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Africa

Africa Impact Evaluation Podcast: Community-Based Conditional Cash Transfers Make a Big Difference in Tanzania

David Evans's picture


Photo credit: Katrina Kosec.

Can a cash transfer program that relies heavily on communities to target beneficiaries, deliver payments, and monitor conditions, improve outcomes for the poor in the same way that more centrally-run conditional cash transfer programs (CCTs) have elsewhere?

The Angola paradox: Development aid in a "wealthy" country

Thomas Dickinson's picture
Also available in: Français

Preparing a recent project mission to Angola, I came across the country’s latest accomplishment: a gigantic new refinery to consolidate its national oil industry. Looking at that massive structure, I was hit with a sudden thought: if they can pull off such an enormous and complex feat of engineering, what do they need me for?

Climate Tech in Ethiopia? Yes!

Michael Ehst's picture
Also available in: Français

This week marks the launch of the new, World-Bank supported Ethiopia Climate Innovation Center (CIC). The center joins a global network of CICs and is designed to support local Ethiopian businesses that are responding to the challenges of climate change by providing mentorship, financing, access to markets, and policy support.

Better Disease Surveillance is part of the Great Lakes Peace Dividend

Kavita Watsa's picture
Also available in: Français

Beside the great Lake Kivu, beneath the shadow of an enormous volcano, the Rwanda-DRC border divides the neighboring cities of Gisenyi and Goma. As the day begins, the predominant impression is one of movement, as people walk in either direction through the customs checkpoint, carrying giant bunches of green banana, stacks of nesting plastic chairs, anything that is tradable. They form an unbroken stream of humanity crossing to and fro, the tall border signboards towering overhead.

Science and technology in higher education

Makhtar Diop's picture
Also available in: Français

Science and technology in higher education


On the sidelines of a high-level forum on Higher Education for Science, Technology and Innovation in Africa, the World Bank's Makhtar Diop, Vice President for its Africa Region, says we must increase the numbers of students in Africa graduating with degrees in science, technology and mathematics.

 

Where are the jobs for Africa’s youth?

Maleele Choongo's picture

I want to be... an entrepreneur
)

Over the next 10 years, Africa will have created about 122 million new jobs, says the World Bank Youth Employment in Sub-Saharan Africa Report. Although this is a very exciting forecast, mass job availability alone won’t be enough to address the unemployment issues in Africa, especially when the new jobs are not proportional to the influx of unemployed youth. Furthermore, the pace at which these jobs are being created falls short of the rate of youth entering the job market per year. During the next ten years that it takes for Africa to finally create the new jobs, eleven million youth will have been entering the labor market each year. 

Development: Made in Africa

Maleele Choongo's picture

From Slums to Cocktail Parties - African Jewelry is Trending

Sub-Saharan Africa is home to the world’s highest female entrepreneurial activity, according to the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor Women’s Report. Approximately 27% of African women are engaged in some form of entrepreneurial venture. Among these women is Kate Mahugu, cofounder of Shopsoko.com.

Minding the Gap: Gender Equality and Trade in Africa

Maleele Choongo's picture

Mind the Gap: Gender Equality and Trade in Africa (Trailer)

According to the World Bank report, "Women and Trade in Africa: Realizing the Potential", eliminating gender-specific barriers can help boost trade and increase productivity in Africa. Behind the research for this report were women who shared their personal stories of how they overcame gender discrimination at work in order to realize their potential.

Fighting poverty is the best response to climate change

Thomas Dickinson's picture
Also available in: Français

Mauritania, like its Sahelian neighbors, is struggling with three problems: drought, high food prices and security threats. All of these threats are driven in some form by global climate change to the point where they are threatening economic growth, stability and peace.

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