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Teacher Coaching: What We Know

David Evans's picture
“Teacher coaching has emerged as a promising alternative to traditional models of professional development.” In Kraft, Blazar, and Hogan’s newly updated review “The Effect of Teacher Coaching on Instruction and Achievement: A Meta-Analysis of the Causal Evidence,” they highlight that reviews of the literature on teacher professional development (i.e., training teachers who are already on the job) highlight a few promising characteristics of effect

Weekly links June 30: 7th grade development economics, the beginning at the end approach, stuff that happened a long time ago still impacts today, and more…

David McKenzie's picture
  • How to teach development economics in 20 minutes to 7th graders – Dave Evans explains his method.
  • The “beginning at the end” approach to experimentation – written from the point of view of business start-ups, but could easily apply to policy experiment work too “The typical approach to research is to start with a problem. In business, this often leads to identifying a lot of vague unknowns—a “broad area of ignorance” as Andreasen calls it—and leaves a loosely defined goal of simply reducing ignorance…“Beginning at the end” means that you determine what decision you’ll make when you know the results of your research, first, and let that dictate what data you need to collect and what your results need to look like in order to make that decision.”

Can temporary subsidies and agricultural extension build sustainable adoption?

Markus Goldstein's picture
A fair number of governments in developing countries support agricultural subsidy programs.   One of the arguments for these subsidies is that there is some kind of market failure (information is often cited) that the subsidy is meant to overcome.    So, that means when the subsidy is removed (which is the politically hard part), we should see adoption sustained.    There isn’t much clear evidence on this, but two recent papers provide some insight.
  

Should we require balance t-tests of baseline observables in randomized experiments?

David McKenzie's picture

I received an email recently from a major funder of impact evaluations who wanted my advice on the following question regarding testing baseline balance in randomized experiments:

Should we continue to ask our grantees to do t-tests and f-tests to assess the differences in the variables in the balance tables during the baseline?  

Weekly links June 23: VoxDev launches, uncountable Nigerians, a challenge to prospect theory, and more…

David McKenzie's picture

Odds are you’re measuring son preference incorrectly

Seema Jayachandran's picture
When investigating son-biased fertility preferences, the Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) offer the go-to survey questions:
  • If you could go back to the time you did not have any children and could choose exactly the number of children to have in your whole life, how many would that be?
  • How many of these children would you like to be boys, how many would you like to be girls, and for how many would it not matter if it’s a boy or a girl?

Weekly links June 16: why women earn less, teaching fintech, now class size doesn’t matter, and more…

David McKenzie's picture
  • Women in Economics at Berkeley has a great summer reading list of recent papers which look at the gender earnings gap in different ways, including short summaries of some very recently published papers in the AER, QJE, and JPE on this issue.
  • The NYTimes on how business schools are trying to teach fintech, although with no agreement on what this means or how to do it.

The Puzzle with LARCs

Berk Ozler's picture

Suppose that you’re at your doctor’s office, discussing an important health issue that may become a concern in the near future. There are multiple drugs available in the market that you can use to prevent unwanted outcomes. Some of them are so effective that there is practically no chance you will have a negative event if you start taking them. Effectiveness of the other options range from 94% to much lower, with the most commonly used drug failing about 10% of the time for the typical user. Somehow, you go home with the drug that has a one in 10 failure rate: worse, you’re not alone; most people end up in the same boat…

Any chance to use impact evaluations with no impact? : The Mexican Case – Guest Post by Gonzalo Hernández Licona

Gonzalo was part of a panel with David McKenzie at a recent meeting of the Impact Evaluation Network (IEN). One of the questions during this discussion was whether there were good examples of cases where impact evaluations had found null or negative results, and policymakers had actually changed policy as a result. We thought others would be interested in hearing his examples from Mexico.

It feels like a cold water shower when impact evaluations (IEs) do not show positive impacts. Those studies are neither sexy for academic publication nor for public policy use. But the fact that some IEs show no impact of certain programs or projects, it’s an important piece of information!

I would like to suggest here that if a country has an institutional and relatively credible Monitoring and Evaluation System (M&E), the chances of using IEs with no impact increase.

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