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How to guarantee water access to reduce inequality in Central America

Seynabou Sakho's picture
Also available in: Español

Four years ago, Juan Angel Sandoval, a resident of Barrio Buenos Aires in the Honduran municipality of Siguatepeque, received water at home only three times a week. His was not an isolated reality. Most of his neighbors, were in the same situation. "It was annoying because the water was not enough," says Juan Angel.

As Peru’s agricultural production grows, smallholders long for better markets

David Dudenhoefer's picture
Also available in: Español
 CIP
Native potato varieties that were only consumed in the Andes are now served in Lima's best restaurants and exported as potato chips. Photo: CIP
Peruvian Agriculture has experienced impressive growth over the past two decades, which has contributed to the steady decline in the number of Peruvians living in poverty, yet millions of the country’s smallholders have missed out on that prosperity. A new book on Peru’s agricultural sector offers examples of more equitable approaches to agricultural development, to tap the sector’s full potential for alleviating poverty.

Social and economic inclusion of women is key for the development of Central America

Seynabou Sakho's picture
Also available in: Español

A couple of months ago, during one of my first visits to Central America as the World Bank Country Director, I had the opportunity of hearing the testimony of a young student from the municipality of San Dionisio, in the department of Matagalpa, Nicaragua. She said a small phrase with huge implications: "You know? In school I do not only learn, but here I feel part of a community.”

Without empowered women, there is no future for rural areas

Francisco Obreque's picture
Also available in: Español
A beneficiary family from the commmunity of San José del Paredón (in Chuquisaca, Bolivia) celebrates the new irrigation system.
A beneficiary family from the commmunity of San José del Paredón in Bolivia celebrates the new irrigation system. Photo: Gabriela Orozco / World Bank. 

“When the company let us down, we only imposed a fine. We must be firm with companies and with vendors, otherwise they fail to fulfill their end. This is how to move the project forward”. This testimony impressed me a lot when I heard it from an indigenous woman in Bolivia, who was proud to be part of the steering committee and defend the interests of the community in the project.

 
Bolivia has a terrific success story to tell about encouraging rural women to take the lead in their communities and organizations and lift themselves and their families out of poverty.

Private and Public Sectors partner to lead the way on Argentina´s roads

Verónica Raffo's picture
Also available in: Español

The world is watching Argentina these days.  As the leader of the G20 meetings this year, with visits from countless numbers of VIPs from around the world, Argentina is regaining the role of a regional leader. While expectations fly high for the country’s future potential, one essential input is lagging behind: the necessary infrastructure to facilitate investment and future growth. 



 

How to prepare a country to respond to a disaster

Diana Rubiano's picture
Also available in: Español
Ecuador is paying more and more attention to data collection and disaster risk management across sectors​.
 Paul Salazar.
The Cruz-Castro Family searching for their belongings after the 2016 earthquake in Pedernales, Ecuador. Photo: Paul Salazar / World Bank.
Disasters occur worldwide and are part of everyone’s life. Ever since they were first recorded, floods, hurricanes and earthquakes have marked the history of humanity and its evolution. Today, our efforts focus on preparing for and responding to the impacts of these events. This way we can reduce material damages and human suffering.

Disaster risk management is a priority for many countries in the Latin America and the Caribbean region.

How can electricity subsidies help combat poverty in Central America?

Liliana Sousa's picture
Also available in: Español


By Liliana D. Sousa


It might be surprising, but the majority of Central American households receive electricity subsidies, benefiting up to 8 out of 10 households in some cases. Without a doubt, this provides many poor and low-income families with access to affordable electricity.

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