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East Asia and Pacific

What LinkedIn data can tell us about tackling youth unemployment

Namita Datta's picture
Youth employment programs should place more emphasis on mentoring youth on how to self-assess their existing skills - including soft skills - and how to better signal these skills to employers. (Photo: Grant Ellis / World Bank Group)


Finding a good job is increasingly difficult – especially for young people. Globally, young people are up to four times more likely to be unemployed than adults.  Furthermore, the lack of opportunity can have devastating consequences for their long-term employment outcomes. Youth often lack the skills and competencies that are in high demand from employers, but they also face information gaps about which relevant skills they should signal to prospective employers.
 
To better understand youth and skills trends in emerging markets, the Solutions for Youth Employment (S4YE) Coalition embarked on a research collaboration with LinkedIn to analyze demand and supply side data from 390,000 entry-level job postings and 6.4 million LinkedIn profiles of young people (aged 21-29) in four diverse middle-income countries. Using big data analytics, the recently released report The Skills Gap or Signaling Gap: Insights from LinkedIn in emerging markets of Brazil, India, Indonesia, and South Africa brings the following three insights on what skills employers in those countries are looking for in youth hires.

Four policy approaches to support job creation through Global Value Chains

Ruchira Kumar's picture
 Maria Fleischmann / World Bank

Mexico created over 60,000 jobs between 1993 to 2000 upgrading the apparel value chain from assembly to direct distribution to customers.  (Photo: Maria Fleischmann / World Bank)

As we discussed in our previous post, Global Value Chains can lead to the creation of more, inclusive and better jobs. GVCs can be a win-win for firms that create better jobs while they enjoy greater efficiency, productivity, and profits. However, there is a potential trade-off between increasing competitiveness and job creation, and the exact nature of positive labor market outcomes depends on several parameters. Given the cross-border (and, therefore, multiple jurisdictive) nature of GVCs, national policy choices to strengthen positive labor outcomes are limited. However, national governments can make policy decisions to facilitate GVC participation that is commensurate with positive labor market outcomes.

Looking at the impact of changes to Chinese labor laws

Albert Park's picture
There have been many concerns about recent changes to Chinese labor laws, aimed at increasing the formality of employment and improving the funding of social insurance programs. A recent set of studies by the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology has looked at the impacts of those changes. Both employers and employees report that the new rules are being enforced and that the cost of employment has gone up. But this has not added to the overall level of unemployment, due to the strong growth rate in the economy generally.


 

College education still makes a huge difference for Chinese workers

Hongbin Li's picture
A recent study undertaken by Professor Hongbin Li of Tsinghua University, has looked at the rates of return from a college education in China. On all levels, having a college degree pays off, even with the recent sharp increase in the number of graduates. Moreover, the returns that accrue from going to the very best colleges are exponentially larger than those gained by graduating from a middling or low ranked college. Over a lifetime of employment, this adds up to a huge difference in total earnings.

Demystifying the Impact of Minimum Wages

Jobs Group's picture

In recent years, the minimum wage has become an increasingly popular for reducing inequality in many emerging markets, while others are still weighing whether to adopt one. But a lot of confusion still surrounds the impact of minimum wages in advanced economies, let alone in the emerging markets. In this blog, we speak with two experts on the topic: David Neumark (Professor of Economics, University of California, Irvine) and John T. Addison (Professor of Economic Theory, University of South Carolina). They both point to some job loss, especially for skilled workers, in advanced economies.

Singapore Clarke Quay Elgin Bridge underpass 2013 (by RSCLS street art collective). Photo: Flickr/66944824@N05 (Denis Bocquet)

日本経済の活性化に、人材を目覚めさせる (Shaking Up Japan’s Workforce to Reinvigorate)

Yoko Ishikura's picture

Japanese office workers. Photo credit: iStock 02-27-13 © kobbydagan

人口減少と高齢化が進む中で、長年の経済停滞から脱出するには、革新的な人材を必要とする。そこにおいて、日本が「これまでのやり方」を踏襲する余裕はもはやない。その理由は

Click here to read the English version.

Shaking Up Japan’s Workforce to Reinvigorate

Yoko Ishikura's picture

 Japanese office workers. Photo credit: iStock 02-27-13 © kobbydagan

As Japan searches for ways to cope with a shrinking and aging workforce — along with the need for a more innovative workforce to help pull it out of decades of stagnation — it is becoming increasingly clear that business as usual is no longer an option for several reasons.

Click here to read the Japanese version.

Escaping Poverty Through Work in East Asia

Trang Nguyen's picture

 Vietnam workers processing fish. Photo credit: Flickr @World Bank - East Asia and Pacific (https://www.flickr.com/photos/worldbank_eastasiapacific/)

Over the past 5 to 10 years, many East Asian countries, not just China, continued to reduce poverty despite an economic growth slowdown surrounding the 2008-2009 global financial crisis. Which factor played the biggest role in the further progress against poverty? Our research suggest that access to work and better earnings are an essential component of poverty reduction.

A Snapshot of How States Learn: India versus China

Luke Jordan's picture

Could the source of the wealth of nations be learning to learn? A recent paper by Luke Jordan, who until late 2013 was a Private Sector Development Specialist for the World Bank, along with Sébastien Turban of Caltech and Laurence Wilse-Samon of Columbia University, contends that the answer is yes.

Why the Philippines Failed to Create Enough – and Good — Jobs

Trang Nguyen's picture

 TomFullum.

The Philippines is not the typical East Asian miracle story. While the region's share of population living in extreme poverty (on less than US$1.25 a day) has declined by 75 percent since 1990, the speed of poverty reduction in the Philippines over this period was the slowest in East Asia. Similarly, the Philippines has experienced slower per capita growth — averaging 1.5 percent between 1960 and 2012, well below the 5.6 percent that East Asia has enjoyed. Moreover, the jobs picture is quite bleak, with 75 percent of employment in the informal sector. So what's wrong with the Philippines?

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