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Early childhood development (ECD)

Why The First 1,000 Days Matter Most

Roger Thurow's picture



This blog first appeared in the New York Times on June 20, 2016.

Nutrition is not only fundamental to an individual’s cognitive and physical growth, it is also the cornerstone of all development efforts, whether improving education, health, income or equality, at home or abroad. And the most important time for good nutrition is in the 1,000 days from the beginning of a woman’s pregnancy to the second birthday of her child. What happens in those first days determines to a large extent the course of a child’s life – his or her ability to grow, learn, work, succeed – and, by extension, the long-term health, stability and prosperity of the society in which that child lives.

The Obesity Epidemic and the Battle for What Our Kids Eat at School

María Eugenia Bonilla-Chacín's picture


I recently read in a newspaper about a video of an obese 12-year-old who collapsed at school in Mexico and later died from a heart attack.  Although the newspaper could not certify the veracity of the video, it is an awful reminder of the large burden of overweight and obesity, suffered not only by adults but children in Mexico and other developing countries.