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Haiti

Resilient Haitian cities – live today but think about tomorrow!

Sameh Wahba's picture


Landing in Port-au-Prince awakens your senses. Exiting the airplane, you are re-energized by the explosion of colors, the welcoming smiles, and the warm weather – particularly when coming from a cold January in Washington, D.C.  Loud honking, a high density of houses and buildings, and streets bustling with pedestrians and small informal businesses are all evidence of the rapid urbanization process in Haiti.
As soon as you land, the challenges of the city are evident; Port-au-Prince expands to the ocean on flat plains exposed to flooding and quickly rises on steep hills with challenging access and risks of landslides and flash floods.  The reconstruction efforts after the earthquake in 2010 are still ongoing, and many of the houses seem to be hanging from the sky, perched on steep slopes. If you look at the houses from afar they appear as a single skyscraper, as distance makes the houses seem as if they are built on top of the one another. These false skyscrapers are highly exposed to landslides, flooding and earthquakes.

100 Days After Matthew, Seven Years After the ‘Quake’: Is Haiti More Resilient?

Mary Stokes's picture
Also available in: Français | Español

The world’s third most affected country in terms of climatic events, Haiti seeks to better manage natural hazards to improve resilience


Haiti is highly vulnerable to natural hazards. Situated within the north Atlantic hurricane belt, andsat on top of the boundary between the Caribbean and North American plates, the risks are constant. However, this does not mean that disasters are inevitable.

100 jours après Matthieu, sept ans après le tremblement de terre : Haïti est-elle plus résiliente?

Mary Stokes's picture
Also available in: English | Español

Troisième pays au monde le plus touché en termes d’événements climatiques, Haïti cherche à mieuxgérer les risques naturels pour améliorer la résilience


Haïti est très vulnérable aux risques naturels. Situé dans la ceinture de l'ouragan de l'Atlantique Nord, etjuste au-dessus de la frontière entre les plaques des Caraïbes et de l'Amérique du Nord, les risques sont permanents. Toutefois, cela ne signifie pas que les catastrophes sont inévitables.

Rencontre avec des Haïtiens qui aident leur pays à se reconstruire après l’ouragan Matthew

Mary Stokes's picture
Also available in: English | Español

Nous avons visité la région la plus touchée pour voir comment les communautés se rétablissent après le passage de l’ouragan Matthew le 4 octobre 2016.

Deux mois après que l'ouragan ait dévasté les départements du sud d'Haïti, des efforts de reconstruction sont en cours. Dans certaines régions, des panneaux d’acier ondulés tout neufs scintillent sous le soleil, remplaçant les toits emportés par l'ouragan.

The farmers, engineers, and health workers helping rebuild Haiti after Matthew

Mary Stokes's picture
Also available in: Español | Français
We visited the most affected region to see how communities are recovering after the storm on October 4th, 2016.

Two months after Hurricane Matthew devastated the southern provinces of Haiti, rebuilding efforts are underway. In some areas, shiny new corrugated steel panels glimmer under the sun where the hurricane stripped away roofs.

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