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Ushering in a new era for jobs and economic transformation through IDA18

Thomas Farole's picture
With IDA18, new approaches to operations, new financial instruments, as well as new analytics and tools will help ensure we deliver on the jobs agenda. Photo: © John Hogg/World Bank

On December 14th and 15th donor and borrower country representatives of the World Bank Group will meet in Yogyakarta, Indonesia to finalize details for the 18th replenishment of IDA. The final agreement on IDA18 is expected to usher in a new era for IDA, the Bank’s fund for the poorest, dramatically increasing the level of financing and the potential for impact on development for the world’s poorest countries.
 
Central to the discussions on IDA over the past year has been the issue of jobs – how to deliver more jobs to meet the demands of a growing youth population; how best to improve job quality, particularly for the vast majority of workers in IDA countries who struggle in subsistence-level self-employment and other forms of informal employment; and how to make jobs more inclusive to women, youth, and populations in remote and lagging regions.

Women’s jobs at risk from tech disruption

Samantha Amerasinghe's picture
Samantha Amerasinghe, a guest blogger, is an economist for the Thematic Research team at Standard Chartered. 
Giving women access to the skills and qualifications in areas where jobs will be created is vital. Photo: Dominic Chavez/ World Bank

Dubbed the ‘fourth industrial revolution’, technology disruption could be a key growth driver for economies over the coming years. But for women, advances in technology also pose a threat, as many of their jobs could be displaced. A perfect storm of technological trends, from mobile internet and cloud technology to ‘big data’ and the ‘internet of things’, means that, as new work trends evolve, existing gender inequalities could worsen further.

In Zambia, agribusiness creates potential for job growth

Lillian Foo's picture
 
Street market in Chiansi village, Zambia. Photo: Lillian Foo

Zambia is currently under pressure to increase the pace of the economic transformation to create more productive jobs. Despite rapid economic growth from 2000-2013, the country is struggling to provide the kind of jobs needed to help spur sustainable growth and development.  The landlocked country is also one of Africa’s youngest countries by median age, and youth (aged 15-24) who are a significant and increasing share of the working population, are finding it hard to get jobs.

Making the future of work more inclusive and equitable

Siddhartha Raja's picture
Public policies could shape how the costs of digitization can be managed, to counter inequality and mitigate the costs for the poorest. Photo: Dominic Chavez/World Bank

There is much speculation about what share of jobs might be automated by increasingly smart machines. One estimate suggests that countries such as the U.S. would see almost half of today’s jobs disappearing, while another estimate suggests that this might be just about one in ten jobs. But less is known about who will lose their jobs due to these transitions. And more critically, what might happen to the bottom 40 percent of the population of emerging countries that have only recently been exposed to basic digital technologies? Will they gain from technological progress, or will they face the negative effects of both exclusion and of others—countries or the better off—pulling ahead?

How to design youth employment programs

David Robalino's picture
For youth employment programs to be succesful, they need to offer multiple services ranging from counselling and training to job search assistance and stipends.  Photo: World Bank

After three and half years of work, we have finally completed our systematic review of youth employment programs. Many thanks to the co-authors who did the heavy lifting (Jose Manuel Romero, Jonathan Stöterau, Felix Weidenkaff and Marc Witte). The paper was presented at our recent Jobs and Development Conference. The team went over 40,000 papers to eventually find 103 that reported on credible impact evaluations of youth employment programs.

How do we measure jobs?

Sonia Madhvani's picture
Jobs and Development Conference: Interview with Alvaro Gonzalez

Jobs are key to ending poverty and development practitioners, policymakers, academics, and business leaders agree that measuring jobs is important. While data on the number of jobs being created is important, it only tells a small part of the story.

South Asia: The link between location, quality, and growth in job creation

Sonia Madhvani's picture
Jobs and Development Conference: Interview with Martin Rama

Jobs drive development. They are the surest pathway out of poverty and are crucial for inclusive growth. South Asia is the world’s fastest growing region; however, this progress has not always translated to jobs that are inclusive and productive.

Government and jobs: a new consensus

David Robalino's picture
Targeted regional and sectoral policies can be game changers in job creation.  Photo: Network on Jobs and Development

We recently hosted our first Jobs and Development Conference, and one of the key topics we discussed was the role of governments in creating jobs. We had about 260 participants, and 68 papers were presented (more than 150 considered but not selected for presentation, a high rejection rate that attests to the quality of the papers that were presented).

One of the plenary sessions that I chaired focused on the role of governments in designing and implementing jobs strategies. The consensus has been that jobs will come if countries just fix markets and institutions to promote investment and economic growth. But this is a very simplistic view.

Can urban slums help people work their way out of poverty?

Ivan Turok's picture
Ivan Turok, guest blogger, is Executive Director at the Human Sciences Research Council in South Africa, Editor-in-Chief of the journal ‘Regional Studies’, Honorary Professor at the University of Glasgow, and Chairman of the City Planning Commission for Durban
The interactions between three phenomena - place, people and economy - are bound to exercise a decisive influence on whether informal settlements help or hinder human progress. Photo: Scott Wallace/ World Bank

About one in three urban residents (over 900 million people) in developing markets live in informal settlements. Do these slums help lift people out of poverty by providing affordable entry points to access urban assets, services and livelihoods? Or do they confine people to enduring hardship and vulnerability in squalid and unsafe environments with little prospect of upward mobility?

Digitization is unlikely to destroy jobs, but may increase inequalities

Melanie Arntz's picture
The authors, guest bloggers, work in the Labour Markets, Human Resources and Social Policy Research Department at the Mannheim Centre for European Economic Research (ZEW).
The estimated share of ‘jobs at risk’ must not be equated with actual or expected employment losses from technological advances. Photo: Dominic Chavez / World Bank.

In recent years, there has been a revival of public concerns that automation and digitization might result in a jobless future. This debate has been particularly fueled by Carl Benedikt Frey and Michael A. Osborne, who argue that 47% of jobs in the US are ‘at risk of computerization.' 

These alarming figures spurred a series of studies that find similarly high shares of workers at risk of automation for other European countries. By focusing on the level of occupations, these studies typically neglect the fact that occupations involve bundles of tasks, many of which are hard to automate. As a result, these studies potentially overestimate the share of workers at risk of automation.

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