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Africa, Stand Up!

Maleele Choongo's picture

Earlier this year, the World Bank got a taste of what African youth can bring to the table. I was one of 30,000 Twitter users participating in the #iwant2work4africa campaign. For months, we voiced our passion for Africa while shoehorning our qualifications to work for the continent, all in 140 characters.

5 Ways to Join African Ministers at Annual Meetings

Maleele Choongo's picture

Life won’t stop for the World Bank and IMF Annual Meetings this week, but like the true development junkie you are, you are already calculating how quickly you have to eat breakfast to make it in time for #EmpowerWomen.

Luckily, your good friends at the Africa Region are just as determined to make sure you stay in the loop. We sense your angst and we’ve got you covered.

Helping Africa win better deals for its minerals

Makhtar Diop's picture
Also available in: Français

Helping Africa win better deals for its minerals © jbdodane
With oil in Niger and Uganda, natural gas in Mozambique and Tanzania, iron ore in Guinea and Sierra Leone―African countries are increasingly finding rich new deposits of oil, gas, or minerals and just as quickly, attracting the courtship of international companies that are drawn to Africa’s new bonanza in extractives wealth.

Preparing African youth for high-paying engineering jobs

Peter Materu's picture
Also available in: Français

Training Young Engineers to Transform Africa


At the 2013 Global Social Venture Competition held at Berkeley’s Haas School of Business, two African students, Moctar Dembele and Gérard Niyondiko, won the first prize for creating an anti-malarial soap bar. They tested and developed this product at the International Institute of Water and Environmental Engineering in Burkina Faso, a small country in West Africa.

Preventing Maternal Mortality - A Yardstick for Social Justice

Patricio V. Marquez's picture

I was glad to read the announcement made by World Bank President, Dr. Jim Kim, at the start of this year’s UN General Assembly meetings, about the Bank’s projected financing support through the end of 2015 to help developing countries reach the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) for women and children’s health.  As we move toward the culmination of the MDGs in 2015 and beyond, preventing maternal and child deaths should be seen by all government delegations and their partners in the international development community as a clear yardstick to measure their commitment for creating more just and inclusive societies.

Working With New Partners to Build Skills in Africa

Sajitha Bashir's picture

While global economic growth has been sluggish in recent years, Africa has been growing. We’ve seen a resurgence of traditional sectors such as agriculture and the extractive industries as well as promising new ones such as ICT. Not surprisingly, these booming sectors need highly skilled technicians, engineers, medical workers, agricultural scientists and researchers. Yet large numbers of African graduates remain unemployed as their skills are often not in line with industry requirements. 

What’s Happening in Africa?

Maleele Choongo's picture
A monthly round-up of World Bank events, reports, and launches in the Africa region.
 

What do actor Jeffery Wright, President Jim Y. Kim, and President Ernest Bai Koromo of Sierra Leone all have in common? Before this month, your guess would’ve been just as good as mine, but the three clued me in when they showed up to the same event to share a common interest:

A New Deal for Somalia

Makhtar Diop's picture
Also available in: Français


Getting Somalia right has huge regional and global implications and attracted $2.4 billion in support at a recent development partners meeting in Brussels. 

Supporting fragile and conflict-affected countries to get back on a stable, hopeful development path is a key priority for me as Vice President for the World Bank’s Africa region. It is on my mind especially at the moment after being in Brussels several days ago to participate in the EU-hosted New Deal Conference on Somalia, and then visiting Bamako to pledge our support to Mali’s newly formed Government. As stated by the international community and many observers, the recent election of President Ibrahim Boubacar Keita will open a new era of peace and reconstruction for Mali and we will be an active partner in this immense task.

The Brussels conference marks the anniversary of last year’s political transition and culminated in the endorsement of a “Compact” against which the international community pledged $2.4 billion through 2016. The conference, hosted by the EU and the Government of Somalia led by President Hassan Sheikh Mohamud, not only helped consolidate international political support for Somalia but also generated considerable momentum for the country’s development plans and a path to international debt relief.

World Bank Fellowships for Young Africans and Diasporans

Maleele Choongo's picture
Also available in: Français

World Bank Group Fellowship Program for Ph.D. Students of African Descent
The World Bank is launching its Africa Fellowship Program and offering 6-month fellowships to young Africans and African Diasporans currently enrolled in post-graduate programs on the continent. The Bank is calling for applications from interested students who are passionate about development in Africa and meet the following criteria:

  • Be African or of African descent
  • Be within one or two years of completing their Ph.D.
  • Be enrolled in an academic institution and returning to university after the program
  • Be below 32 years of age
  • Have an excellent command of English (both written and verbal)
  • Possess strong quantitative and analytical skills

Participation in the program may start at any time during the year. Fellows receive round-trip air travel to Washington, D.C. from their university, and remuneration during their fellowship. Throughout their Fellowship, students will be able to use their access to World Bank facilities, information and staff to enhance their doctoral research. After completing six months of the fellowship, high performers will be offered an additional six months to continue their work with the Bank.

Jobs: Can Uganda secure the future for its youth?

Rachel K. Sebudde's picture

When Mukisa joined the 62nd Makerere University graduating class in January 2012, he had already made up his mind to walk a very different path from those who graduated from the same Kampala university 30 years ago. Back then, jobs were waiting for graduates, who joined formal employment that afforded them a decent living. Today, only 20% of new entrants onto the Ugandan labor market find formal jobs, leaving the rest to self-employment and other informal activities. So Mukisa started a business in plant nurseries to tap into the demand for gardening materials for the booming construction industry in the city. He has gradually acquired the technical and entrepreneur skills for his business, but wishes for better access to capital and land, and less harassment by local authorities, to expand his business.

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