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What LinkedIn data can tell us about tackling youth unemployment

Namita Datta's picture
Youth employment programs should place more emphasis on mentoring youth on how to self-assess their existing skills - including soft skills - and how to better signal these skills to employers. (Photo: Grant Ellis / World Bank Group)


Finding a good job is increasingly difficult – especially for young people. Globally, young people are up to four times more likely to be unemployed than adults.  Furthermore, the lack of opportunity can have devastating consequences for their long-term employment outcomes. Youth often lack the skills and competencies that are in high demand from employers, but they also face information gaps about which relevant skills they should signal to prospective employers.
 
To better understand youth and skills trends in emerging markets, the Solutions for Youth Employment (S4YE) Coalition embarked on a research collaboration with LinkedIn to analyze demand and supply side data from 390,000 entry-level job postings and 6.4 million LinkedIn profiles of young people (aged 21-29) in four diverse middle-income countries. Using big data analytics, the recently released report The Skills Gap or Signaling Gap: Insights from LinkedIn in emerging markets of Brazil, India, Indonesia, and South Africa brings the following three insights on what skills employers in those countries are looking for in youth hires.

Can Africa grow its manufacturing sector & create jobs?

Francois Steenkamp's picture
Africa jobs
Since 2008, the share of manufacturing in GDP across Africa has stagnated at around 10%, calling into question if African economies have undergone structural transformation vital to sustained economic growth. Photo: Curt Carnemark / World Bank

Over the past decade and a half, Sub-Saharan Africa has experienced rapid economic growth at an average annual rate of 5.5%. But since 2008, the share of manufacturing in GDP across the continent has stagnated at around 10%.  This calls into question as to whether African economies have undergone structural transformation – the reallocation of economic activity across broad sectors -- which is considered vital for sustained economic growth in the long-run.

Partnering to measure impacts of private sector projects on job creation

Alvaro Gonzalez's picture
Worker in Ghana
For the poor and vulnerable of the world, jobs are key to ending poverty and driving development. But not all jobs are equally transformational.  
Photo: Jonathan Ernst / World Bank

Jobs are what we earn, what we do, and sometimes even who we are. For the poor and vulnerable of the world, jobs are key to ending poverty and driving development. But not all jobs are equally transformational. Good jobs add value to society, taking into account the benefits they have on the people who hold them, and the potential spillover effects on others. For example, inclusive jobs, such as those that employ women, can change the way families spend money and invest in the education and health of children.  

What our 10 best read blogs are telling us

Nicholas Charles Lord's picture
 Construction workers from Egypt are building stronger river banks along the Nile river to protect it from erosion. Photo © Dominic Chavez/World Bank

Summer is a time for reflection, for taking stock and seeing what is trending. So far this year, the Jobs Group has published 39 blogs on a wide range of topics. But what blogs have resonated most with our readers? Below you will find our most-read blog posts. In true top ten style, they are presented them in reverse order.

Jobs and health in South Africa

Chijioke O. Nwosu's picture
Despite being one of the richest countries in Africa, South Africa is characterized by a low labor force participation (LFP) and very high unemployment rates. Excluding the unemployed who are not looking for jobs from the pool of participants, the LFP rate declined from 59.4% in 2001 to 57.2% in 2005, and 54.3% in the final quarter of 2011. Though there has been a slight increase recently, it still remains below most sub-Saharan African countries. Unemployment remains stubbornly high at around 25%. Youth unemployment is even more chronic: the unemployment rate among youth aged 15-24 years exceeds 50%. These low participation and very high unemployment rates have far-reaching implications for economic growth and the sustainability of South Africa’s extensive tax-funded social welfare system.

Targeting Youth to Reduce South Africa’s Unemployment

Ingrid Woolard's picture

IT training for kids who live in the surrounding farm areas of Stutterheim outside East London in the Eastern Cape. South Africa. Photo: Trevor Samson / World Bank

Globally youth are, on average, nearly three times more likely to be unemployed than older adults. In South Africa this problem has been exacerbated by the global downturn. When the economy slowed down, youth unemployment began to rise sooner than adult unemployment, suggesting that younger people are more vulnerable to changing economic conditions. The question arises whether interventions should focus on youth among the unemployed. I would argue that interventions should specifically target youth, as they face some significant barriers to entering the labor market.

Checking Up on Agricultural Minimum Wages in South Africa

Haroon Bhorat's picture

In the developing world, there is a lively debate surrounding how minimum wages affect jobs, poverty, and income distribution. To shed light on the issue in South Africa, Haroon Bhorat, Ravi Kanbur, and Benjamin Stanwix recently did a study on the impact of the introduction in March 2003 of a minimum wage law in the agricultural sector. We spoke with Bhorat – a Professor of Economics at the University of Cape Town and an economic advisor to the Minister of Finance – on their findings.