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Cote d'Ivoire

Climate Impacts on African Fisheries: The Imperative to Understand and Act

Magda Lovei's picture
Also available in: Français



The impact of climate change on hydrology and other natural resources, and on many sectors of African economies—from agriculture to transport, to energy—has been widely researched and discussed. But its effect on marine fisheries, an important economic sector and significant source of food for large numbers of people in Africa, is less well understood.

First, what is known?

Climate change leads to rising sea temperatures, making fish stocks migrate toward colder waters away from equatorial latitudes, and contributing to shrinking fish sizes. It also influences the abundance, migratory patterns, and mortality rates of wild fish stocks.

Women: The Hidden Figures Behind Côte d’Ivoire’s Economic Emergence

Jacques Morisset's picture
Also available in: Français



Politicians and economists often go to great lengths to scrutinize hundreds of pieces of data to identify complicated solutions, to the point of ignoring the obvious facts staring them right in the face! Although Côte d'Ivoire is devising complex strategies in a bid to achieve middle-economy status, it tends to overlook the role of women, who largely face deep inequalities that are difficult to ignore.

In Côte d’Ivoire Every Story Counts 10: Twenty-four hours to start a business in Côte d’Ivoire

Jacques Morisset's picture
Also available in: Français
The story of a country’s economic development is often told through the lens of new roads, factories, power lines, and ports. However, it can also be told through the voices of everyday heroes, individuals who have taken action to improve their lives and those around them.
 
CEPICI

Stéphanie Quoioh is very definite about it: she owes her steady rise in the entrepreneurial world to the Center for Investment Promotion in Côte d’Ivoire (CEPICI), which took her under its wing. A year ago, this young entrepreneur created her startup business, Archive Expert, in less than 24 hours, thanks to CEPICI, which enormously facilitated the task.
 

Keeping the Ocean at Bay: Combating Coastal Erosion with West Africa’s Sand River

Miguel Antonio Toquica Onzaga's picture
Also available in: Français
Image: Miguel Antonio Toquica Onzaga/ World Bank


Much of West Africa’s population lives along its coastline, where many of its capital cities are located. But though rising seawaters erode it, a study says the “sand river” they create can also protect it.

In Côte d’Ivoire Every Story Counts 9: In Elima, a New School Restores the Past

Taleb Ould Sid’Ahmed's picture
Also available in: Français



The story of a country’s economic development is often told through the lens of new roads, factories, power lines, and ports. However, it can also be told through the voices of everyday heroes, individuals who have taken action to improve their lives and those around them. In this blog series, the World Bank Group, in partnership with the Ivoirien newspaper Fraternité Matin and blogger Edith Brou, tells the stories of those individuals who, with a boost from a Bank project, have set economic development in motion in their communities.
 
Surrounded by dozens of other children from the village of Elima, little Karidjatou Ouattara sits calmly in class, eyes riveted to the blackboard.  She cannot contain her excitement: "Before, we had to go far to school; now, we have our own school!"

However, the Elima school, the first official French school, created in August 1887 and located on the eastern coast of the Aby Lagoon, opposite the town of Adiaké, has for a long time been largely symbolic in Côte d’Ivoire. Gradually falling into ruin, the school was ultimately abandoned and removed from the school map.

In Côte d’Ivoire, every story counts: When drinking water went scarce in Yakro

Jacques Morisset's picture
Also available in: Français



The story of a country’s economic development is often told through the lens of new roads, factories, power lines, and ports. However, it can also be told through the voices of everyday heroes, individuals who have taken action to improve their lives, and those around them. In this blog series, the World Bank Group, in partnership with the Ivorian newspaper Fraternité Matin and blogger Edith Brou, tells the stories of those individuals who, with a boost from a Bank project, have set economic development in motion in their communities.
 
Just a few months ago, the residents of the Dioulakro neighborhood located on the outskirts of Yamoussoukro (commonly referred to as Yakro by Ivorians) had to struggle every day to get drinking water. Ms. Bahlala still recalls the long hours that she spent in front of the neighborhood well to which people had flocked by daybreak. “I would be up by 4 am. Standing in line to collect water took up a large part of my daily routine, but it was a matter of survival for my family, and many others. I have painful memories of that time, because without water, there is no life.”

In Côte d’Ivoire, every story counts: New computerized personnel and wage management system has improved employee satisfaction and effectiveness in the civil service

Taleb Ould Sid’Ahmed's picture
Also available in: Français
New computerized personnel and wage management system has improved employee satisfaction and effectiveness in the civil service



The story of a country’s economic development is often told through the lens of new roads, factories, power lines, and ports. However, it can also be told through the voices of everyday heroes, individuals who have taken action to improve their lives, and those around them. In this blog series, the World Bank Group, in partnership with the Ivorian newspaper Fraternité Matin and blogger Edith Brou, tells the stories of those individuals who, with a boost from a Bank project, have set economic development in motion in their communities.

Jacques Dongo, Inspector of Guidance Services in the Ministry of National Education and Vocational Training, proudly exhibits his loan certificate, the key to making some of his dreams come true. As we chatted with him in front of a counter in the Ministry of the Civil Service and Modernization of the Administration, he acknowledged the benefits of the new integrated civil service personnel management system (SIGFAE): “Before this system was set up, it was a game of cat and mouse between the ‘margouillats,’ or notorious intermediaries, and government departments to obtain documents. The introduction of the new system has completely changed this. It has taken me just 3 days to obtain this document once I fulfilled all the requirements.”

In Côte d’Ivoire, every story counts 6: toward patient-centric hospitals

Jacques Morisset's picture
Also available in: Français
In Côte d’Ivoire, every story counts 6: toward patient-centric hospitals



The story of a country’s economic development is often told through the lens of new roads, factories, power plants, and ports. However, it can also be told through the voices of everyday heroes, individuals who have taken action to improve their lives and those around them. In this blog series, the World Bank Group, in partnership with Ivorian newspaper Fraternité Matin and blogger Edith Brou, tells the stories of those individuals who, with a boost from a Bank project, have set economic development in motion in their communities.

About Sofie immediately felt reassured on her arrival for treatment at the Bagba Health Center in southern Côte d’Ivoire: “As soon as you go through the door, the nurse’s aides put you at ease with a smile. In other places, you’re scared and you think twice before talking to the medical personnel, who are quick to belittle patients and walk away.”

Paris Léona, a community at the heart of development

Jacques Morisset's picture
Also available in: Français
© Dasan Bobo /World Bank


The story of a country’s economic development is often told through the lens of new roads, factories, power lines, and ports. However, it can also be told through the voices of every day heroes, individuals who have taken action to improve their lives and those around them. In this blog series, the World Bank Group, in partnership with the Ivorian newspaper Fraternité Matin and blogger Edith Brou, tells the stories of those individuals who, with a boost from a Bank project, have set economic development in motion in their communities.

“Preparing kabato used to be a grueling task,” explains Salimata Koné, a resident in the village of Paris Léona, located some 500 kilometers to the north west of Abidjan. The women in the village usually had to toil away with mortars and pestles to produce this corn meal that fed the entire family. This laborious activity ended when Salimata Koné and other women in the village participated in the budget discussions led by the village chief, providing them with the opportunity to acquire a mill in their community. Since then, life has been much easier.

In Côte d’Ivoire, every story counts: Bridging schools allow Ivorian children to make up for lost time

Taleb Ould Sid’Ahmed's picture
Also available in: Français


 

The story of a country’s economic development is often told through the lens of new roads, factories, power lines, and ports. However, it can also be told through the voices of every day heroes, individuals who have taken action to improve their lives and those around them. In this blog series, the World Bank Group, in partnership with the Ivorian newspaper Fraternité Matin and blogger Edith Brou, tells the stories of those individuals who, with a boost from a Bank project, have set economic development in motion in their communities.

Young Soulama Siaka is dressed in his khaki school uniform and is sitting quietly next to his uncle, Kone Birama, in the yard of their family home. The bare yard reflects the destitution of his family after the political crisis. “I couldn’t even afford to send my children to school,” he says. Children drop out of school nearly everywhere in Côte d’Ivoire because their families cannot afford the tuition fees.

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