Syndicate content

datalab

Chart: The changing causes of death in low-income countries

Tariq Khokhar's picture
Also available in: العربية | 中文 | Français | Español

Note: Data from World Health Organization Global Health Estimates and as noted in their methodology (PDF) they use the World Bank's Income Classification as of 2014. 

Worldwide, the leading causes of death are changing, and they vary between rich and poor countries. In low-income countries, deaths from communicable diseases such as malaria and HIV/AIDS have fallen, while deaths from non-communicable diseases such as stroke and diabetes are on the rise.

While explanations for these changing causes vary, my colleague Patricio Marquez recently wrote about the global rise in the number of overweight people and people with diabetes.  Patricio notes that this is not only a problem of the rich - or the rich world;  about 80% of people with diabetes live in low- and middle-income countries.  Shifts in society are behind these changes: urbanization is changing traditional diets and lifestyles; and the aging of the population results in the natural deterioration of multiple organ systems which contributes to the onset of diabetes.  

You can explore the data further in this interactive data visualiztion:

Chart: How Long Does It Take to Register Property?

Tariq Khokhar's picture
Also available in: العربية | Español | Français

Well-designed land administration systems provide reliable information on the ownership of property, making it possible for the property market to exist. Data from Doing Business show that economies with simpler, faster, and less costly processes for property transfers also have on average the highest-quality land administration systems.

Chart: Women More Often Work Unpaid in Family Firms

Tariq Khokhar's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français | 中文 | Español

Globally 55% of women participate in the labor force vs. 82% of men. In many countries, women are also more likely than men to be working without pay in family-owned business such as shops and farms. Read more in the World Bank's Gender Data Portal.

Where do women most lag men in access to financial institutions?

Masako Hiraga's picture

Where do women most lag men in access to financial institutions?

 


Globally, an average of 65% of men and 58% of women over the age of 15 have an account at a financial institution. However, beneath this 7 percentage point global difference, there are many countries where the gender gaps are much wider. Find our more in the Gender Data Portal and the Global Findex data portal.

 

Chart: Higher Poverty Rates for Latin America's Indigenous

Tariq Khokhar's picture
Also available in: 中文 | Portuguese | Français | Español

Indigenous people in Latin America account for less than 8% of the population, yet make up more than 17% of the region's extremely poor, due to a persistent pattern of social exclusion. Read More and download the report "Indigenous Latin America in the twenty-first century"
 

Chart: Pakistan Leads South Asia in Mobile Money

Tariq Khokhar's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية

In 2014, an average of 3% of people in South Asia used a mobile phone to send or receive money. While there are still gaps between how often men and women use these services, Pakistan leads the region with 9% of men and 2% of women moving money on their mobiles. You can find more data on financial inclusion in the Global Findex Database
 

Chart: the future price of oil?

Tariq Khokhar's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français | 中文 | Español | 日本語

The World Bank's forecast for the average oil price in 2016 is $37 per barrel. Commodity Markets Outlook provides a quarterly analysis of international commodity markets, and the oil forecast reflects factors including a slowing global economy, high oil inventories and unchanged OPEC policy prioritizing market share.
 

Chart: $1 Trillion in Telecom Investment since 1990

Tariq Khokhar's picture
Also available in: Français

Public Private Partnerships (PPPs) bring together the private sector and governments to provide public infrastructure. The total investment in infrastructure was $25.3 billion in the first half of 2015. The PPP Knowledge Lab brings together data and reports on these projects.

Pages