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Mexico

Four policy approaches to support job creation through Global Value Chains

Ruchira Kumar's picture
 Maria Fleischmann / World Bank

Mexico created over 60,000 jobs between 1993 to 2000 upgrading the apparel value chain from assembly to direct distribution to customers.  (Photo: Maria Fleischmann / World Bank)

As we discussed in our previous post, Global Value Chains can lead to the creation of more, inclusive and better jobs. GVCs can be a win-win for firms that create better jobs while they enjoy greater efficiency, productivity, and profits. However, there is a potential trade-off between increasing competitiveness and job creation, and the exact nature of positive labor market outcomes depends on several parameters. Given the cross-border (and, therefore, multiple jurisdictive) nature of GVCs, national policy choices to strengthen positive labor outcomes are limited. However, national governments can make policy decisions to facilitate GVC participation that is commensurate with positive labor market outcomes.

Three policies to promote a more inclusive future of work

Luc Christiaensen's picture
 Arne Hoel/World Bank
Even if the technologies are available, businesses and individuals often lack the necessary skills to use them. And these skill gaps exist at multiple levels. 
(Photo: Arne Hoel/World Bank)

As we explained in previous posts, digital technologies present both threats and opportunities for the employment agenda in developing countries. Yet many countries lack the means to take full advantage of these opportunities, because of limited access to technology, a lack of skills, and the absence of a broad enabling environment, the so-called “analog” complements.


A perspective on jobs from the G20

Luc Christiaensen's picture
Factory workers in Ghana
When talking about the Future of Work, it is important to go beyond discussing robots and changes in employer-worker relationships; these might not be the primary labor market problem that low-income countries face. (Photo: Dominic Chavez/World Bank)

On May 18-19, the G20 Ministers of Labor met in Bad Neuenahr, Germany to discuss and adopt their annual Labor and Employment Ministerial Meeting (LEMM) Declaration advocating for "an integrated set of policies that places people and jobs at center stage." In this, the meeting did not shy away from some of the more thorny issues to reach the overarching goal of fostering "inclusive growth and a global economy that works for everyone." It focused on the much-feared future-of-work, the longstanding challenge of more and better employment for women, better integration of recognized migrants and refugees in domestic labor markets, and ensuring decent work in the international supply chains.  

Partnering to measure impacts of private sector projects on job creation

Alvaro Gonzalez's picture
Worker in Ghana
For the poor and vulnerable of the world, jobs are key to ending poverty and driving development. But not all jobs are equally transformational.  
Photo: Jonathan Ernst / World Bank

Jobs are what we earn, what we do, and sometimes even who we are. For the poor and vulnerable of the world, jobs are key to ending poverty and driving development. But not all jobs are equally transformational. Good jobs add value to society, taking into account the benefits they have on the people who hold them, and the potential spillover effects on others. For example, inclusive jobs, such as those that employ women, can change the way families spend money and invest in the education and health of children.  

New Varieties of Orchids for Mexico

Dennis Szesko's picture

Dennis Szeszko's passion for exploration and discovery has yielded not only a venture-backed start-up company in Mexico but also new varieties of orchids for the international commercial flower market –  ones that are hybridized to be grown without soil. The JKP spoke with him about he created his business, the skills that are useful for being an entrepreneur, and how policymakers can encourage new firms, especially in agriculture, as farmers try to switch over to higher-value crops.

Making Jobs a Priority in Mexico

Constantino González's picture

As part of the search for new ideas on tackling the high global level of youth unemployment, we spoke with Constantino Gonzalez, a young political leader with the Nueva Alianza Party in Mexico. To break down the obstacles to political inaction on an agenda for creation, Gonzalez suggests that the initiative should come from the local level, with all stakeholders together building a common jobs agenda. He urges youth to explore entrepreneurship and politics to help shape their communities and country.

The Endeavor Model: High-Impact Entrepreneurs

Fernando Fabre's picture

Developing countries are often counseled to encourage entrepreneurship as a way to boost growth and create jobs. But the way to do that often isn't clear, given that these countries may not have much experience with role models, management expertise, and access to smart capital, to name just a few likely barriers. One innovative effort under way in this regard is Endeavor Global, a nonprofit that tries to help transform emerging countries by establishing High-Impact Entrepreneurship as the leading force for sustainable economic development. We spoke with its President, Fernando Fabre.