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Latin America & Caribbean

Bridging the Gap in LAC Infrastructure

Karin Erika Kemper's picture
Also available in: Español


The other day I had the opportunity to participate in the annual CAF conference on Infrastructure, this time held in Mexico City. The conference featured CAF's new IDEAL report on the state of infrastructure in Latin America and the conference, attended by many decision and opinion makers from across LAC, was organized around findings of the report.
 
I had a few takeaways from the discussions, notably that (1) there is convergence on a range of key issues and (2) there are some important Bank messages that are unique:

Are you serious about youth violence?

Camilla Gandini's picture


Watch the video on c-span.org.

When my colleague kindly invited me to participate in the National Forum on Youth Violence Prevention, my first impression was that we were talking about something beyond a usual summit. And this impression was confirmed once I was there.

Oil is Well that Ends Well

Francisco G. Carneiro's picture
Also available in: Español


Why are petroleum prices dropping so fast anyway? Have they reached rock bottom yet? Should we be worried if they continue to fall? These are questions that probably every finance minister in either oil-rich or oil importing nations is trying to answer.  

Argentina’s challenge: getting rich before getting old

Ignacio Apella's picture
Also available in: Español



Probably, Mafalda - an Argentinean comic book character - was right when she said that "the urgent things do not leave time for the important things". However, it is necessary that, in this context, we must stop and think what should be done and what is important.

Argentina is going through a demographic transition process, which implies opportunities and challenges in economics and social fields. That is the actual case of Argentina, as well as the rest of Latin America.
 

Les leçons d’Haïti

Priscilla M. Phelps's picture
Also available in: English

Le séisme qui a dévasté Haïti en janvier 2010 a fait plusieurs milliers de morts et causé des dommages estimés à 7,8 milliards de dollars, dont plus de 3 milliards de dollars dans le secteur du logement.

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