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March 2016

Does formal work pay?

Michael Weber's picture
The disincentives to accepting a formal job often outweigh the incentives. Our research shows a positive correlation between measures of disincentives for formal work and the incidence of being informal. The formalization tax rate and the marginal effective tax rate are useful measures. The higher these measures are, the more likely workers - especially low-wage workers - will be informal. Policymakers need measures that help them understand the disincentives associated with formal work if they are to design policies that encourage formalization.
 

A knowledge economy needs preprimary soft skills development

Ali Mehdi's picture
Indian policymakers are concerned with the employability of their working-age populations. Technical and vocational education and training (TVET) might enhance the employability prospects of the present and near-term labor force. However, if we wish to become a knowledge economy, with highly skilled and dynamic rather than an abundant, cheap labor force, we should revamp our inefficient and inequitable early health and education systems.
 
 

Young Women and Work: International Women's Day

Nicole Goldin's picture
 
A young women at work in Sri Lanka. Women are more likely to work in vulnerable employment, with as many as 85% percent of young women working in vulnerable employment across Sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia and the Middle East and North Africa. Photo: Lakshman Nadaraja / World Bank


Economic growth not enough for jobs in Ghana

William Baah-Boateng's picture
Ghana’s economy has grown consistently over the past three decades, however, inadequate job creation, the depth of poverty, and widening income inequality, remain major challenges. The inability of Ghana’s growth to deal with these challenges is an indication of the urgent need to rethink of Ghana’s growth strategy.