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Social Inclusion

Social inclusion: Let’s do things differently to end poverty!

Maninder Gill's picture



On October 17, 2017, End Poverty Day, 33 World Bank offices in Africa came together to talk about poverty and social inclusion. We were excited of course, but were totally unprepared for what we saw!  The 750 “in-person” participants in the field offices could not get enough of the discussion. Every country made brief but powerful, and highly inspiring, presentations on social inclusion. They highlighted the work of a host of actors—civil society organizations, local communities, faith-based organizations, youth groups, government agencies, and World Bank staff—to make a real difference in the lives of some of the most excluded people in Africa, such as people with albinism, orphans, street children, and women who experience gender-based violence (GBV).

Putting Ideas to practice: one stop in the journey of “Inclusion Matters”

Maitreyi Bordia Das's picture
As a concept, social inclusion can be taught. Photo: World bank

I am often asked—what happened as a result of the World Bank’s 2013 flagship report, Inclusion Matters? It made a big splash in the world of ideas but what did it do to improve people’s lives? This is not to say that ideas don’t affect the lives of people, but ideas need to percolate into practice. How do we know if a report has been relevant for development practice?

Inclusion Is Key to Shared Prosperity in Uganda

Inclusion Matters: The Foundation to Shared Prosperity in Uganda


As Uganda moves toward becoming a middle income country, policies focused on including all Ugandan's are becoming increasingly important. Maitreyi Bordia Das, lead author of the new report Inclusion Matters: The Foundation to Shared Prosperity, discusses why inclusion is critical, not only to reducing poverty or income inequality, but to improve the ability of previously disadvantaged people to take part in society.