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Scaling Up Effective Programs – Kenya and Liberia Edition

David Evans's picture
This page in: français

Over the last decade, both Kenya and Liberia have sought to scale up successful pilot programs that help children to learn to read. Even as more and more impact evaluations are of programs at scale, pilots still constitute a significant portion of what we test. That’s with good reason: Governments wisely seek to pilot and test programs before expending valuable resources in implementing a program across the country. Last year, I wrote about how the Indian organization Pratham worked with J-PAL to test effective programs to improve reading iteratively, varying different parameters in terms of who was implementing (government teachers versus volunteers) and when (in-school versus during the holidays).

Weekly Links, April 7: Unpaywall, good and fake news from Malawi, doing research in conflict zones, and more...

Berk Ozler's picture
  • Just this week, I provided a journalist with a bunch of citations, most of which she could not access. Perhaps, no more? LSE Impact Blog discusses the Unpaywall: "The extension is called Unpaywall, and it’s powered by an open index of more than ten million legally-uploaded, open access resources. Reports from our pre-release are great: “Unpaywall found a full-text copy 53% of the time,” reports librarian, Lydia Thorne. Fisheries researcher Lachlan Fetterplace used Unpaywall to find “about 60% of the articles I tested. This one is a great tool and I suspect it will only get better.” And indeed it has! We’re now getting full-text on 85% of 2016’s most-covered research papers."  

In the medium term, school rules!

Markus Goldstein's picture
The past decades have seen large increase in primary enrollment, and a closing (for most, but not all, countries) of the gender gap in enrolment.    The next step is to look at secondary school.   A nice new paper by Esther Duflo, Pascaline Dupas and Michael Kremer looks at what happens when you make it accessible to more young people.
 

Development Impact turns 6: six questions for our sixth birthday

David McKenzie's picture
We are proud to have kept the blog going for another year, and would like to note its 6th birthday. In lieu of presents, we’d love your thoughts on what things you would like to see more or less of going forward. In particular, any comments or feedback on the following would be great:

Weekly links March 31: inequality across firms and within households, measuring farm labor, should we fund research by lottery, and more…

David McKenzie's picture
  • In the Harvard Business Review, Nick Bloom discusses how a lot of inequality is getting driven by differences between firms: “companies are paying more to get more: boosting salaries to recruit top talent or to add workers with sought-after skills. The result is that highly skilled and well-educated workers flock to companies that can afford to offer generous salaries, benefits, and perks — and further fuel their companies’ momentum. Employees in less-successful companies continue to be poorly paid and their companies fall further behind”
  • Vox EU piece by Brown, van de Walle and Ravallion summarizing their work in two recent papers on the difficulties in targeting the poor “about three-quarters of underweight women and undernourished children are not found in the poorest 20% of households. This is consistent with evidence of considerable intra-household inequality”

10 journals for publishing a short economics paper

David Evans's picture
In the middle of the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, I noticed that there were numbers being released on the number of orphans the outbreak was creating, but no transparent methodology for where those numbers were coming from. My colleague Anna Popova and I constructed numbers based on age- and gender-specific mortality and fertility rates, and we submitted the paper to the Lancet. It was a short but – we thought – useful paper.

Should I stay or should I go? Marriage markets and household consumption

Berk Ozler's picture

“We propose a model of the household with consumption, production and revealed preference conditions for stability on the marriage market. We define marital instability in terms of the consumption gains to remarrying another individual in the same marriage market, and to being single. We find that a 1 percentage point increase in the wife’s estimated consumption gains from remarriage is significantly associated with a 0.6 percentage point increase in divorce probability in the next three years.”

Weekly links March 24: why those of us in our 40s matter so much, an ALMP program that may be working, more CSAE round-ups, and more…

David McKenzie's picture

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