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April 2015

If Sri Lanka is to join the knowledge economy, it needs to improve its education, training and skills

Nisha Arunatilake's picture
With innovation taking a central role in driving markets, countries are increasingly looking to invest in innovation and technological change to be competitive and improve productivity. Innovation is driven by talent and creativity. But the demand for highly skilled workers, especially workers in the science and technology fields are increasing globally.

College education still makes a huge difference for Chinese workers

Hongbin Li's picture
A recent study undertaken by Professor Hongbin Li of Tsinghua University, has looked at the rates of return from a college education in China. On all levels, having a college degree pays off, even with the recent sharp increase in the number of graduates. Moreover, the returns that accrue from going to the very best colleges are exponentially larger than those gained by graduating from a middling or low ranked college. Over a lifetime of employment, this adds up to a huge difference in total earnings.

Stress-testing social insurance systems to assess vulnerability

Jekaterina Navicke's picture
I would like to present an innovative way of seeing how the welfare state can mitigate wide-spread socio-economic risks and measure individual vulnerability to poverty. This will help address the issue of whether we are living in a society of risk and anxiety or whether the welfare state, with its social protection system, can mitigate these risks and safeguard people from falling into poverty. Stress testing welfare systems by modelling actual or hypothetical shocks to income can help assess individual vulnerability to poverty while helping to reduce the overall risks to society.
 
 

Can Mozambique use its booming energy sector to create jobs?

Channing Arndt's picture
Despite a decade of strong economic growth, the rate of formal sector job creation in Mozambique has been weak. But what impact will the recent large investments in the country’s oil and gas sector have on the employment outlook? Channing Arndt from UNU-Wider argues that there will not be many direct jobs created as a result of this boom, especially past the first investment phase. But there is a great opportunity for jobs to be created in ancillary services and support sectors, as well as those benefitting from the overall improvement in the country’s infrastructure.

Behavioral economics, jobs and development – an interview with Dan Ariely (part 2)

Dan Ariely's picture
How can the study of behavioral economics and psychology help us generate more, better and inclusive jobs? In this two part interview, Professor Dan Ariely of Duke University outlines how we can use insights from behavioral economics to make a positive impact. He describes how to make job hunting less demoralizing and how to improve the prospects for those already in work. He also looks at the ways in which the World Bank can operationalize the findings of last year’s World Development Report. Finally, he reveals the fascinating results of a study conducted alongside the Jobs CCSA in Kenya, aimed at encouraging saving in the informal sector.
 

Behavioral economics, jobs and development – an interview with Dan Ariely (part 1)

Dan Ariely's picture
How can the study of behavioral economics and psychology help us generate more, better and inclusive jobs? In this two part interview, Professor Dan Ariely of Duke University outlines how we can use insights from behavioral economics to make a positive impact. He describes how to make job hunting less demoralizing and how to improve the prospects for those already in work. He also looks at the ways in which the World Bank can operationalize the findings of last year’s World Development Report. Finally, he reveals the fascinating results of a study conducted alongside the Jobs CCSA in Kenya, aimed at encouraging saving in the informal sector.