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Africa

Getting the Youth Voice Heard at Paris’s COP 21

Nelly Diane Alemfack's picture
Also available in: Français
According to Nelly Alemfack, center, "Young people across Africa must mobilize and band together to lobby their governments to do more," in the fight against climate change. 

The Earth’s temperatures are rising and it’s no secret. As an African, originally from Cameroon, I have personally witnessed the damaging effects and know that my continent and my people are significantly at risk if major steps are not taken to bring down the heat. While solutions and concrete actions exist to fight against climate change, they are only half the battle. The other half lies with the appropriation of these solutions by youth and future generations.

“If you don’t have a mobile phone as a farmer, sell a goat and get one”

James Wire's picture



It was such a pleasant sun filled morning when we descended upon Iganga town in Uganda in December. The farmers began trickling in one by one after 9 am, once they had tended to their crops and animals.

Why I care about climate change in Mozambique

Rafael Saute's picture
Some of the most productive areas along the lower Limpopo in Gaza Province


Whenever I drive along the EN1 North-South highway that cuts across Mozambique, I notice with satisfaction the long lines of local villagers in Gaza Province selling fruits and vegetables, processed cashew nuts, maize, manioc -- you name it -- in unequivocal and clear abundance.

Ready for takeoff: Connecting people for peace and development in Eastern DRC

Mohammed Dalil Essakali's picture
Also available in: Français
Aerial view of a refugee camp @Vincent Tremeau/World Bank
Aerial view of a refugee camp @Vincent Tremeau/World Bank

It would be hard to find another place on earth where the improvement of transportation is more impactful on the wellbeing of a population than in the eastern region of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). Here, transportation is so severely underdeveloped that travel to other provinces is sometimes nearly impossible, if not downright dangerous.

How much does the gender gap really cost?

Rachel Coleman's picture

A new report entitled, “The Cost of the Gender Gap in Agricultural Productivity in Malawi, Tanzania and Uganda” launched last week at a side-event of the Committee on World Food Security (CFS) 42nd session calling for policymakers to prioritize closing the gender gap in agricultural productivity in Africa.  This report was jointly produced by the World Bank Africa Gender Innovation Lab, UN women and UNDP-UNEP Poverty-Environment Initiative to quantify the cost and specify the gain in closing the gender gap in agriculture.

This launch was positioned on the UN’s International Day of Rural Women – a day dedicated to recognizing that empowering rural women is key to achieving sustainable development. In Sub-Saharan Africa the reality is women form a large proportion of the agricultural labor force, yet gender-based inequalities in access to and control of productive and financial resources inhibit them from achieving the same level of agricultural productivity as men.  

The Africa Gender Innovation Lab (GIL) has been working to generate evidence on how to close the gender gap in agricultural productivity through conducting rigorous impact evaluations. A 2014 GIL report entitled Levelling the Field identified areas to focus our attention in working to close the gap and offered promising policy solutions and emerging new ideas to test.   

The new report expands on  Levelling the Field, to illustrate why this gap matters, showing that closing the gap could result in gross gains to GDP of $100 million in Malawi, $105 million in Tanzania and $67 million in Uganda—along with other positive development outcomes such as reduced poverty, and greater food security.

Lessons from the Mbongui

Gessye Ginelle Safou-Mat's picture
Also available in: Français

Lessons from the Mbongui
I was about 13 years old when my family organized a trip to the village of Mpangou, in the Republic of the Congo. Travelling to the village was an event for us kids of the city – a new world. I remember packing our generators, cd players and speakers to bring a bit of our urban lives with us, and my mother telling us to buy candies and biscuits as gifts for the people. The road was full of potholes, and the men often had to push our cars forward through the mud, but at last, we got there.

Using climate smart agriculture to build farmers’ resilience in Senegal

Aifa Fatimata Niane Ndoye's picture
Also available in: Français
Mamadou Faye is a sorghum farmer in Pointe-Sarene, Senegal. Thanks to the West African Productivity Program, he was able to grow healthy stalks of sorghum despite erratic rainfall.
World Bank / Daniella Van Leggelo-Padilla

Pathway to profitable women-owned enterprises

Francesco Strobbe's picture

Pathway to profitable women-owned enterprises @ Evgeni Zotov / FlickR

Women entrepreneurs in Ethiopia are disadvantaged from the start. They have less access to the finance, networks, and education which help their male counterparts advance. They face regular discrimination and harassment from society--sometimes even from their own families and communities. The challenges a woman entrepreneur in Ethiopia faces in growing her business are overwhelming.

Development as Music: Using Africa’s Creative Wealth to Improve Lives across the Continent

Patrick Kabanda's picture
Also available in: Français
 Patrick Kabanda
Traditional dance is performed by young Swazi women at the Mantenga Nature Reserve in Swaziland. Photo: Patrick Kabanda


When I was a child I lived in two worlds. The first world was a creative one, filled with music, a teeming treasure of sounds that stretched from church to nature. It included thunderous organ chords, melodious tube fiddles, and raspy frog choruses, to name a few.  The other world I inhabited was more sober in nature, marked with political instability, hardships, and poverty. These two worlds came together in a loud cacophony that is my home country, Uganda.  

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