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No Women, No Growth – The Case for Increasing Women’s Leadership in Latin America

Paula Tavares's picture
Also available in: Español
Latin America is up against a momentous year on multiple fronts. On one hand, game-changing national elections in six countries, including three of its largest – Brazil, Mexico and Colombia – are poised to reshape the political scenario in the region. In parallel, the economic agenda is front and center of countries’ efforts to overcome imbalances, implement reforms and accelerate growth.

For the recognition of equality in the exercise of the rights of all

Sofía Guerrero Gámez's picture
Also available in: Español

At present, more than 70 countries in the world criminalize homosexuality and condemn with imprisonment sexual acts between people of the same sex. What solutions can be provided to solve these problems?

Dominica’s path to resilient recovery after Hurricane Maria

Keren Charles's picture


Located in the warm waters of the Eastern Caribbean, Dominica is no stranger to tropical storms and hurricanes.  Yet Hurricane Maria, which battered Dominica last September, was unlike anything the island nation had ever seen. Packing winds of over 160 miles per hour, the Category 5 hurricane claimed the lives of 30 people and caused total damages and losses exceeding US$1.3 billion.

The challenges of bringing development to the remote areas of Colombia

Erwin de Nys's picture
Also available in: Español


In 2017-18 we visited the Meta department in Colombia on multiple occasions. Located right where Colombia’s Llanos Orientales (Eastern Plains) disappear south into the vastness of the Amazon rainforest, this area of the size of Belgium, the Netherlands, and Luxembourg combined is a magical spot in the world’s second most biodiverse country.
 
Meta is not a poor region - it boasts some of the nation’s largest oil reserves. Highly fertile soil and multiple thermal floors have created a boom in agribusiness in recent years, while its geographic proximity to Colombia’s capital has more recently led to a thriving tourism industry.
 
Despite having made significant progress on many fronts, this region still faces critical challenges. On our last visit, we had the opportunity to chat for hours with several small-scale farmers from south-western Meta – a sub-region where economic development has been seriously damaged by the cultivation of coca leaf, the raw material used to produce cocaine.
 

Are Caribbean hydromet services ready for the upcoming hurricane season?

Melanie Kappes's picture

View of a hurricane/ Photo: iStock


Co-authors: Michael Fedak, Guillermo Donoso, Curtis BarrettKeren Charles and Kerri Whittington Cox  

“June; too soon. July; standby. August; come it must. September; remember. October; all over”. This Caribbean nursery rhyme warns of the impending hurricane season and lets families know that it is time to start preparing for potential disasters.
 
But are hydrometeorological (“hydromet”) services adequately prepared?

What it takes for subnational PPPs in Brazil

Grégoire Gauthier's picture
Also available in: Portuguese
 

Brazil was one of the top five investment foreign and domestic private flows destinations for 2017. Nonetheless, foreign flows towards the country through Public Private Partnerships (PPPs) and concessions have sharply declined, from US$59.2 billion in 2012 to US$7.3 billion in 2017, according to World Bank latest  PPI Annual report.

What to do to regain the levels of 2012?

Why are energy subsidy reforms so unpopular?

Guillermo Beylis's picture

It is well established in the economic literature that it’s the rich who benefit from the lion’s share of energy subsidies. Yet, it is often the poor and vulnerable who protest loudly against these reforms. Why does this happen? What are we missing?

Can temporary employment help reduce crime?

Fabrizio Zarcone's picture
Also available in: Español

Activities of the Temporary Income Support Program, or PATI / World Bank

With collaboration of Emma Monsalve.

The 2008-09 financial crisis significantly affected El Salvador. The economy, as measured by gross domestic product, contracted 3.1 percent in 2009. The crisis seriously affected employment: between 2008 and 2009, more than 100,000 Salvadorans, or 3 percent of the labor force, became unemployed or under-employed.

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