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#16Days of Activism Against Gender-Based Violence

Engaging men and boys in the prevention of violence against women in Uganda

Jennifer A. Wagman's picture
Male participants from SHARE group for preventing violence against women (Rakai, 2009)
 

Intimate partner violence (IPV) is the most common form of violence against women and girls worldwide. Globally, 30% of women over age 15 have experienced some form of IPV in their lives. As the main perpetrators of violence against women, men are also negatively affected by IPV. It is therefore critical that men and boys be involved in interventions that target IPV prevention. However, many IPV reduction programs have struggled in engaging men and boys. This comes despite the fact that numerous interventions have been designed and implemented to involve males in violence prevention activities. The SHARE Project offers one example. The SHARE intervention is the first behavioral approach to effectively reduce both IPV and HIV incidence.

Mental health and intimate partner violence in Kenya

Photo Credit: World Vision Kenya


Mental health has a crucial role in the prevention of sexual and gender-based violence. However, to date most research and practice has focused on the role of mental health post-violence, and intimate partner violence (IPV) prevention is relying on public health models that do not explicitly include mental health. Yet, key concepts, processes, and competencies in the mental health field appear essential to successful IPV primary prevention.