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Africa

Five lessons from Nigeria's polio eradication efforts

Ayodeji Oluwole Odutolu's picture
Dr. Andrew Etsano, Incident Manager of the Nigeria Polio Emergency Operation Center
President Buhari of Nigeria vaccinates his 3-month-old granddaughter to mark one year of no polio cases in Nigeria.

​Photo courtesy of Dr. Andrew Etsano, Incident Manager of the Nigeria Polio Emergency Operation Center

On July 24th Nigeria celebrated a huge milestone in the global effort to eradicate polio. It has been one year since the country has had a case of wild polio. This means that it has interrupted transmission of the crippling disease.

Global Financing Facility and a new era for development finance

Tim Evans's picture



This week at the Third International Financing for Development Conference in Addis Ababa, we’ve seen the birth of a new era in global health financing.
 
The World Bank Group, together with our partners in the United Nations, Canada, Norway, and the United States, just launched the Global Financing Facility in support of Every Woman Every Child.  It’s hard to believe it’s been less than 10 months since the GFF was first announced at the 2014 UN General Assembly by World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim, UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, Prime Minister Stephen Harper of Canada and Prime Minister Erna Solberg of Norway.  We’re grateful to the hundreds of representatives from developing countries, UN agencies, bilateral and multilateral development partners, civil society and the private sector who have contributed their time, ideas, and expertise to inform and shape the design of the GFF to get it ready to become operational.   

Global Financing Facility ushers in new era for every woman, every child

Melanie Mayhew's picture
A New Era for Every Woman, Every Child


This week in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, during the Third International Financing for Development Conference, the United Nations, along with the World Bank Group, and the governments of Canada, Norway and the United States, joined country and global health leaders to launch the Global Financing Facility (GFF) in support of Every Woman Every Child. Partners announced that $12 billion in domestic and international, private and public funding had already been aligned to country-led five-year investment plans for women’s, children’s and adolescents’ health in the four GFF front-runner countries: Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Kenya and Tanzania.

Population and development: An unfinished agenda

Abdo S. Yazbeck's picture
Health Care Workers
Photo by Dominic Chavez/ World Bank

Forty-five years ago, the World Bank began a major shift in its approach to development.  Prior to the 1970s, the Bank’s overwhelming focus was on infrastructure projects, consistent with our origins as an agency focused on post World War II reconstruction.  The later shift came with recognition that sustained economic development had a lot to do with human development, not just physical development, which led to our first projects on population.   In the early years, these focused  on the Caribbean, North Africa and South and East Asia, and were underpinned by recognition that population dynamics have direct impact on poverty, health, human capital and economic growth. 

Better Health in Mines and Mining Communities: A Shared Responsibility

Patrick Osewe's picture



Mining can be a powerful engine for socio-economic growth. It provides critical revenue for building infrastructure in various sectors critical for prosperity and human development. In Africa, in particular, the mining sector has great potential to lift the continent’s poor out of poverty and distribute wealth from elites to citizens and from the central government to communities affected by mining operations. One area where mining revenues can have particularly transformative developmental impacts is in health.

As Ebola Ebbs, Liberia Focuses on Getting Back to Work

Errol Graham's picture
© UNICEF/NYHQ2014-3122/Nesbitt


In Liberia, the number of weekly new cases of Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) has fallen sharply since November 2014, and domestic “aversion behavior” due to the crisis is abating. There is greater mobility of people, as reflected in the reopening of markets and increasing petrol sales. The government is more bullish about the future course of the epidemic and has lifted curfews, recalled furloughed civil servants, and opened borders, and is reopening schools, shuttered since the onset of the crisis.

Ebola : agir au plus près des agriculteurs pour éviter que les pays les plus touchés ne souffrent de la faim

Abdoulaye Toure's picture
Also available in: English
Crédit photo: Guido Fuà

On sait que l’épidémie d’Ebola a eu un impact dévastateur sur le plan de la santé, avec, à ce jour, 21 000 personnes infectées et 8 000 décédées. On connaît aussi ses effets sur l’économie de l’Afrique de l’Ouest : selon les dernières estimations de la Banque mondiale, la crise Ebola se chiffrera en 2015 à au moins 1,6 milliard de dollars de pertes de croissance pour la Guinée, le Libéria et la Sierra Leone.

Helping farmers prevent hunger in Ebola-hit countries

Abdoulaye Toure's picture
Also available in: Français
Photo credit: Guido Fuà


Most people are aware of Ebola's devastating impact on human health. To date, over 22,800 people have been infected and 9,000 have died. Its effects on West Africa's economy have also been well-documented. According to recent World Bank estimates, Ebola will cause at least US$ 1.6 billion in lost economic growth in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone in 2015.

Ebola Response: Reflections from West Africa

Tim Evans's picture

Last week, I had the opportunity to visit several communities affected by Ebola in Liberia and Guinea. While I saw clear signs of progress in terms of destigmatization and family support, we can’t for one second take our foot off the accelerator in pushing forward on our response to this crisis. There’s a long way to go until we reach zero cases. Here are some of my reflections from the trip.

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