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Conflict

Ushering in a new era for jobs and economic transformation through IDA18

Thomas Farole's picture
With IDA18, new approaches to operations, new financial instruments, as well as new analytics and tools will help ensure we deliver on the jobs agenda. Photo: © John Hogg/World Bank

On December 14th and 15th donor and borrower country representatives of the World Bank Group will meet in Yogyakarta, Indonesia to finalize details for the 18th replenishment of IDA. The final agreement on IDA18 is expected to usher in a new era for IDA, the Bank’s fund for the poorest, dramatically increasing the level of financing and the potential for impact on development for the world’s poorest countries.
 
Central to the discussions on IDA over the past year has been the issue of jobs – how to deliver more jobs to meet the demands of a growing youth population; how best to improve job quality, particularly for the vast majority of workers in IDA countries who struggle in subsistence-level self-employment and other forms of informal employment; and how to make jobs more inclusive to women, youth, and populations in remote and lagging regions.

Jobs and conflict: solutions from Andhra Pradesh

Sanjay Pulipaka's picture

Counter insurgency operations have a development component. The states of Telangana and Andhra Pradesh in India have adopted a three pronged strategy to create jobs. These have helped sharply reduce the incidences of Naxalite extremism in their territories. A mix of policies aimed at grass roots employment, infrastructure investment and private sector support have paved the way for a sharp reduction in the fighting. 

Job Creation in Fragile States - Lessons from Yemen

Abdullah Al-Dailami's picture

As part of our discussion on creating jobs and expanding social protection in post-conflict and fragile states, we focus in on the Middle East — specifically Yemen. As is the case in sub-Saharan Africa, fragile states must contend with high youth unemployment, scarce formal sector jobs, weak institutions, and a lack of social protection, on top of the loss of lives, assets, education, and disruption from the conflict itself. The JKP recently spoke with Abdullah Al-Dailami, Acting Managing Director of the Social Fund for Development (SFD),  who says that a major emphasis now is providing access to financial and non-financial services to help people engage in self-employment.

Job Creation in Fragile States — Lessons from Liberia and the DRC

Mary Hallward-Driemeier's picture

Governments around the world may struggle to expand job creation, but the need — and challenge — is all the greater in post-conflict and fragile states, which all too often feature high youth unemployment, few formal sector jobs, and weak institutions, on top of the loss of lives, assets, education, and disruption from the conflict itself. The JKP gained further insight into these issues from recent conversations with policymakers from Liberia and the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). Gabriel Fernandez of Liberia stressed the importance of fiscal discipline.

Women and Jobs in Afghanistan

Sima Samar's picture

Women in Afghanistan continue to constitute a very small part of the official labor force. We asked Sima Samar, Chairperson of the Afghanistan Independent Human Rights Commission, what could be done to give women greater economic opportunities. She stressed the importance of empowering women for themselves, their families, and society, and the role of education in changing attitudes.

The Job Challenge in Post-Conflict and Fragile States

Paul Collier's picture

For post-conflict and fragile states, there is an acute need for generating and sustaining gainful and productive employment to help economies rebuild. Paul Collier a Professor of Economics at Oxford University, specializes in governance in low-income countries including the economics of civil war. We asked his thoughts on job creation in post-conflict and fragile states, which sectors hold the most promise, and where the bottlenecks lie.