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Senegal

Rapid results approach: A better way forward for public sector reform in Senegal?

Thomas Dickinson's picture
Also available in: Français



“I feel proud of myself, very proud,” said Rokhaya Niang as she worked. She and her team had had only 100 days to streamline and accelerate the administrative processing of land subdivision applications at the local Ministry of Urbanization office in Rufisque, a city 25 km east of the center of Dakar. The area has been developing quickly since it was chosen as the location of the new national government center, and their office had been swamped under a backlog of allotment and construction requests.

No pain, no gain: Witnessing ingrained obstacles to public sector reform in Senegal

Thomas Dickinson's picture
Also available in: Français



One of the great frustrations of top-down reform is that it rarely works out as planned.
In the 58 years since independence, Senegal has undertaken public administration reform 68 times—and on 14 occasions public administration quality was specifically targeted, according to a new study. On the donors’ side, the country saw 27 projects costing over $11 billion between 1998 and 2008 that included public sector institutional reform.

Climate Impacts on African Fisheries: The Imperative to Understand and Act

Magda Lovei's picture
Also available in: Français



The impact of climate change on hydrology and other natural resources, and on many sectors of African economies—from agriculture to transport, to energy—has been widely researched and discussed. But its effect on marine fisheries, an important economic sector and significant source of food for large numbers of people in Africa, is less well understood.

First, what is known?

Climate change leads to rising sea temperatures, making fish stocks migrate toward colder waters away from equatorial latitudes, and contributing to shrinking fish sizes. It also influences the abundance, migratory patterns, and mortality rates of wild fish stocks.

In Senegal, food security and women’s empowerment go hand in hand

Louise Cord's picture
Also available in: Français
© Dominic Chavez/World Bank


Senegal’s nutrition policy is at a crossroads. Reaching a critical moment where the effects of malnutrition could have a detrimental effect on generations of young Senegalese to come, the Government of Senegal is striving to make efforts to address the root problems of malnutrition. However, if these actions are taken without a conscious effort bolster the key role of women in nutrition, the country may not succeed in stymieing stunting and malnutrition in the country.

Making local voices count: How Senegal and Tunisia inspire each other on governance reform

Salim Rouhana's picture
Also available in: Français

Also available in: Español

Photo: Mo Ibrahim Foundation / Flickr Creative Commons

Six years ago, a revolution started in Tunisia with an unemployed young Tunisian in a secondary city desperate to make his voice heard. This revolution reshaped the country’s development agenda and triggered a decentralization process to give more say to local governments in policymaking. Since then, the World Bank’s work on local governance in Tunisia has expanded from equipping municipalities with basic services into tackling the diverse challenges of decentralization: institutional reform, participatory processes, transparency and accountability, capacity building, and performance assessment.

Are tablets the best way to increase digital literacy in African countries?

Edward Amartey-Tagoe's picture
Credit: Arne Hoel


A good number of African governments have shown how technologically-forward thinking they are by announcing one-tablet-per-child initiatives in their countries. President John recently announced that tablets for Ghana’s schoolchildren were at the center of his campaign to improve academic standards. Last year, President Kenyatta of Kenya abandoned a laptop project for tablets.

Finance numérique : quoi de neuf en Afrique de l’Ouest ?

Estelle Lahaye's picture
Cette page en : English
Photo: Philippe Lissac, 2011 CGAP Photo Contest


Même si la route reste encore longue, l'Union économique et monétaire ouest-africaine (UEMOA) a accompli des progrès intéressants en matière d’inclusion financière en développant ses services financiers numériques (SFN).

Improving the Odds of Being Formally Financially Included in Senegal

Siegfried Zottel's picture
Also available in: Français


While most adults in developed countries have an account at a bank or another formal financial institution, this is not the reality in many developing countries, including Senegal. A recent World Bank Group (WBG) Financial Capability Survey revealed that less than one in five Senegalese adults (17%) report owning an account at a formal institution, which includes banks, microfinance institutions, or e-money agents. While Senegal’s financial inclusion levels are similar to those in other lower-middle income economies, the country lags behind the average inclusion rate among Sub-Saharan African economies.

From Vocational Training to Employment in Senegal: Encouraging Youth to be the Engine of Growth

Mouhamadou Moustapha Lo's picture
Also available in: Français



Like many African countries, Senegal has a young population in search of decent jobs and salaries.  A report covering the last national census of the Senegalese population, published every ten years by l’Agence nationale de la statistique et de la démographie (ANSD) (National Statistics and Demographics Agency), reveals that the average age of the population is approximately 22 years and that one in every two Senegalese is under 18 years of age. Those under 15 years of age represent more than 42% of the population, clearly indicating the predominance of the youth demographic.  However, this segment of the population is most affected by under-employment and unemployment with young people representing 60% of job seekers.

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