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June 2014

Labor Regulations Must Account for Both Jobs and Welfare

Carmen Pagés's picture

Why do labor regulations matter and should they protect workers or jobs, especially in developing countries? Carmen Pagés — Chief of the Labor Markets and Social Security Unit at the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) — tells the JKP that labor regulations matter for jobs and productivity, including which types of jobs get created (formal or informal) and in which sectors.

Avoiding the Extremes in Labor Regulations

Gordon Betcherman's picture

As governments debate labor market regulations — a highly controversial topic, sometimes for ideological reasons — it is vital to base decisions on empirical evidence. Thus, a welcome addition to the debate is the work of Gordon Betcherman — a Professor in the School of International Development and Global Studies, University of Ottawa — who contends that the key challenge for policy makers is to avoid the extremes of over- and under-regulation.

Getting Labor Market Regulations Right

David Robalino's picture

A construction worker finishes sealing glass, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Photo credit: Flickr @World Bank Photo Collection

Labor regulations are important to protect workers and create good jobs, though many critics contend that such policies undercut job creation. The best ways design and implement them may remain a source of debate, but research in the World Bank's 2013 World Development Report on Jobs shows that these regulations don't have much impact on employment, and can even prevent worker abuse and inadequate working conditions.

Tapping Aging Brains for the Common Good

Robert Willis's picture

Rapid population aging in many parts of the world means that policy makers and business communities will need to create conditions that enable aging workers to maximize productivity and adapt to changing technologies. We recently spoke with Robert Willis — Professor of Economics at the University of Michigan and Research Professor at the Population Studies Center — who has been conducting path-breaking research on the relationship between declining cognitive ability and work and retirement decisions.