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Latin America & Caribbean

Introducing #LACfeaturegraph blog contest - A chance to voice your views on poverty & inequality

Oscar Calvo-González's picture
Also available in: Español | Français | Portuguese

Are you a student or a young professional passionate about development and data? Do you care about poverty and inequality in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC)? Then this blog contest is for you.

LACfeaturegraph Blog Contest

Regular readers of this space will know by now that we have run a periodic blog series - #LACfeaturegraph – that highlighted a particular data point from our LAC Equity Lab data portal and analyzed critical development issues across the region. Now this is your chance to be a part of this effort. You, too, can use the data from the LAC Equity Lab and come up with a blog entry that addresses some of these issues. Through the contest, we are looking for original, well-written posts whereby participants can share their perspective on poverty and equity issues in the LAC region and also recommend plausible public policy interventions.

The winner of this blog contest will get his or her entry published as part of the #LACfeaturegraph series. The winner will also have the opportunity to visit the World Bank Group headquarters in Washington D.C. at a later date to participate in a poverty event. Blog entries will be accepted for a month – from May 15, 2017 to June 15, 2017.

Chart: Globally, 70% of Freshwater is Used for Agriculture

Tariq Khokhar's picture
Also available in: 中文 | Español | العربية | Français

In most regions of the world, over 70 percent of freshwater is used for agriculture. By 2050, feeding a planet of 9 billion people will require an estimated 50 percent increase in agricultural production and a 15 percent increase in water withdrawals.

How level is the playing field between countries in Latin America and the Caribbean?

Oscar Calvo-González's picture
Also available in: Español | Portuguese

In less than a generation the Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) region has made great progress in expanding the basic public services that are necessary for children to succeed later in life. The skills, knowledge and health accumulated by individuals by the time they reach adulthood are essential to get jobs, accelerate economic mobility, and reduce inequality in the long-run. The progress observed in LAC ranges from increased access to healthcare and schools to running water and electricity. But progress has also been uneven, both across countries and for different types of basic services.

Today, the playing field in Latin America is most level in access to electricity, where we have seen gaps in coverage narrow the most. Figure 1 below shows how the typical performance in the region (the median) compares with the country in the region with the highest level of coverage (labeled “best in class”) in three basic services for children. The focus on children makes it possible to determine that any difference in access would be mostly due to circumstances out of their control. In the case of access to electricity the regional median has not only converged towards the best performing country but it has now reached a coverage of 99 percent.

Chart: Tourism Reaches all-time high in Peru

Erin Scronce's picture

Peru welcomed 3.2 million tourists in 20 14, the highest number to date. In some regions of the country, like Cusco, tourism is a potential economic lifeline for local people, who can profit from a variety of businesses serving tourists. In 2012, the World Bank Group began working with The Government of Peru to streamline the processes around opening tourism-related businesses because excessive regulations and red tape were holding up investments in new businesses for years. Ultimately, the project shaved 3 years off the business registration process and eliminated 150 unnecessary regulations. With the streamlined regulations in place, investments in hotels in Peru are on the rise. Between 2015 and 2018, Peru is expecting US$1.2 billion in investments in new hotels, an increase from US$550 million during the period 2010-2014.

 Find out more here.

Chart: How Does Extreme Poverty Vary By Region?

Tariq Khokhar's picture
Also available in: 中文


Most of the world's extreme poor live in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia. While over 1 in 10 people live in extreme poverty globally, in Sub-Saharan Africa, that figure is 4 in 10, representing 389 million people - that's more poor people than all other regions combined. Read more in the new report on Poverty and Shared Prosperity
 

Global Data Lab: a resource for subnational development indicators from household surveys

Jeroen Smits's picture

This is a guest blog written by Jeroen Smits of the Global Data Lab, an initiative hosted by the Nijmegen Center for Economics (NiCE) at Radboud University in the Netherlands.  

Disaggregation of indicators at the subnational level is one of the key elements to effectively monitor the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). At the same time, this is a great challenge, as in the case for many countries, only indicators at the national level are available.
 
This is particularly the case for poor countries, where administrative systems are less equipped and capable to generate reliable and representative information. Strengthening those systems is the preferred solution, but that takes time and does not produce the indicators for earlier years required for tracing developments over time.

Children nearly twice more likely to be poor than adults in Latin America

Oscar Calvo-González's picture
Also available in: Español | Portuguese

Childhood poverty in Latin America has declined steadily but remains much higher than poverty among adults. In 2014 poverty among children stood at 36 percent, almost twice the rate for adults (19 percent - see briefing note). The chart below shows that poverty has decreased for both adults and children, but a closer look at the data reveals that childhood poverty has been declining at a slower pace than among adults.
 

Headwinds for all

Oscar Calvo-González's picture
Also available in: Español | Portuguese
The ongoing economic slowdown has lowered growth across all segments of the income distribution in Latin America, leaving behind the much different story of the mid-2000s. Back then economic growth was not just high; it also benefited the poor more than the rest of the population. In fact, between 2006 and 2011, Latin America and the Caribbean had the highest growth rate in the world for the incomes of the poorest 40 percent of the population. Since then, however, growth rates have continued to decelerate.
 

Why are Indigenous Peoples more likely to be poor?

Oscar Calvo-González's picture
Also available in: Español | Portuguese

Indigenous Peoples face poverty rates that are on average twice as high as for the rest of Latin Americans. This fact is probably not a surprise to most readers of this blog. More intriguing, however, are three additional findings from recent work on the topic.

First, until recently, we did not have as robust quantitative evidence of such poverty gaps as that found in the recent World Bank report Indigenous Latin America in the Twenty-First Century. In fact, not all countries in the region have data on poverty by ethnicity and fewer still have the micro-data needed to understand the stumbling blocks that Indigenous Peoples face on the path out of poverty.

Second, the gap between the poverty rate of Indigenous Peoples and the rest of the population is not getting smaller. In some countries the gap remains stagnant and in others it is actually widening. Why are Indigenous Peoples benefiting less from growth and more likely to be poor? One way to explore these issues is to disentangle how much of the poverty gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous populations can be explained by factors such as that indigenous peoples tend to live in rural areas, have lower education, etc. The results of such analysis bring us to my final point, illustrated in the chart below.

Source: SEDLAC (World Bank and CEDLAS). Note: the bars represent the percentage of people living on less than US$4 per day 2005 PPP for indigenous peoples and the rest of the population. The poverty rates are calculated using late-2000s weighted average for Bolivia, Ecuador, Guatemala, Mexico and Peru.
*Variables include characteristics of the head of the household (education, age, and gender), family composition (number of non-working members), geographical characteristics (country of residence, rural status) and employment characteristics of the head (sector of employment and occupation).

Chart: Higher Poverty Rates for Latin America's Indigenous

Tariq Khokhar's picture
Also available in: 中文 | Portuguese | Français | Español

Indigenous people in Latin America account for less than 8% of the population, yet make up more than 17% of the region's extremely poor, due to a persistent pattern of social exclusion. Read More and download the report "Indigenous Latin America in the twenty-first century"
 

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