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Gender

Healthy women are the cornerstone of healthy societies

Patricio V. Marquez's picture
Photo: Ivelina Taushanova / World Bank

On a recent road trip over the holidays, one of us had a good chat with his college-aged daughter about her views on gender. She was quite adamant in rejecting arguments voiced by some people about “innate intellectual differences” between males and females. She views these arguments as sexism that ignores the fact that there are women who are not getting the same opportunities as men because they are subject to cultural norms that limit their potential. 

Family Health Days – An Inspiration for International Women’s Day

Quentin Wodon's picture



On March 8, in celebration of International Women’s Day, Marion Bunch, Chief Executive Officer, Rotarians for Family Health & AIDS Prevention and founder of family health days, will participate in a World Bank event about inspiring women who made a difference in the world through innovative programs in the areas of education and health.

Closing health gaps for women: The Botswana story

Patricio V. Marquez's picture
HPV vaccine being administered in Botswana. Photo: Ministry of Health of Botswana


​The World Bank Group’s new Gender Equality Strategy for 2016-2023, launched last week, addresses gender inclusion not just as a goal in and of itself, but one critical to development effectiveness.  

Child marriage: A persistent hurdle to health and prosperity

Quentin Wodon's picture

Also available in: العربية



On this Sunday, October 11, the world marks the International Day of the Girl Child. While the day is an opportunity to advocate for girls’ rights across many sectors, one persistent, pernicious issue deserves renewed attention:  the high prevalence of child marriage.

Global Health Weekly Links: March 21, 2014

Julia Ross's picture
Our Global Health Links this week highlight content for World Water Day (Mar 22) and World Tuberculosis Day (Mar 24).

Each Friday, we share a selection of global health Tweets, infographics, stories, blog posts, videos and other content of note. For more, follow us @worldbankhealth.
 
Global Health Weekly Links: March 21, 2014

La lutte contre le sida et la pauvreté passe par l’autonomisation des femmes et des filles

Jeni Klugman's picture
Also available in: English


« On ne mange pas un bonbon avec son papier ». C’est ainsi que de jeunes Sud-Africains justifient leur refus de porter un préservatif. Malgré les risques élevés d’infection par le VIH, que personne n’ignore ou presque. Une étude récente (a) de la Banque mondiale a ainsi constaté que le préservatif était souvent vécu par les hommes comme une atteinte à leur virilité et que les femmes n’osaient pas insister.

Empowering Women, Girls is Vital To Tackling AIDS, Poverty

Jeni Klugman's picture
Also available in: Français


“You cannot eat a sweet with the wrapping,” young men from South Africa told researchers as part of a recent World Bank study, explaining why they refuse to wear condoms despite a high and well-known risk of HIV. Men often don’t see condoms as manly, and women feel unable to insist.

What does this mean? A 2011 Gallup poll of 19 sub-Saharan African countries, home to more than two-thirds of the world's HIV-infected population, found most adults know how to prevent the spread of HIV. But while 72 percent agreed people should use latex condoms every time they have sex, only 40 percent said they ever had.

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