Syndicate content

Environment

Desertification is not Fate

Magda Lovei's picture
Also available in: Français

In East Africa and West Africa, about 300 million people living in dryland areas rely on natural, resource-based activities for their livelihood. By 2030, this number could increase to 540 million. At the same time, climate change could result in an expansion of Africa’s drylands by as much as 20%.

Keeping the Ocean at Bay: Combating Coastal Erosion with West Africa’s Sand River

Miguel Antonio Toquica Onzaga's picture
Also available in: Français
Image: Miguel Antonio Toquica Onzaga/ World Bank


Much of West Africa’s population lives along its coastline, where many of its capital cities are located. But though rising seawaters erode it, a study says the “sand river” they create can also protect it.

In Malawi, planting trees in fields of maize bumps up yields

Magda Lovei's picture


During my recent trip to Malawi, I saw that the expansion of agriculture, of illegal logging, and of charcoal production are decimating the country’s once-forested hillsides, causing soil to wash into rivers, wetlands, and lakes. This loss of topsoil is reducing crop yields, putting stress on agriculture-dependent communities, and leading to increasingly intense land use.

How the real-time tracking of market prices in Somalia helps us respond to drought

Utz Pape's picture

Over half of the 12 million people living in Somalia are acutely food insecure. This adds to the development challenge for Somalia after more than two decades of civil war and political instability. In particular, the urgent need for humanitarian assistance bears the risk of fostering aid dependency. To embark on a sustainable pathway toward development instead, intervention should rely on markets (whenever possible), and react dynamically to changes in market equilibria.

Therefore, we started to monitor 14 Somali markets and publish the data in near real-time using something similar to what we use for South Sudan, the innovative survey and analysis methodologies.

West Africa’s charismatic marine life, or “aquatic bushmeat,” under threat

Peter Kristensen's picture
 A sea turtle rests on a rock in Guinea-Bissau. Photo credit: IBAP


In Ghana, coastal erosion and rising seas are burying some seaside villages, like Fuveme, which is now completely under sand.  As in neighboring countries, hydrocarbon exploration is well underway not too far from the shore, and coastal urban areas are expanding. The fish stock has declined dramatically, and formerly thriving fishing communities are in trouble.

Mozambique: Communities give hope for resilient and sustainable forests

Magda Lovei's picture
Coal production in Quirimbas National Park, Mozambique. Borgarello/World Bank


This is the third blog in a serieson forest livelihoods in Africa.

Every year on the International Day of Forests, we celebrate the vital role of forests―their contribution to the air we breathe, to healthy water cycles, to soil conservation, carbon sequestration, and the provision of habitats. We are also reminded about the urgent need to halt deforestation, which is accounting for about 18% of global greenhouse gas emissions.

A balancing act: Exploring how the Republic of Congo can use forest resources sustainably for development

Benoît Bosquet's picture
Also available in: Français


This is the second blog in a series on forest livelihoods in Africa.

When driving through Sangha and Likouala in the northern part of the Republic of Congo, you cannot help but marvel at the vastness of the tropical forest. The area, nearly the size of Greece, is part of the Congo Basin, one of the most important wilderness areas left on earth.

10 Knowledge Products from Sub-Saharan Africa You Don’t Want to Miss

Daniella Van Leggelo-Padilla's picture
Examine, evaluate, analyze, and explore… The World Bank Group’s comprehensive research, reports, and knowledge products do just that, providing policy makers and stakeholders from all sectors across Africa access to reliable evidenced-based data to assist in their decision-making processes.

Where will the footprints be when there is no more sand? Coastal erosion and the future of Senegal

Matthias Cinyabuguma's picture
Also available in: Français

Where will the footprints be when there is no more sand?  Coastal erosion and the future of Senegal

Rocky shores that hardly measure more than several meters at high tide are all that are left of some of Senegal’s most highly prized beaches at the seaside resort Saly. With every year that passes, the Atlantic ocean inches closer, much to the dismay of locals and tourists alike.
25% of the Senegalese coast is at high risk for coastal erosion, and it is estimated that this figure will increase to 75% by 2080 if sea levels continue to rise. A victim of climate change, Senegal tourism has taken a hit despite being one of the key focus areas of the Plan Sénégal Émergent, the country’s long-term growth and development strategy.

Pages