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job creation

Skills, Gender and the Future of Jobs: 2017 End of Summer Reading List

Esteve Sala's picture
These recommended readings have one thing in common: they analyze the challenges ahead through different lenses.
(Photo: Dominic Chavez / World Bank)


If you are looking for a good reading list before the summer ends, we’ve compiled a selection of five recent papers and publications that touch on jobs and changing landscape of labor markets. These recommended readings have one thing in common: they analyze the challenges ahead through different lenses. How is the labor market recovering after the economic crisis? Can life-long learning become workers’ strategy for upskilling in a digital economy? Have countries improved in reducing gender gap at work? What policies can support job creation?

The effects of minimum wages on jobs: Lessons from Seattle

Hernan Winkler's picture
Minimum wages around the world are most frequently set at around 40 percent of mean salaries. (Photo: Simone D. McCourtie / World Bank)

What can labor ministers in the developing world learn from the heated debate on minimum wages that Seattle’s dramatic reforms reignited? The answer may be confusion. After more than 6,000 scientific articles, the discussion on the costs and benefits of raising minimum wages is still one of those unresolved million-dollar questions: Many economists claim that it is a very effective way to guarantee decent jobs for workers and to reduce inequality, but other economists and policymakers seem convinced that it would do just the opposite. The recent experiment in Seattle, unfortunately, adds little clarity.

From structural adjustment to structural change: why jobs are the key to development

Dino Merotto's picture
As a professional economist for 25 years, I’m intrigued to see academic thinking towards growth and development swing back to where it was when I was a boy; structural change. As development partners, we need to re-think structural policy priorities to achieve shared prosperity by looking at countries through a jobs lens. The Bank has developed a jobs diagnostic tool kit to help with that process.

Moving up the garment industry’s global value chain

Paul Lister's picture

Many African countries are striving to move up the global value chain in the footsteps of countries like China and (more recently) Bangladesh. We asked Paul Lister – Director of Legal Services and Company Secretary, Associated British Foods (ABF) – how ABF and its subsidiaries determine where it will source goods. He says that in the end, efficiency is key.

Textiles in Bongooo Bazaar, Dhaka, Bangladesh. Photo: Flickr @ dnevill (Dan Nevill)

Bangladesh’s inclusive Central Bank

Atiur Rahman's picture

Bangladesh is now the world’s second largest apparel exporter after China. Its garment industry accounts for 80% of its overall exports and around 4 million jobs. Atiur Rahman, Governor of the Central Bank of Bangladesh, tells us that the government sees employment (both formal and informal) as the link between growth and poverty reduction, with an emphasis on inclusive growth policy and financial inclusion.

Workers in the Wool Tex Sweaters Limited in Shewrapara, Dhaka. Photo: Abir Abdullah/ADB