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5 reasons why big data innovation is critical to address climate resilience

Haishan Fu's picture


In today’s world of mobile technology, social networks, pervasive satellite and sensor information and machine-to-machine transactions, data is becoming the lifeblood of many economies. Data-informed decision making is more important than ever before. However, the ability to use data in development and decision-making processes has not seen the same progress. Relying on data to inform decisions requires that the appropriate tools and analytical methodologies exist in order to use it effectively.

Through the Big Data Innovation Challenge, the World Bank is calling out to innovators globally for higher resolution, regional or sector-specific big data prototypes and solutions in support of watersheds, forests, food security and nutrition.

Here are five facts from our climate team about our water, forests and food security that remind us why your big data innovation is necessary.

Are we ready to embrace big private-sector data?

Andrew Whitby's picture



The use of big data to help understand the global economy continues to build momentum. Last week our sister institution, the International Monetary Fund, launched their own program in big data, with a slate of interesting speakers including Hal Varian (Google Chief Economist), Susan Athey (Professor at Stanford GSB and a former Microsoft Chief Economist) and DJ Patil (Chief Data Scientist of the United States).
 
The day's speakers grappled with the implications of big data for the Fund's bread-and-butter macroeconomic analysis--a topic of great interest to the World Bank Group too. Examples were presented in which big data is used to generate macroeconomic series that have traditionally been the preserve of national statistical offices (NSOs): for example, MIT's Billion Prices Project, which measures price inflation in a radically different way from traditional CPI statistics.
 

Scenes from a Dive - what’s big data got to do with fighting poverty and fraud?

Prasanna Lal Das's picture

World Bank Data Dive 2013

Photo Credit: Neil Fantom

A more detailed recap will follow soon but here’s a very quick hats off to the about 150 data scientists, civic hackers, visual analytics savants, poverty specialists, and fraud/anti-corruption experts that made the Big Data Exploration at Washington DC over the weekend such an eye-opener.

Would you give up your personal data for development?

Prasanna Lal Das's picture

 

 

If you joined us at the World Bank for Open Data Day on Saturday, February 23, you heard about the DC Data Dive slated for March 15-17. 

 

If you're playing catch up, read more about the plans and potential impact for future Data Dives. Also have a look at what colleagues at a Data Dive in Venice accomplished by analysing World Bank contracts and vendors. And now, read the cross-posted blog below from UNDP's Giulio Quaggiotto and World Bank's Prasanna Lal Das who ask: Would You Give Up Your Personal Data for Development? 

 

This week: Open Access, Big Data and Development Policy

Tariq Khokhar's picture

Are you interested in the accessibility of research, the application of data and the future of development policy? Don't miss these three events happening at the World Bank this week:

 

  1. Monday 22nd at 4pm EST: The Kickoff of Open Access Week 2012
  2. Thursday 25th at 2pm EST: "Turning Big Data into Big Impact"
  3. Thursday 25th- Friday 26th: "Using History to Inform Development Policy"