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Benin

Congratulations to the First Recipients of the Certificate in Development Journalism

Haleh Bridi's picture
Also available in: Français

When I was based in the field, I often noticed that many of the journalists working in Africa had not been specifically trained to report on development-related matters, which at times hobbled their ability to effectively identify development issues and, by extension, inform the public of the choices and activities implemented in various countries.

So, we came up with the idea of helping journalists receive the best training we could give on the development challenges facing their continent, thus paving the way for “changing the narrative on Africa.”

The World Bank Africa Region introduced a successful, innovative approach to training journalists – a free, online course for 100 journalists from Francophone Africa, who were selected through an application process.

Climate-smart agriculture: Lessons from Africa, for the World

Ademola Braimoh's picture
Also available in: Français



The world’s climate is changing, and is projected to continue to do so for the foreseeable future.  The impact of climate change will be particularly felt in agriculture, as rising temperatures, changing rainfall patterns, and increased pests and diseases pose new and bigger risks to the global food system. Simply put, climate change will make food security and poverty reduction even more challenging in the future.

Benin: A competition to transform the country’s tourist sites into a laboratory for innovation

Claude Borna's picture
Also available in: Français



Benin possesses an enormous natural, historical, and cultural heritage. However, its potential has barely been explored. A study by the National Agency for the Promotion of Heritage and the Development of Tourism (ANPT) found that only 2 to 5 percent of Benin’s tourist potential has thus far been tapped.

Faced with the new human, environmental, and technological challenges of the twenty-first century, how can we think of and devise solutions that will rewrite the rules in the sector, which is undergoing rapid expansion in Africa?

Climate Impacts on African Fisheries: The Imperative to Understand and Act

Magda Lovei's picture
Also available in: Français



The impact of climate change on hydrology and other natural resources, and on many sectors of African economies—from agriculture to transport, to energy—has been widely researched and discussed. But its effect on marine fisheries, an important economic sector and significant source of food for large numbers of people in Africa, is less well understood.

First, what is known?

Climate change leads to rising sea temperatures, making fish stocks migrate toward colder waters away from equatorial latitudes, and contributing to shrinking fish sizes. It also influences the abundance, migratory patterns, and mortality rates of wild fish stocks.

In Benin, Can Resilient Investment Solutions Save a Battered Coast?

James Close's picture
Also available in: Français
Rapidly rising sea levels in Benin lend new meaning to castles built on sand. Photo: Jonathan Marks/FlickR


I was raised in a small town called Hornsea on England’s east coast, a magnificent place that attracts tourists but is eroding faster than the rest of Europe. Some of the impressive, clay cliffs are literally crumbling. Local roads and the old settlement and have fallen into the sea. More than once, forward-planning residents have demolished and rebuilt their houses from salvaged materials as their coast recedes.

Desertification is not Fate

Magda Lovei's picture
Also available in: Français

In East Africa and West Africa, about 300 million people living in dryland areas rely on natural, resource-based activities for their livelihood. By 2030, this number could increase to 540 million. At the same time, climate change could result in an expansion of Africa’s drylands by as much as 20%.

Keeping the Ocean at Bay: Combating Coastal Erosion with West Africa’s Sand River

Miguel Antonio Toquica Onzaga's picture
Also available in: Français
Image: Miguel Antonio Toquica Onzaga/ World Bank


Much of West Africa’s population lives along its coastline, where many of its capital cities are located. But though rising seawaters erode it, a study says the “sand river” they create can also protect it.

Finance numérique : quoi de neuf en Afrique de l’Ouest ?

Estelle Lahaye's picture
Cette page en : English
Photo: Philippe Lissac, 2011 CGAP Photo Contest


Même si la route reste encore longue, l'Union économique et monétaire ouest-africaine (UEMOA) a accompli des progrès intéressants en matière d’inclusion financière en développant ses services financiers numériques (SFN).