

Arin Dutta's picture
 
Photo courtesy of Jessica DuVernay

This blog first appeared on Medium, Financing the Health Systems of the Future: A Proposed Framework for Including Non-Communicable Diseases

series of studies put out by the Lancet in 2017 highlighted the urgent challenge that health systems face in addressing a growing burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) — diseases that now account for nearly three-quarters of global deaths and will grow to more than 80 percent by 2040.

Why investing in health is critical for addressing gender-based violence in fragile settings

Sameera Al Tuwaijri's picture

Globally, over one-third of women report having experienced some form of physical or sexual violence. Many cases of violence, such as domestic abuse and rape, are underreported, so the true incidence of gender-based violence (GBV) is actually much higher.  

Building human capital starts with health

Tim Evans's picture
Mothers register their babies while seeking health care at the Primary Health Centre New Karu, in Karu Village, Nigeria on June 19, 2018. Photo © Dominic Chavez/GFF

Health is a foundational investment in a country’s human capital.   Will a child live to celebrate her fifth birthday and be ready to attend school? Will she actually be able to learn and thrive in school? Will she grow to be an adult who can productively contribute to the society in which she lives?  All of this depends on robust health and nutrition, at every stage in her life.

All hands on deck: Halting the vicious circle of stunting in Sub-Saharan Africa

Emmanuel Skoufias's picture
Betty teaches mothers with small children about nutrition, Uganda. Photo: © Stephan Gladieu / World Bank

In a large, complex, or urgent situation, the command goes out: “All hands on deck!”

Sub-Saharan Africa faces such a clarion call now. It is the only region in the world with a growing number of children under the age of five who have stunted growth, meaning they are too short for their age. Although the number of children affected by stunting globally has decreased drastically since 1990, Africa is the only region that has seen an increase in the number of children stunted despite a decrease in the prevalence of stunting.

Antimicrobial resistance is a priority issue for all people

Juergen Voegele's picture
Bogota, Colombia. Photo credit: Dominic Chavez/World Bank

If, like most people, you think antimicrobial resistance is something that only doctors and scientists need to worry about, you should probably think again.
 
We humans have co-evolved with microbes for millions of years.  Our bodies have provided a safe environment for thousands of species of microbes to flourish and in return microbes have provided us with many benefits – like protection against “bad” organisms and regulation of many of our physiological processes.  We now know that a healthy, balanced microbiome is essential to human wellbeing.

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